Keep giving them jobs and they will keep coming.

LilOlLady

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KEEP GIVING THEM JOBS AND THEY WILL KEEP COMING.


No matter how secure the border is, if there are jobs for them they will continue to come. Securing the border to stop illegal immigration has been a waste of time and tax payers money because if there are jobs for them they will come. They know if they get past border patrols they have made it to home base and virtually “untouchable” unless they are picked up on a criminal offense. Businesses addiction to cheap labor provide jobs for them an having an American born child they have hit the jackpot. Unless we get serious about an E-Verity system and punish businesses that hire illegal labor things will continue as it has for the past 50 years. If they know there are no jobs waiting from them illegally and no Automatic Birthright Citizenship for their American born children they will stop jumping the fence and overstaying their visas illegally and will use the door. They only ones who will be attempting to cross illegally will be drug smugglers and other criminals because crime is more lucrative here than them Mexico.



Until we have someone who has the cajones to enforce our immigration laws and not sleeping with businesses things will continue as usually.

Comprehensive Immigration Reform is just another word for incentive that will do nothing to stop illegal immigration.



Yes we can force them to self deport without rounding them up and putting them on busses, planes, trains and donkeys. And we don’t need a 20ft, electrifying barbed wired fence. Don’t insult the intelligence of the American people.
 

waltky

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Granny says if dey ain't gonna arrest `em - den what are we payin' `em fer??...
:eusa_eh:
Union President Testifies: ICE HQ Ordered Agents Not to Arrest Illegals--Including Fugitives
October 20, 2011 - Chris Crane, president of a union that represents Immigration and Customs Enforcement officers, testified in the House Judiciary Subcommittee on Immigration last week that ICE agents have been told by ICE headquarters not to arrest illegal aliens who do not have a prior criminal conviction even if they are fugitives who have been ordered deported by an immigration judge or are individuals who have illegally re-entered the United States after being deported and thus have perpetrated a felony.
“Aliens who could not be arrested included but were not limited to ICE fugitives that had been ordered deported by a federal immigration judge as well as aliens who had illegally re-entered the United States after deportation, a federal felony,” Crane, who is also an active-duty ICE agent, told the committee on Oct. 12. “ICE officers and agents also alleged that they were not permitted to arrest or even speak to confirmed or suspected illegal aliens encountered in the field during operations and were prohibited from running standard criminal record checks for wants and warrants,” Crane testified. Crane had previously testified about the matter in the subcommittee in late July. “When I last testified before the subcommittee on July 25, 2011, I reported among other things that ICE enforcement removal officers and agents in the field alleged that unwritten directives from ICE headquarters had been issued nationwide ordering officers not to arrest aliens unless it was confirmed that the alien had received a prior conviction for a criminal offense,” Crane told the committee last week.

Since his July testimony, he said, his union has been working with the Judiciary Committee on the issue. “I would like to thank Chairman [Lamar] Smith and his staff for working with the union regarding this matter after the July 25 hearing,” said Crane. “Chairman Smith provided us with the opportunity to bring officers forward as witnesses. We were also able to turn over several internal ICE documents which appear to not only verify that these activities did in fact take place, but also named several senior level ICE managers allegedly involved in issuing the directives nationwide. “Second,” Crane testified, “I would like to address the impact and effectiveness of these type of orders. I have never heard of any law enforcement agency in the nation that prohibits its officers from even speaking to or interviewing individuals who are inside a house in which the officers are attempting to affect an arrest.

“From a law enforcement standpoint what could be the possible benefit?” said Crane. “The only purpose for an order such as this is to prevent officers from making arrests which ICE leadership has allegedly stated is its goal. However, these directives not only prevent the arrest of non criminal aliens but also prevent the identification and arrest of very dangerous criminals, potentially individuals involved in terrorist activities.” Crane told the committee that he believed the ICE policy was putting both the public and ICE agents at risk. “It not only prevents officers from talking to and arresting persons who may be wanted for crimes but also individuals who are being victimized and in need of assistance,” said Crane. “Certainly, anyone can see that these practices are contrary to effective law enforcement practice and place the public at risk. Many officers will tell you that the majority of their best arrests, the arrests that most benefit public safety, come from unintended encounters with criminal aliens in the course of looking for a different target in the field.

“Of course, these practices also place our officers at risk,” said Crane. “Nothing that I could ever say here today can capture the dynamics as they unfold when a door opens and our officers enter a house that they've never been in before. It's dangerous. Officers don't know who is in the house or what they are capable of doing. Problems often arise that require officers to remain in a house for extended periods. Officers on the scene must have the ability to provide for their own safety. They should never be prohibited from talking to people at the scene, conducting interviews as needed, running appropriate background checks, or even making additional arrests.”

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waltky

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NAFTA finally doin' what it was supposed to do...
:cool:
Is Mexico's economy really driving down illegal immigration to the US?
October 21, 2011 - A big drop in illegal immigration seems to be taking place along the US-Mexico border. Some attribute this to rising prosperity in Mexico, but other more influential factors are in play.
According to a 2010 Department of Homeland Security report, the number of undocumented immigrants living in the US declined from 11.6 million in 2008 to 10.6 million in 2009, the largest decrease in 30 years. One of the most common explanations for this phenomenon is that Mexico has witnessed the emergence of a middle class, lessening the economic incentive to cross the border. While it is true that a segment of the population has seen a growth in disposable income over the past five years, a July study by consulting firm De la Riva Group revealed that only 32 percent of the country is “middle class,” defined as making the equivalent of between 13,500 pesos ($1,000) and 98,499 pesos ($7,360) per month.

In contrast, the latest poverty statistics from Mexico’s government poverty monitor CONEVAL indicate that the number of people living below the poverty line in Mexico (2,114 pesos or $158 per month in urban areas, 1,329 pesos or $99 per month in the countryside) increased by 3.2 million between 2008 and 2010, and now stands at 52 million. This figure amounts to more than 46 percent of the country's 112 million inhabitants. This directly contradicts optimistic accounts in the US media which imply that increasing standards of living in Mexico are causing immigration to fall, such as recent articles in the Sacramento Bee and New York Times. While CONEVAL notes that some states (notably Puebla, Coahuila, and Morelos) have made inroads against poverty, it cannot by any means be said that Mexico is mostly middle class.

Another commonly cited explanation for the reduction in undocumented migration is the surge in deportations under the Obama administration, which presents a further deterrent to those thinking about crossing the border. According to figures recently released by the Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency (ICE), a record 396,906 individuals were deported from October 2010 through September of this year. As a result of this trend, many individuals who continue to risk the perilous border crossing are seasoned experts who have crossed multiple times, often because they have families in the U.S. According to the New York Times, 56 percent of arrests at the Mexican border in 2010 involved people who had been caught previously, up from 44 percent in 2005.

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Latin American police get 'citizen friendly' to fight bad reputation
October 21, 2011 - Latin American police, seen by many in the region as part of the problem rather than the solution to crime, are trying to boost their involvement in and response to their communities.
Jaime López Victoria taped a small flier with the photos and cellphone numbers of three local cops to the cash register at the convenience store where he works in Mexico City. Customers at first might think the clerk is warning residents to steer clear of the three men, as poorly paid cops here are better known for extracting bribes and colluding with organized crime than enforcing the law.

But Mr. López is actually helping his customers reach out to cops as part of a new police program here to increase residents' familiarity with authorities and reduce police response times. “They stopped by and told me who was in charge, who was on patrol, who was on a bike,” López says.

The need for such confidence-building initiatives extends across Latin America. Only 16 percent of respondents across 18 regional countries say security is good or very good in their countries, and 31 percent say police corruption is the reason that states can't seem to get crime under control, according to the latest poll by the Latinobarómetro Corporation, a nonprofit based in Santiago, Chile. Now efforts are under way across the region to restore citizens' faith in their local protectors.

Community-friendly policing
 

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