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Looking for a DA 22 lr revolver

Ringel05

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It's a loading gate, they are all a PITA. That said I don't find it anymore difficult to operate than others but I'm not mechanically disadvantaged either......I can even reassemble a Ruger Standard with minimal cussing. ;)
I've read that the Ruger Mark series requires huge rubber mallets, hardwood boards and engaging the four-wheel drive on a pickup truck to get the upper off of the receiver............ Not including the accompanying proverbial explosive strings of invectives.
 
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Dagosa

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It's a loading gate, they are all a PITA. That said I don't find it anymore difficult to operate than others but I'm not mechanically disadvantaged either......I can even reassemble a Ruger Standard with minimal cussing. ;)
Ha ha
The Ruger standard is tricky. I found you had to hold it the right angle so the actuator rod fell into the slot. That IS A true PITA. Ruger has a tendency for that. The 20/22 bolt reassembly is rediculous too. Have to refer to UTUBE reassembly instructions everytime I clean it.
 

Dagosa

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I've read that the Ruger Mark series requires huge rubber mallets, hardwood boards and engaging the four-wheel drive on a pickup truck to get the upper off of the receiver............ Not including the accompanying proverbial explosive strings of invectives.
Not quite...but close.
 

Dagosa

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It's a loading gate, they are all a PITA. That said I don't find it anymore difficult to operate than others but I'm not mechanically disadvantaged either......I can even reassemble a Ruger Standard with minimal cussing. ;)
Had one of these for a while. A crude trigger action but still a lot of fun. Should never have traded it.
 

1srelluc

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Had one of these for a while. A crude trigger action but still a lot of fun. Should never have traded it.
The triggers on H&Rs are terrible to work on. You either learn not to be trigger sensitive, work on it yourself, or be prepared for one hell of a hourly bill from a gunsmith to do it for you. Damn shame as they are put together like tanks.
 

1srelluc

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Buy an old colt trooper MK3
I owned one in .22 LR many years ago but it was way too pretty to carry in the field and I ended-up using it as trade fodder. That and it was a 6". I prefer 4" revolvers.....Looking at GunPorker a decent used (no box) 4" example is around $800-$900. Not bad really for what you get, a .22 revolver that will last a lifetime.

I have a 1980 MK III .357 in the "Colt-guard" finish and it's a tank.

DSCN8845__2__JPG-964245.JPG
 

Dagosa

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The triggers on H&Rs are terrible to work on. You either learn not to be trigger sensitive, work on it yourself, or be prepared for one hell of a hourly bill from a gunsmith to do it for you. Damn shame as they are put together like tanks.
Exactly. Shooting an HR always felt to me like “the safety” was on… even though it didn’t have one.

I’ve had a bunch of them, mainly used as expendable handguns you keep in your UTV or at camp.
But, I got rid of everyone because they were a PITA to actually shoot. If a shooter wants something “long and hard” it’s going to be an HR trigger pull.
 

Dagosa

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I owned one in .22 LR many years ago but it was way too pretty to carry in the field and I ended-up using it as trade fodder. That and it was a 6". I prefer 4" revolvers.....Looking at GunPorker a decent used (no box) 4" example is around $800-$900. Not bad really for what you get, a .22 revolver that will last a lifetime.

I have a 1980 MK III .357 in the "Colt-guard" finish and it's a tank.

DSCN8845__2__JPG-964245.JPG
They easily last a life time because they’re so heavy to carry anywhere like all full frame .22.

That’s why everyone likes a Kit Gun or Pathfinder because you can “plink” as an after thought after carting it around half the day while doing something else.
 

1srelluc

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They easily last a life time because they’re so heavy to carry anywhere like all full frame .22.

That’s why everyone likes a Kit Gun or Pathfinder because you can “plink” as an after thought after carting it around half the day while doing something else.
There are exceptions like the 9-shot High Standard Sentinel line of revolvers, light in weight (1.5#), of decent quality, an acceptable SA trigger, but yet big enough to hold and hit with easily.....Sorry about the damn cat.

h 002 (2).JPG

I've owned several Model 34 S&Ws (kit gun) and always found them a bit lacking. I had one in .22 mag that was a complete dog so you just never know.
 

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