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Jim Jordan Torches Garland In Opening Statements - Nadler/Democrats Refuse To Allow Video To Be Played

Rye Catcher

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Another dodge. The Democratic Party supports CRT and Defunding the Police. Hence VA went Red and NJ almost did too. People have had enough of your silly rhetoric.
The Democratic Party today seeks to honestly present the history of slavery, and subsequent to that Lincoln's Proclamation, and the history that the Southern Democrats in power immediately passed Jim Crow Laws.
Beginning with President Truman's integration of our armed forces, the Southern Democrats rebelled and Strom Thurmond ran on a third party ticket, the States' Rights Democratic Party, see:

1948 United States presidential election - Wikipedia.


Followed by:



Legal Highlight: The Civil Rights Act of 1964

"In the 1960s, Americans who knew only the potential of "equal protection of the laws" expected the president, the Congress, and the courts to fulfill the promise of the 14th Amendment. In response, all three branches of the federal government--as well as the public at large--debated a fundamental constitutional question: Does the Constitution's prohibition of denying equal protection always ban the use of racial, ethnic, or gender criteria in an attempt to bring social justice and social benefits?

"In June 1963, President John Kennedy asked Congress for a comprehensive civil rights bill, induced by massive resistance to desegregation and the murder of Medgar Evers. After Kennedy's assassination in November, President Lyndon Johnson pressed hard, with the support of Roy Wilkins and Clarence Mitchell, to secure the bill's passage the following year. In 1964, Congress passed Public Law 88-352 (78 Stat. 241). The Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex or national origin. Provisions of this civil rights act forbade discrimination on the basis of sex, as well as, race in hiring, promoting, and firing. The Act prohibited discrimination in public accommodations and federally funded programs. It also strengthened the enforcement of voting rights and the desegregation of schools.

"The Civil Rights Act of 1964 is the nation's benchmark civil rights legislation, and it continues to resonate in America"

In 1965 voting rights act:

This act was signed into law on August 6, 1965, by President Lyndon Johnson. It outlawed the discriminatory voting practices adopted in many southern states after the Civil War, including literacy tests as a prerequisite to voting.

print-friendly version

This “act to enforce the fifteenth amendment to the Constitution” was signed into law 95 years after the amendment was ratified. In those years, African Americans in the South faced tremendous obstacles to voting, including poll taxes, literacy tests, and other bureaucratic restrictions to deny them the right to vote. They also risked harassment, intimidation, economic reprisals, and physical violence when they tried to register or vote. As a result, very few African Americans were registered voters, and they had very little, if any, political power, either locally or nationally.

On April 4, 1968, civil rights leader and activist Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated in Memphis, Tennessee. Following his assassination, amid a wave of riots in more than 100 cities across the United States, President Lyndon Johnson increased pressure on Congress to pass additional civil rights legislation. Hoping for passage before King’s funeral on April 9, LBJ argued that the Civil Rights Act of 1968 would be a fitting testament to King and his legacy.

Despite the strides taken during the civil rights movement, including the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965, race-based housing patterns remained an obstacle in the late 1960s. While African American and Mexican American members of the U.S. military fought and died for their country in Vietnam, their family members at home had trouble renting or purchasing homes in residential areas because of their race or national origin. Organizations such as the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and the G.I. Forum lobbied for new fair housing legislation to be passed. NAACP Washington Director Clarence Mitchell, Jr. proved to be so effective in pushing through civil rights legislation that he was referred to as the “101st senator.”

Missing LBJ's desired deadline of King's funeral by just one day, the United States Congress passed the Civil Rights Act of 1968 on April 10—the final, great legislative achievement of the civil rights era. An expansion of the landmark Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Civil Rights Act of 1968, popularly known as the Fair Housing Act, prohibits discrimination concerning the sale, rental, or financing of housing based on race, religion, national origin, and sex.

All of these bills were supported by The New Democratic Party. None of which are supported by the 21st Century Republican Party.
 

AzogtheDefiler

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The Democratic Party today seeks to honestly present the history of slavery, and subsequent to that Lincoln's Proclamation, and the history that the Southern Democrats in power immediately passed Jim Crow Laws.
Beginning with President Truman's integration of our armed forces, the Southern Democrats rebelled and Strom Thurmond ran on a third party ticket, the States' Rights Democratic Party, see:

1948 United States presidential election - Wikipedia.


Followed by:



Legal Highlight: The Civil Rights Act of 1964

"In the 1960s, Americans who knew only the potential of "equal protection of the laws" expected the president, the Congress, and the courts to fulfill the promise of the 14th Amendment. In response, all three branches of the federal government--as well as the public at large--debated a fundamental constitutional question: Does the Constitution's prohibition of denying equal protection always ban the use of racial, ethnic, or gender criteria in an attempt to bring social justice and social benefits?

"In June 1963, President John Kennedy asked Congress for a comprehensive civil rights bill, induced by massive resistance to desegregation and the murder of Medgar Evers. After Kennedy's assassination in November, President Lyndon Johnson pressed hard, with the support of Roy Wilkins and Clarence Mitchell, to secure the bill's passage the following year. In 1964, Congress passed Public Law 88-352 (78 Stat. 241). The Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex or national origin. Provisions of this civil rights act forbade discrimination on the basis of sex, as well as, race in hiring, promoting, and firing. The Act prohibited discrimination in public accommodations and federally funded programs. It also strengthened the enforcement of voting rights and the desegregation of schools.

"The Civil Rights Act of 1964 is the nation's benchmark civil rights legislation, and it continues to resonate in America"

In 1965 voting rights act:

This act was signed into law on August 6, 1965, by President Lyndon Johnson. It outlawed the discriminatory voting practices adopted in many southern states after the Civil War, including literacy tests as a prerequisite to voting.

print-friendly version
This “act to enforce the fifteenth amendment to the Constitution” was signed into law 95 years after the amendment was ratified. In those years, African Americans in the South faced tremendous obstacles to voting, including poll taxes, literacy tests, and other bureaucratic restrictions to deny them the right to vote. They also risked harassment, intimidation, economic reprisals, and physical violence when they tried to register or vote. As a result, very few African Americans were registered voters, and they had very little, if any, political power, either locally or nationally.

On April 4, 1968, civil rights leader and activist Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated in Memphis, Tennessee. Following his assassination, amid a wave of riots in more than 100 cities across the United States, President Lyndon Johnson increased pressure on Congress to pass additional civil rights legislation. Hoping for passage before King’s funeral on April 9, LBJ argued that the Civil Rights Act of 1968 would be a fitting testament to King and his legacy.

Despite the strides taken during the civil rights movement, including the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965, race-based housing patterns remained an obstacle in the late 1960s. While African American and Mexican American members of the U.S. military fought and died for their country in Vietnam, their family members at home had trouble renting or purchasing homes in residential areas because of their race or national origin. Organizations such as the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and the G.I. Forum lobbied for new fair housing legislation to be passed. NAACP Washington Director Clarence Mitchell, Jr. proved to be so effective in pushing through civil rights

Missing LBJ's desired deadline of King's funeral by just one day, the United States Congress passed the Civil Rights Act of 1968 on April 10—the final, great legislative achievement of the civil rights era. An expansion of the landmark Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Civil Rights Act of 1968, popularly known as the Fair Housing Act, prohibits discrimination concerning the sale, rental, or financing of housing based on race, religion, national origin, and sex.

All of these bills were supported by The New Democratic Party. None of which are supported by the 21st Century Republican Party.
That is fine. What isn't fine is blaming kids now for the ills of their ancestors and separating kids by oppressed to oppressor in elementary school. Or telling kids in elementary school that they have white privilege.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=SrOCUVJnyZE&t=5sislation
 

Rye Catcher

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That is fine. What isn't fine is blaming kids now for the ills of their ancestors and separating kids by oppressed to oppressor in elementary school. Or telling kids in elementary school that they have white privilege.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=SrOCUVJnyZE&t=5sislation

You're ignoring history and laying claim by posting another's opinion are ignoring reality.

Affirmative Action came under attack by those white guys who felt they were better than black men and resented not being hired or promoted when the list came out; they didn't get what they believed was their right.

Before AA was promulgated there was the Glass Ceiling. Racism and misogyny are beyond bigotry, they are hate and that is sick.
 

AzogtheDefiler

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You're ignoring history and laying claim by posting another's opinion are ignoring reality.

Affirmative Action came under attack by those white guys who felt they were better than black men and resented not being hired or promoted when the list came out; they didn't get what they believed was their right.

Before AA was promulgated there was the Glass Ceiling. Racism and misogyny are beyond bigotry, they are hate and that is sick.
What does that have to do with anything I wrote? You leftists truly are deranged.
 

Clipper

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OKAY I first read this headline as "Jim Jordan TOUCHES Garland" and I was like.... :puke: 😲

Time for more coffee
It should have read "Jim Jordan Touches Himself". But, we already knew that.
 

jasonnfree

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Yes. Look at their past. Start with Jefferson Davis. Then "Boss" Tweed. Woodrow Wilson ,the Godfather of Income TAX. Then FDR the Communist. Then LBJ. Not to mention famous Democrats like Robert Byrd , Bull Connors ,George Wallace ,Lester Maddox. Then pervs like Bill Clinton. Epstein was a Democrat. So were the Rosenbergs. So was Alger Hiss. All Democrats are Traitors and Criminals.
Oh yea. Democrats are horrible.
Without FDR and LBJ, we wouldn't have social security and medicare. I'm waiting for republicans to name something thinks their party ever did to help the average citizen. Most of their actions were giving tax breaks to the very wealthy. FDR a communist? Give a link maybe.
 

AZrailwhale

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School board meetings are inundated with nutters talking about CRT when the school doesn't have anything to do with CRT.
They're whipped up with nutters going crazy over wearing a simple face mask as if that was the end of the world.
They're whipped up with nutters talking about a stolen election.
They're whipped up with nutters thinking troops pulling out of Afghanistan is the end of the world.
They're whipped up with nutters thinking we are turning into Venezuela.

The DoJ said they want to help catch people who have been the victims of threats and intimidation, but you guys whipped up the nutters by saying that they're going after parent's just exercising first amendment rights.

You're losing grip with reality and the fear/anger that has been pushed on you is how you're controlled.
Unless the "threats and intimidation" are done on federal property or across state lines, the DOJ has no business getting involved. They are a state or local matter. Biden and the democrats have completely forgotten the Bill of Rights even exists.
 

AZrailwhale

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Oh yea. Democrats are horrible.
Without FDR and LBJ, we wouldn't have social security and medicare. I'm waiting for republicans to name something thinks their party ever did to help the average citizen. Most of their actions were giving tax breaks to the very wealthy. FDR a communist? Give a link maybe.
Neither of which are legal under the Constitution. FDR never let the law get in the way of doing whatever he desired.
 

colfax_m

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Unless the "threats and intimidation" are done on federal property or across state lines, the DOJ has no business getting involved. They are a state or local matter. Biden and the democrats have completely forgotten the Bill of Rights even exists.
You guys are awfully triggered over something as simple as this.

It’s almost as if that’s pretext for your anger that right wing violence is being taken seriously.
 

San Souci

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Oh yea. Democrats are horrible.
Without FDR and LBJ, we wouldn't have social security and medicare. I'm waiting for republicans to name something thinks their party ever did to help the average citizen. Most of their actions were giving tax breaks to the very wealthy. FDR a communist? Give a link maybe.
LBJ had JFK killed.
 

Rye Catcher

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Neither of which are legal under the Constitution. FDR never let the law get in the way of doing whatever he desired.
You're a biddable fool; have you ever read Our Constitution?

Article I, Section 8, Clause 18:

[The Congress shall have Power . . . ] To make all Laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into Execution the foregoing Powers, and all other Powers vested by this Constitution in the Government of the United States, or in any Department or Officer thereof.

The Necessary and Proper Clause1 concludes Article I's list of Congress's enumerated powers with a general statement that Congress's powers include not only those expressly listed, but also the authority to use all means necessary and proper for executing those express powers. Under the Necessary and Proper Clause, congressional power encompasses all implied and incidental powers that are conducive to the beneficial exercise of an enumerated power.2 The Clause does not require that legislation be absolutely necessary to the exercise of federal power.3 Rather, so long as Congress's end is within the scope of federal power under the Constitution, the Necessary and Proper Clause authorizes Congress to employ any means that are appropriate and plainly adapted to the permitted end.4

The Necessary and Proper Clause was included in the Constitution in response to the shortcomings of the Articles of Confederation, which had limited federal power to only those powers expressly delegated to the United States.5 While the Framers chose to follow the Articles in enumerating a list of specific federal powers—as opposed to some general statement of federal power6—they included the Necessary and Proper Clause to make clear that Congress's power encompassed the implied power to use all appropriate means required to execute those express powers.7 The Necessary and Proper Clause was not a primary focus of debate at the Constitutional Convention itself, but its meaning quickly became a major issue in the debates over the ratification of the Constitution,8 and in the early Republic.9


The Supreme Court has interpreted the Necessary and Proper Clause as an extension of the other powers vested in the federal government, most notably Congress's enumerated Article I powers.10 Thus, whenever the Supreme Court addresses the outer limits of Congress's enumerated powers, it necessarily invokes the Necessary and Proper Clause as well, either explicitly or implicitly.11 However, the Necessary and Proper Clause is not, in itself, an independent grant of congressional power.12 Although the Necessary and Proper Clause is therefore implicated in many cases examining the extent of Congress's power under, for example, the Commerce Clause, those decisions are primarily addressed elsewhere in the Constitution Annotated, under the particular enumerated federal power at issue.13

Stop getting your education from Right Wing Talking heads on the AM Dial and TV.
 

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