'Keep An Eye On Diyala'

Annie

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Watching some of the areas being brought up at statfor, strategy page, and now this:

http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20070309/ts_nm/iraq_usa_troops_dc

U.S. general wants more troops for volatile province

By Andrew GrayFri Mar 9, 1:45 PM ET

The U.S. commander for northern Iraq has asked for more troops to clamp down on insurgent attacks and sectarian violence in the volatile province of Diyala, he said on Friday.

Maj. Gen. Benjamin Mixon said he had moved additional forces from his own area into Diyala and requested extra troops from elsewhere in the country from Lt. Gen. Ray Odierno, the top commander of day-to-day operations in Iraq.

"Could I use more forces in Diyala? No question about it and I'm in discussions about it with Gen. Odierno as he attempts to balance the requirements in Baghdad," Mixon told reporters at the Pentagon by videolink from Iraq.

Despite opposition from Democrats who want a timetable for a U.S. withdrawal from Iraq, President George W. Bush has already ordered more than 20,000 additional troops into battle, most of them to help stabilize Baghdad. There are currently about 140,000 U.S. troops in the country.

Religiously mixed Diyala, northeast of Baghdad, has witnessed some of the worst sectarian violence in Iraq between Shi'ites and Sunnis. A suicide bomber killed 30 people in a cafe in a town in Diyala on Wednesday.

U.S military commanders say militants are also using Diyala -- a rural area of palm groves and orchards -- as a launching ground for attacks in Baghdad.

Mixon declined to say how many additional troops he had requested but advised reporters to "keep an eye on what goes on in Diyala over the next couple of weeks."

He said he was encouraged by security progress in other northern provinces but that violence had increased in Diyala.

...
 

maineman

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Diyala is now a problem? hmmmmm

and I thought that the addition of 21.5K in Baghdad and Anbar was all that was needed to turn this sow's ear into a silk purse...to turn this bloody sectarian carnage into a multicultural Jeffersonian democracy.....

the surge is going well, it would seem.
 
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Annie

Annie

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Diyala is now a problem? hmmmmm

and I thought that the addition of 21.5K in Baghdad and Anbar was all that was needed to turn this sow's ear into a silk purse...to turn this bloody sectarian carnage into a multicultural Jeffersonian democracy.....

the surge is going well, it would seem.
Did you read the article? Those on the ground in Iraq seem to think it's improving. You are not implying that those there know less than those at 'home' regardless of their experiences in the past?
 

maineman

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Did you read the article? Those on the ground in Iraq seem to think it's improving. You are not implying that those there know less than those at 'home' regardless of their experiences in the past?
I did read your article and I think that your portrayal of that article as saying that "those on the ground in Iraq seem to think it's improving " is nothing short of brilliant and creative fiction.
 
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Annie

Annie

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I did read your article and I think that your portrayal of that article as saying that "those on the ground in Iraq seem to think it's improving " is nothing short of brilliant and creative fiction.
I misread this:

...Mixon declined to say how many additional troops he had requested but advised reporters to "keep an eye on what goes on in Diyala over the next couple of weeks."

He said he was encouraged by security progress in other northern provinces but that violence had increased in Diyala.

Mixon said U.S. forces believed extremists had moved into Diyala from Baghdad, where U.S. and Iraqi troops are engaged in a security crackdown, and the western province of Anbar, a stronghold of Sunni insurgents and al Qaeda fighters.

"I have moved additional forces and capabilities into Diyala over the last couple of weeks as we began larger offensive operations in (the provincial capital) Baquba and other portions of the surrounding area," he said.

Mixon said he was cautiously optimistic his troops would see an improvement in Diyala in the next 30-60 days.

"If we do not, I will make adjustments and I may go back to Gen. Odierno and ask for additional support," he said.

...
 

maineman

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you didn't misread it necessarily, but to characterize someone pointing out that the violence had shifted to another area of Iraq as a situation that was "improving" is just a tad too koolaid soaked for me to buy into.
 

red states rule

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you didn't misread it necessarily, but to characterize someone pointing out that the violence had shifted to another area of Iraq as a situation that was "improving" is just a tad too koolaid soaked for me to buy into.
CNN Reporter: Artificial Iraq Deadline 'Serves Only America's Enemies'
Posted by Mark Finkelstein on March 8, 2007 - 16:08.
Something is happening on the ground in Iraq. Something that even certain representatives of the MSM can't deny. Earlier this week, as NewsBusters noted here and here, NBC's Brian Williams, reporting from Iraq, offered some unusually positive observations. Now comes this eye-opening exchange from earlier this afternoon on CNN International between host Jim Clancy and correspondent Michael Ware, also reporting from Iraq:

JIM CLANCY: "The Democrats are pressing for a deadline, be it at the end of 2007, 2008 to bring all U.S. troops home. How is that going to affect General Petraeus, the Iraqi government and the Iraqis themselves?"

MICHAEL WARE: "Well, Jim, certainly in terms of the Iraqis and the war that's being fought in the streets and the deserts of this country, I mean, what's happening over there, what the Democrats are saying about timetables may as well be happening on the planet Pluto for all that it counts, to the bloodshed and endless combat that we're seeing day in, day out. All that it does, anyone setting time frames like that without real pre-conditions, anyone trying to put artificial deadlines upon this conflict is only aiding the enemies, so-called, of America, al Qaeda and Iran. It allows them some leverage to know when to put the pressure on, to know that the clock is ticking and to know where the pressure points are.

WARE: "So, in terms of the battle, day-to-day here, General Petraeus isn't looking more forward than five or six months. He's trying to make this surge work. But in terms of the broader strategic framework, it serves only America's enemies."

Nancy & Harry, are you listening?

http://newsbusters.org/node/11288
 

maineman

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so...rd stats rul.... if the bloodshed and carnage is continuing at the same rate as it is now by mid-summer, will you admit that the surge has not worked?



oh...by the way... it was not surprising in the least to see you resort to tangential arguments made with the words of others rather than actually try to put a string of words together yourself.
 

red states rule

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so...rd stats rul.... if the bloodshed and carnage is continuing at the same rate as it is now by mid-summer, will you admit that the surge has not worked?



oh...by the way... it was not surprising in the least to see you resort to tangential arguments made with the words of others rather than actually try to put a string of words together yourself.
Just as I expected. Even when a reporter from the Clinton News Network reports postie news and says how the Dems are helping the terrorists - you being a loyal member of the jackass party - you still ignore the facts and attack the messenger
 

maineman

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Just as I expected. Even when a reporter from the Clinton News Network reports postie news and says how the Dems are helping the terrorists - you being a loyal member of the jackass party - you still ignore the facts and attack the messenger

why are you so afraid of answering simple questions?

let me try again:

if the bloodshed and carnage is continuing at the same rate as it is now by mid-summer, will you admit that the surge has not worked?

yes or no?
 

red states rule

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why are you so afraid of answering simple questions?

let me try again:

if the bloodshed and carnage is continuing at the same rate as it is now by mid-summer, will you admit that the surge has not worked?

yes or no?
The violence is down and the people of Iraq are asking the US troops to stay. What is so hard about this for you grasp?
 

maineman

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why are you afraid of answering a simple question?
 

red states rule

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why are you afraid of answering a simple question?
I did. the surge is working much to your dismay. The troops are ready to complete the mission, why are Dems so determined not to let them?

NBC Highlights Troops Who Support US Presence in Iraq
Posted by Brad Wilmouth on March 6, 2007 - 23:45.
On Tuesday's NBC Nightly News, anchor Brian Williams, reporting from Baghdad, delivered a refreshing end to the show as he showcased several U.S. troops who voiced support for their work in Iraq, and for America continuing its presence there. While Williams did present one soldier who was less than enthusiastic about the mission, other troops, featured in pre-recorded soundbites, spoke of "staying until the job is done," and of feeling "proud" about helping the Iraqis.

As the NBC anchor introduced the story about how the military tries to deliver foods and items to comfort the troops stationed in Iraq, he featured an Army lieutenant colonel who does not feel "trepidation" about going out on patrol, even after the recent loss of American lives. Lieutenant Colonel Quammie Semper commented: "I think we should stay here until the job is done." (Transcript follows)

Williams then turned to Sergeant Tina Neal, on her third tour of duty, who "says she keeps coming back and risking her life for the Iraqi civilians." Neal commented: "I feel very proud to be here helping them. I think that it is a good thing that we're doing for them."

After featuring one soldier showing frustration at the mission, and after delving into some of the comforts troops are supplied with, Williams concluded the story with an exchange with Sergeant Kenneta Nelson, who "thinks America ought to stay in Iraq." Nelson: "It's not possible to just up and go. I mean, there are, with the things that are going on here, it's kind of like we're in the middle of something."

Below is a complete transcript of the story from the Tuesday March 6 NBC Nightly News:

Brian Williams: "We are back here in Baghdad tonight at this massive U.S. base they call Camp Victory. And for the thousands of American soldiers now asleep in these tents, it is nothing at all like home. So the military tries to make it at least comfortable, knowing so many have volunteered to serve and are dedicated to their jobs, however dangerous. On the very day when they received word that so many more of their fellow soldiers have been killed, you would forgive the young lieutenant for showing some trepidation about the patrol he's about to lead into Baghdad or the mission overall. But not this lieutenant, and not on this day."

Lieutenant Quammie Semper, U.S. Army: "I think we should stay here until the job is done."

Williams: "You feel you have an investment?"

Semper: "We do. We do. I see that every day, every time I roll out this gate."

Williams: "The sergeant on this same patrol is on her third tour in Iraq. She says she keeps coming back and risking her life for the Iraqi civilians."

Sergeant Tina Neal, U.S. Army: "I feel very proud to be here helping them. I think that it is a good thing that we're doing for them."

Williams: "Not all the solders here are like her. Go to one of the new American outposts in a dangerous, exposed part of Baghdad, and you'll hear this from a staff sergeant also on his third tour."

Staff Sergeant Jason Simmer, U.S. Army: "I've seen too many people get injured and no reason for it, and I've just seen enough."

Williams: "The highest ranking enlisted man on this base, Command Sergeant Major Jeff Mellinger, has been around a long time. He can readily spot the soldiers who have been out in it and badly need a break."

Sergeant Major Jeff Mellinger, U.S. Army: "They'll have the signs and symptoms that they're just, you know, they're dirty, they're tired, you know, they've got wrinkles on their face from staring, you know, down the road at something. Nobody here is riding for free."

Williams: "Camp Victory in Iraq is a stressed out, teeming city of American soldiers and those who support them, who are keeping up a fast tempo in a spotty war. There are victories and defeats, desk jobs and dangerous missions. And for all of them, the military has tried to provide. It is possible in the middle of this 10-square-mile fenced in corner of Baghdad fesert to pretend you're home. There's Popeye's and there's Burger King. There's Cinnabon and some of Seattle's Best. And there's a spot for lunch right up against a concrete blast wall with a canopy of camouflage netting overhead. There are more culinary reminders from home. In this case, Subway, and over here, Pizza Hut. In this case, emphasis on 'hut.' And inside the base PX, it's as if someone airlifted a Wal-Mart from America to Iraq. Everything you could ever want to eat, drink, watch, including watches and wear. A massive attempt to provide. For those just back from the action, this station tries to provide a respite from it, though some aren't looking for any more action than they've already seen. Sergeant Kenneta Nelson thinks America ought to stay in Iraq, even if we later found out she isn't."

Sergeant Kenneta Nelson, U.S. Army: "It's not possible to just up and go. I mean, there are, with the things that are going on here, it's kind of like we're in the middle of something. Even if I was staying longer than Friday-"

Williams: "Friday?"

Nelson: "Considering I'm going home, my year is done-"

Williams: "Wow!"

Nelson: "It's still not."

Williams: "Wow!"

Nelson: "Yes."

Williams: "You got to be careful."

Williams: "The day so many soldiers live for, the end of the tour. That's our look at Camp Victory tonight, and that's the end of our broadcast for this Tuesday night. Thank you, as always, for being with us. I'm Brian Williams, reporting again tonight from Baghdad. We'll look for you again from here tomorrow night. For Campbell Brown in New York and our team on the ground here, good night."

http://newsbusters.org/node/11239
 

maineman

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how are the opinions of four sergeants and a lieutenant proof that the surge is working?
 

maineman

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So only 5 guys in Iraq support the war in your pea brain?
I never said that...and whether anyone "supports the war" is not proof that the surge is working.

you have the logical reasoning skills of a carrot
 

red states rule

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Shhhh... The Surge is Working
By Patrick Ruffini
Saturday, February 24, 2007

Send an email to Patrick Ruffini
gloomy haze has settled over the nation's prosecution of the War on Terror as of late. It seems like we can only watch helplessly as Nancy Pelosi and Jack Murtha size up new angles of attack for undermining the war effort. The media is chomping at the bit the tell the story of an America, bruised and humbled and exhausted, heading for the exits in Iraq.

But something interesting is happening on the way to the "new direction." Early indications are that the troop surge into Baghdad is working. It hasn't been reported on widely, but murders in Baghdad are down 70%, attacks are down 80%, Mahdi Army chief Moqtada al-Sadr has reportedly made off for Iran, and many Baghdadis who had fled the violence now feel it's safe enough to return. The strategy that Congress is busy denouncing is proving to be our best hope for victory.

In Iraq, there's a sense that change is in the air -- literally. Omar of Iraq the Model spots a B-1 Bomber in the skies of Baghdad for the first time since the end of the major combat. On the ground, Omar writes that the signs that Iraqis are getting serious about security are more palbable. With the help of Compstat-like technology, security forces are cracking down at checkpoints (even ambulances are getting stopped) and getting nimbler about locating them strategically so the terrorists don't know what to expect.

This turnaround in Baghdad is confirmed at home by the media's near-deafening silence. If it seems like you've heard less about how Iraq is spiraling into civil war in the weeks since the surge was announced, this is why. Even some discordant voices in the media are starting to wonder what's happening. Time magazine worries that it's "Quiet in Baghdad. Too quiet." That's right -- a dramatic reduction in violence is actually bad news.

It's too early to claim victory just yet; the operation is just two weeks old. But U.S. troops have been able to accomplish all of this with just one more brigade in-country, with four more on the way by May. These encouraging early returns show the potential for success when we apply concentrated military force to the security problem. When the Army and Marine Corps are on offense, carrying out combat operations and clearing out insurgent strongholds, we win. When we lay back, carrying out routine patrols and playing Baghdad beat cop, we lose.

The key to success is staying power. The always incisive Daffyd ab-Hugh has a good read on this dynamic. Counterinsurgency in Iraq has often been compared to a game of whack-a-mole -- secure an area, only to have the insurgents pop up somewhere else. But if we slammed a mallet into the hole, and kept it there, then picked up a new one... and did the same?

This is a new game called Seal-a-Hole , and it has a very different dynamic from Whack-a-Mole: the normal game is one of futility; the game continues until the player gets tired and quits or he runs out of money. But Seal-a-Hole actually has a victory point: when all the holes are sealed, the game is over -- and the player, America, has won.

Even though Seal-a-Hole is not futile, it nevertheless requires a great deal of patience; there are many, many holes, and each hole has a mole who must be whacked. Some of the holes, such as Sadr City, are very big and will require many mallets to properly seal. But if we have the courage and fortitude of our American forebears, we will seal those holes... and we will win.

On the political front, the White House also seems to have dislodged a major roadblock to victory: Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki's reluctance to allow U.S. troops to take the fight to Sadr and his militias. Returning American troops have expressed their frustration at having to walk on eggshells when it came to came to entering Shi'ite areas, a backbone of support for the government. Thankfully, the rules of engagement are changing. American troops are now freer to take on all comers, and the results are clear in both Sunni and Shi'ite areas.

In the coming days and weeks, these rules of engagement will face their ultimate test with the decision to enter Sadr City, the Mahdi Army's key stronghold. And enter we must. Those intent on turning Iraq into a breeding ground for al-Qaeda won't be convinced of our seriousness until we confront the key sources of violence on both sides of the sectarian divide.

When things don't go well in Iraq, we see the endless B-roll of chaos and carnage. When things are on the upswing, we tend to hear more about Anna Nicole Smith. The media will never acknowledge victories in Iraq, so we'll have to settle for an absence of bad coverage. But even in this relative lull in Iraq, it's important to understand and appreciate the short-term victories so we can create more of them. And finish the job.


Patrick Ruffini is an online strategist dedicated to helping Republicans and conservatives achieve dominance in a networked era. He has seen American politics from every vantagepoint — as a campaign staffer, activist, and analyst.

http://www.townhall.com/columnists/PatrickRuffini/2007/02/24/shhhh_the_surge_is_working
 

maineman

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you really are incapable of carrying on a discussion using your own words, aren't you?
 

maineman

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for example, you might think about eliminating sentences such as this from your cut and paste tirades to give them a greater chance of acceptability:

Patrick Ruffini is an online strategist dedicated to helping Republicans and conservatives achieve dominance in a networked era. He has seen American politics from every vantagepoint — as a campaign staffer, activist, and analyst.
 

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