Jim Crow still exists in 2019

IM2

Diamond Member
Joined
Mar 11, 2015
Messages
41,535
Reaction score
8,361
Points
2,070
And if you don't think so..

How a Jim Crow law still shapes Mississippi’s elections
By Ian Millhiser Oct 11, 2019


Jim Hood is a political unicorn. A Democrat, Hood nonetheless has won four consecutive statewide elections in the blood-red state of Mississippi — all of them for attorney general. Now he hopes to add a new line to his resume. He’s the Democratic candidate for governor in next month’s election. And the polls suggest that he’s got a real fighting chance.

But there’s a catch. Mississippi held a constitutional convention more than a century ago to, in the words of one former state governor and US senator, “eliminate the n****r from politics.” One still-remaining vestige of that convention is the unusual way the state conducts its statewide elections.

For statewide positions other than US senator, Mississippi uses a system similar to the electoral college. It’s not enough for a candidate to simply win the statewide popular vote. Rather, they must win both a majority of the popular vote and win a majority of the state’s 122 state house districts. If no candidate clears both of these hurdles, the state house chooses the winner from the top two candidates.

How a Jim Crow law still shapes Mississippi’s elections
 

Dekster

Gold Member
Joined
Dec 11, 2014
Messages
7,674
Reaction score
1,405
Points
275
It is only Jim Crow if it is a southern state. Democrats in some states still have similar rules for their primaries. It was why Hillary lost several states to Bernie but came out of them with the same or almost as many delegates as Bernie. It wasn't Jim Crowe when Hlidabeast was benefiting.
 

gulfman

Diamond Member
Joined
Dec 25, 2017
Messages
1,027
Reaction score
856
Points
1,940
When my kids were younger I asked them if they wanted to go to Disneyworld or the Jim Crow museum.They said"Jim Crow museum dad".Good kids they are.
 

hadit

Gold Member
Joined
Jul 1, 2013
Messages
24,695
Reaction score
3,417
Points
280
And if you don't think so..

How a Jim Crow law still shapes Mississippi’s elections
By Ian Millhiser Oct 11, 2019


Jim Hood is a political unicorn. A Democrat, Hood nonetheless has won four consecutive statewide elections in the blood-red state of Mississippi — all of them for attorney general. Now he hopes to add a new line to his resume. He’s the Democratic candidate for governor in next month’s election. And the polls suggest that he’s got a real fighting chance.

But there’s a catch. Mississippi held a constitutional convention more than a century ago to, in the words of one former state governor and US senator, “eliminate the n****r from politics.” One still-remaining vestige of that convention is the unusual way the state conducts its statewide elections.

For statewide positions other than US senator, Mississippi uses a system similar to the electoral college. It’s not enough for a candidate to simply win the statewide popular vote. Rather, they must win both a majority of the popular vote and win a majority of the state’s 122 state house districts. If no candidate clears both of these hurdles, the state house chooses the winner from the top two candidates.

How a Jim Crow law still shapes Mississippi’s elections
And if the democrat wins, let's be sure to complain for a very long time about how unfair it is.
 
OP
IM2

IM2

Diamond Member
Joined
Mar 11, 2015
Messages
41,535
Reaction score
8,361
Points
2,070
And if you don't think so..

How a Jim Crow law still shapes Mississippi’s elections
By Ian Millhiser Oct 11, 2019


Jim Hood is a political unicorn. A Democrat, Hood nonetheless has won four consecutive statewide elections in the blood-red state of Mississippi — all of them for attorney general. Now he hopes to add a new line to his resume. He’s the Democratic candidate for governor in next month’s election. And the polls suggest that he’s got a real fighting chance.

But there’s a catch. Mississippi held a constitutional convention more than a century ago to, in the words of one former state governor and US senator, “eliminate the n****r from politics.” One still-remaining vestige of that convention is the unusual way the state conducts its statewide elections.

For statewide positions other than US senator, Mississippi uses a system similar to the electoral college. It’s not enough for a candidate to simply win the statewide popular vote. Rather, they must win both a majority of the popular vote and win a majority of the state’s 122 state house districts. If no candidate clears both of these hurdles, the state house chooses the winner from the top two candidates.

How a Jim Crow law still shapes Mississippi’s elections
And if the democrat wins, let's be sure to complain for a very long time about how unfair it is.
Whoever wins, this law needs to be eliminated.
 
OP
IM2

IM2

Diamond Member
Joined
Mar 11, 2015
Messages
41,535
Reaction score
8,361
Points
2,070
It is only Jim Crow if it is a southern state. Democrats in some states still have similar rules for their primaries. It was why Hillary lost several states to Bernie but came out of them with the same or almost as many delegates as Bernie. It wasn't Jim Crowe when Hlidabeast was benefiting.
Bullshit.
 

Toddsterpatriot

Diamond Member
Joined
May 3, 2011
Messages
59,962
Reaction score
9,318
Points
2,030
Location
Chicago
And if you don't think so..

How a Jim Crow law still shapes Mississippi’s elections
By Ian Millhiser Oct 11, 2019


Jim Hood is a political unicorn. A Democrat, Hood nonetheless has won four consecutive statewide elections in the blood-red state of Mississippi — all of them for attorney general. Now he hopes to add a new line to his resume. He’s the Democratic candidate for governor in next month’s election. And the polls suggest that he’s got a real fighting chance.

But there’s a catch. Mississippi held a constitutional convention more than a century ago to, in the words of one former state governor and US senator, “eliminate the n****r from politics.” One still-remaining vestige of that convention is the unusual way the state conducts its statewide elections.

For statewide positions other than US senator, Mississippi uses a system similar to the electoral college. It’s not enough for a candidate to simply win the statewide popular vote. Rather, they must win both a majority of the popular vote and win a majority of the state’s 122 state house districts. If no candidate clears both of these hurdles, the state house chooses the winner from the top two candidates.

How a Jim Crow law still shapes Mississippi’s elections
Mississippi held a constitutional convention more than a century ago to, in the words of one former state governor and US senator, “eliminate the n****r from politics.”

That's awful!!!

What was the name and political party of that bastard?
 
OP
IM2

IM2

Diamond Member
Joined
Mar 11, 2015
Messages
41,535
Reaction score
8,361
Points
2,070
And if you don't think so..

How a Jim Crow law still shapes Mississippi’s elections
By Ian Millhiser Oct 11, 2019


Jim Hood is a political unicorn. A Democrat, Hood nonetheless has won four consecutive statewide elections in the blood-red state of Mississippi — all of them for attorney general. Now he hopes to add a new line to his resume. He’s the Democratic candidate for governor in next month’s election. And the polls suggest that he’s got a real fighting chance.

But there’s a catch. Mississippi held a constitutional convention more than a century ago to, in the words of one former state governor and US senator, “eliminate the n****r from politics.” One still-remaining vestige of that convention is the unusual way the state conducts its statewide elections.

For statewide positions other than US senator, Mississippi uses a system similar to the electoral college. It’s not enough for a candidate to simply win the statewide popular vote. Rather, they must win both a majority of the popular vote and win a majority of the state’s 122 state house districts. If no candidate clears both of these hurdles, the state house chooses the winner from the top two candidates.

How a Jim Crow law still shapes Mississippi’s elections
Mississippi held a constitutional convention more than a century ago to, in the words of one former state governor and US senator, “eliminate the n****r from politics.”

That's awful!!!

What was the name and political party of that bastard?
Yawn! Both parties have supported it.
 

CrusaderFrank

Diamond Member
Joined
May 20, 2009
Messages
113,582
Reaction score
25,197
Points
2,220
Location
Location, location
And if you don't think so..

How a Jim Crow law still shapes Mississippi’s elections
By Ian Millhiser Oct 11, 2019


Jim Hood is a political unicorn. A Democrat, Hood nonetheless has won four consecutive statewide elections in the blood-red state of Mississippi — all of them for attorney general. Now he hopes to add a new line to his resume. He’s the Democratic candidate for governor in next month’s election. And the polls suggest that he’s got a real fighting chance.

But there’s a catch. Mississippi held a constitutional convention more than a century ago to, in the words of one former state governor and US senator, “eliminate the n****r from politics.” One still-remaining vestige of that convention is the unusual way the state conducts its statewide elections.

For statewide positions other than US senator, Mississippi uses a system similar to the electoral college. It’s not enough for a candidate to simply win the statewide popular vote. Rather, they must win both a majority of the popular vote and win a majority of the state’s 122 state house districts. If no candidate clears both of these hurdles, the state house chooses the winner from the top two candidates.

How a Jim Crow law still shapes Mississippi’s elections
And if the democrat wins, let's be sure to complain for a very long time about how unfair it is.
Whoever wins, this law needs to be eliminated.
Why??
 

Toddsterpatriot

Diamond Member
Joined
May 3, 2011
Messages
59,962
Reaction score
9,318
Points
2,030
Location
Chicago
And if you don't think so..

How a Jim Crow law still shapes Mississippi’s elections
By Ian Millhiser Oct 11, 2019


Jim Hood is a political unicorn. A Democrat, Hood nonetheless has won four consecutive statewide elections in the blood-red state of Mississippi — all of them for attorney general. Now he hopes to add a new line to his resume. He’s the Democratic candidate for governor in next month’s election. And the polls suggest that he’s got a real fighting chance.

But there’s a catch. Mississippi held a constitutional convention more than a century ago to, in the words of one former state governor and US senator, “eliminate the n****r from politics.” One still-remaining vestige of that convention is the unusual way the state conducts its statewide elections.

For statewide positions other than US senator, Mississippi uses a system similar to the electoral college. It’s not enough for a candidate to simply win the statewide popular vote. Rather, they must win both a majority of the popular vote and win a majority of the state’s 122 state house districts. If no candidate clears both of these hurdles, the state house chooses the winner from the top two candidates.

How a Jim Crow law still shapes Mississippi’s elections
Mississippi held a constitutional convention more than a century ago to, in the words of one former state governor and US senator, “eliminate the n****r from politics.”

That's awful!!!

What was the name and political party of that bastard?
Yawn! Both parties have supported it.
Was he a Democrat?

Say it, SAY IT!!!
 

dblack

Platinum Member
Joined
May 21, 2011
Messages
34,287
Reaction score
3,407
Points
1,130
And if you don't think so..

How a Jim Crow law still shapes Mississippi’s elections
By Ian Millhiser Oct 11, 2019


Jim Hood is a political unicorn. A Democrat, Hood nonetheless has won four consecutive statewide elections in the blood-red state of Mississippi — all of them for attorney general. Now he hopes to add a new line to his resume. He’s the Democratic candidate for governor in next month’s election. And the polls suggest that he’s got a real fighting chance.

But there’s a catch. Mississippi held a constitutional convention more than a century ago to, in the words of one former state governor and US senator, “eliminate the n****r from politics.” One still-remaining vestige of that convention is the unusual way the state conducts its statewide elections.

For statewide positions other than US senator, Mississippi uses a system similar to the electoral college. It’s not enough for a candidate to simply win the statewide popular vote. Rather, they must win both a majority of the popular vote and win a majority of the state’s 122 state house districts. If no candidate clears both of these hurdles, the state house chooses the winner from the top two candidates.

How a Jim Crow law still shapes Mississippi’s elections

And if the democrat wins, let's be sure to complain for a very long time about how unfair it is.
Whoever wins, this law needs to be eliminated.
Why?
 

Butch_Coolidge

Gold Member
Joined
Jul 20, 2018
Messages
3,941
Reaction score
388
Points
170
Maybe you should road trip to Mississippi, and change the world. Wonder if those people know there’s a problem. But all whities are bad, and conspiring together. Or maybe just blame Trump.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
OP
IM2

IM2

Diamond Member
Joined
Mar 11, 2015
Messages
41,535
Reaction score
8,361
Points
2,070
And if you don't think so..

How a Jim Crow law still shapes Mississippi’s elections
By Ian Millhiser Oct 11, 2019


Jim Hood is a political unicorn. A Democrat, Hood nonetheless has won four consecutive statewide elections in the blood-red state of Mississippi — all of them for attorney general. Now he hopes to add a new line to his resume. He’s the Democratic candidate for governor in next month’s election. And the polls suggest that he’s got a real fighting chance.

But there’s a catch. Mississippi held a constitutional convention more than a century ago to, in the words of one former state governor and US senator, “eliminate the n****r from politics.” One still-remaining vestige of that convention is the unusual way the state conducts its statewide elections.

For statewide positions other than US senator, Mississippi uses a system similar to the electoral college. It’s not enough for a candidate to simply win the statewide popular vote. Rather, they must win both a majority of the popular vote and win a majority of the state’s 122 state house districts. If no candidate clears both of these hurdles, the state house chooses the winner from the top two candidates.

How a Jim Crow law still shapes Mississippi’s elections

And if the democrat wins, let's be sure to complain for a very long time about how unfair it is.
Whoever wins, this law needs to be eliminated.
Why?
Figure it out.
 
OP
IM2

IM2

Diamond Member
Joined
Mar 11, 2015
Messages
41,535
Reaction score
8,361
Points
2,070
Maybe you should road trip to Mississippi, and change the world. Wonder if those people know there’s a problem. But all whities are bad, and conspiring together. Or maybe just blame Trump.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Apparently they do.

The George Riley Impact Litigation Initiative is a ten-year initiative to provide litigation and public policy advocacy in areas related to racial and economic justice, including voting rights, housing, consumer protection, and educational access. In 2017, MCJ and Rob McDuff jointly launched the George Riley Impact Litigation Initiative, which is named in honor of longtime MCJ board member the late George Riley.

Cases Under the George Riley Impact Litigation Initiative include:

Harness v. Hosemann (S.D. MS)—suit to invalidate provision of the Mississippi Constitution of 1890 that was adopted to disenfranchise people convicted of particular offenses that were deemed to be “black crimes.” Summary judgment granted for the State. Appeal to 5th Circuit pending.

Mississippi v. Navient Corporation, Sallie Mae Bank and Navient Solutions LLC. (Chancery Court, Hinds Co, MS)—suit where we have joined the Mississippi Attorney General in challenging behavior of student loan lender and servicer. Defendants’ motion to dismiss denied.

Jackson Women’s Health Organization v. Currier (S.D. MS)—suit challenging many of the state’s abortion restrictions. Injunctions issued for both 15 week ban and heartbeat bill. 15-week ban argue in the 5th Circuit 10/7.

Thomas v. Bryant (S.D. MS)—suit challenging the district lines of one Mississippi State Senate District in the Delta to create an additional majority African American district where African American voters can elect a candidate of choice. 5th Circuit panel affirmed Judge Reeves’ decision requiring new lines for District 22, which were used in the primary and will be used in the general election in November. The 5th Circuit, on its own motion, set the case for en banc hearing in January.

Martinez v Hancock County (S.D. MS)—suit against the Hancock County Sheriff’s Department for the unlawful detention of a Hispanic family from South Carolina stopped on I-10 near the Mississippi Gulf Coast on their way to take the children’s grandmother home to Mexico. Settled—in addition to a payment to the plaintiffs, the Hancock County Sheriff’s office agreed to adopt new policies and undergo training on implicit bias to avoid racial profiling in the future.

McLemore v. Hosemann (S.D. MS)—suit challenging the provision in Mississippi’s constitution that allows the Mississippi House of Representatives to choose the winner of elections for statewide state-level offices if no candidate wins both a majority of the popular vote (as opposed to a plurality) and a majority of the house districts. Motion for preliminary injunction pending.

State v. Curtis Flowers—Motions to dismiss and for bail pending in Montgomery County Circuit Court, where Curtis Flowers faces a possible 7th trial for murder in a case where the prosecution has been unable to obtain a legally valid conviction despite six prior trials in a case that has spanned the last 22 years.

George Riley Impact Litigation Initiative | Mississippi Center for Justice
Homepage Slideshow | Mississippi Center for Justice

Your pretend world where blacks agree with continuing racism from whites doesn't exist.
 
OP
IM2

IM2

Diamond Member
Joined
Mar 11, 2015
Messages
41,535
Reaction score
8,361
Points
2,070
And if you don't think so..

How a Jim Crow law still shapes Mississippi’s elections
By Ian Millhiser Oct 11, 2019


Jim Hood is a political unicorn. A Democrat, Hood nonetheless has won four consecutive statewide elections in the blood-red state of Mississippi — all of them for attorney general. Now he hopes to add a new line to his resume. He’s the Democratic candidate for governor in next month’s election. And the polls suggest that he’s got a real fighting chance.

But there’s a catch. Mississippi held a constitutional convention more than a century ago to, in the words of one former state governor and US senator, “eliminate the n****r from politics.” One still-remaining vestige of that convention is the unusual way the state conducts its statewide elections.

For statewide positions other than US senator, Mississippi uses a system similar to the electoral college. It’s not enough for a candidate to simply win the statewide popular vote. Rather, they must win both a majority of the popular vote and win a majority of the state’s 122 state house districts. If no candidate clears both of these hurdles, the state house chooses the winner from the top two candidates.

How a Jim Crow law still shapes Mississippi’s elections
Mississippi held a constitutional convention more than a century ago to, in the words of one former state governor and US senator, “eliminate the n****r from politics.”

That's awful!!!

What was the name and political party of that bastard?
Yawn! Both parties have supported it.
Was he a Democrat?

Say it, SAY IT!!!
Both parties supported it.
 
OP
IM2

IM2

Diamond Member
Joined
Mar 11, 2015
Messages
41,535
Reaction score
8,361
Points
2,070
And if you don't think so..

How a Jim Crow law still shapes Mississippi’s elections
By Ian Millhiser Oct 11, 2019


Jim Hood is a political unicorn. A Democrat, Hood nonetheless has won four consecutive statewide elections in the blood-red state of Mississippi — all of them for attorney general. Now he hopes to add a new line to his resume. He’s the Democratic candidate for governor in next month’s election. And the polls suggest that he’s got a real fighting chance.

But there’s a catch. Mississippi held a constitutional convention more than a century ago to, in the words of one former state governor and US senator, “eliminate the n****r from politics.” One still-remaining vestige of that convention is the unusual way the state conducts its statewide elections.

For statewide positions other than US senator, Mississippi uses a system similar to the electoral college. It’s not enough for a candidate to simply win the statewide popular vote. Rather, they must win both a majority of the popular vote and win a majority of the state’s 122 state house districts. If no candidate clears both of these hurdles, the state house chooses the winner from the top two candidates.

How a Jim Crow law still shapes Mississippi’s elections
And if the democrat wins, let's be sure to complain for a very long time about how unfair it is.
Whoever wins, this law needs to be eliminated.
Why??
Figure it out.
 

Polishprince

Platinum Member
Joined
Jun 8, 2016
Messages
22,577
Reaction score
7,719
Points
360
And if you don't think so..

How a Jim Crow law still shapes Mississippi’s elections
By Ian Millhiser Oct 11, 2019


Jim Hood is a political unicorn. A Democrat, Hood nonetheless has won four consecutive statewide elections in the blood-red state of Mississippi — all of them for attorney general. Now he hopes to add a new line to his resume. He’s the Democratic candidate for governor in next month’s election. And the polls suggest that he’s got a real fighting chance.

But there’s a catch. Mississippi held a constitutional convention more than a century ago to, in the words of one former state governor and US senator, “eliminate the n****r from politics.” One still-remaining vestige of that convention is the unusual way the state conducts its statewide elections.

For statewide positions other than US senator, Mississippi uses a system similar to the electoral college. It’s not enough for a candidate to simply win the statewide popular vote. Rather, they must win both a majority of the popular vote and win a majority of the state’s 122 state house districts. If no candidate clears both of these hurdles, the state house chooses the winner from the top two candidates.

How a Jim Crow law still shapes Mississippi’s elections


70%, 7 out of 10 Mississippi governors, elected since the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 have been hardcore leftists.

Doesn't seem to be hurting the libs very much.
 

Correll

Diamond Member
Joined
Mar 16, 2015
Messages
66,605
Reaction score
10,854
Points
2,070
And if you don't think so..

How a Jim Crow law still shapes Mississippi’s elections
By Ian Millhiser Oct 11, 2019


Jim Hood is a political unicorn. A Democrat, Hood nonetheless has won four consecutive statewide elections in the blood-red state of Mississippi — all of them for attorney general. Now he hopes to add a new line to his resume. He’s the Democratic candidate for governor in next month’s election. And the polls suggest that he’s got a real fighting chance.

But there’s a catch. Mississippi held a constitutional convention more than a century ago to, in the words of one former state governor and US senator, “eliminate the n****r from politics.” One still-remaining vestige of that convention is the unusual way the state conducts its statewide elections.

For statewide positions other than US senator, Mississippi uses a system similar to the electoral college. It’s not enough for a candidate to simply win the statewide popular vote. Rather, they must win both a majority of the popular vote and win a majority of the state’s 122 state house districts. If no candidate clears both of these hurdles, the state house chooses the winner from the top two candidates.

How a Jim Crow law still shapes Mississippi’s elections

Wow. Big freaking deal. An interesting historical oddity.
 

Most reactions - Past 7 days

Forum List

Top