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How big of an issue will Marijuana be in the 2016 Federal Election?

JakeStarkey

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Put down the bong, please, and step away slowly.
 

Treeshepherd

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The issue came up at Loretta Lynch's confirmation hearing for AG.
“I can tell you that not only do I not support the legalization of marijuana, it is not the position of the Department of Justice currently...nor will it be the position should I be confirmed," Lynch said.
Lost in the sillyness at the hearing is the reality that Lynch is a War on Drugs champion, a proponent of harsh drug penalties, as well as a big capital punishment advocate and a Big Sister Orwellian Surveillance State proponent.

While Holder's office rhetorically reversed position and pledged to respect State's rights, in reality his office has continued to prosecute medical marijuana dispensaries.

The answer to the OP title question depends on circumstances. The legalization laws in CO and WA were Trojan Horses; laws poorly written (possibly with intention to thwart freedom) by bureaucrats that are bound to result in bad press and a possible reversal of momentum. That's bound to cloud common sense in regard to future legalization efforts.

Who will be the primary election winners in 2016? Rand Paul and Elizabeth Warren would not be opposed to legalization or decriminalization, I wouldn't think. Ted Cruz is a Federalist, supposedly, and has no official stance on legalization yet, but he's made some anti-pot remarks which mostly have to do with criticizing Obama. Jed Bush opposed medical marijuana in Florida.

Hillary is a Big Sis, Big State dominionist. She's also a political pragmatist. If she runs against Rand Paul, she'll probably agree with him and the majority of the country that harsh laws to stick pot smokers in jail are counter-productive. If she runs against a Conservative, she'll tack towards the right so that she doesn't appear to be soft on crime. Dems will vote for her over a social conservative no matter what her stance on marijuana ends up being.
 

Syriusly

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Moonglow

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Syriusly

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Title says all.

I think everyone will be studiously avoiding talking about it.

Why do you say that?

Because it is a lose lose for most politicians.

there are people who are against pot in a fashion that is almost religious- call it faith based.
And there are people who think pot should be treated like alcohol

Saying anything will offend one side without impressing the otherside much.
 

Treeshepherd

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Title says all.

I think everyone will be studiously avoiding talking about it.

Why do you say that?

Because it is a lose lose for most politicians.

there are people who are against pot in a fashion that is almost religious- call it faith based.
And there are people who think pot should be treated like alcohol

Saying anything will offend one side without impressing the otherside much.

A recent Gallup poll says that 58% of Americans favor legalization of marijuana. That up over 25% in the last 15 years.
http://www.gallup.com/poll/165539/first-time-americans-favor-legalizing-marijuana.asp

There could be a backslide if major problems arise in states that have legalized. But, I think most likely the % in favor of legalization will rise.

But, this is more an issue for governors than presidential candidates. If you're running for president, the winning stance is to say that states have a right to let the voters decide.
 

Moonglow

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Title says all.

I think everyone will be studiously avoiding talking about it.

Why do you say that?

Because it is a lose lose for most politicians.

there are people who are against pot in a fashion that is almost religious- call it faith based.
And there are people who think pot should be treated like alcohol

Saying anything will offend one side without impressing the otherside much.

A recent Gallup poll says that 58% of Americans favor legalization of marijuana. That up over 25% in the last 15 years.
http://www.gallup.com/poll/165539/first-time-americans-favor-legalizing-marijuana.asp

There could be a backslide if major problems arise in states that have legalized. But, I think most likely the % in favor of legalization will rise.

But, this is more an issue for governors than presidential candidates. If you're running for president, the winning stance is to say that states have a right to let the voters decide.
The states are not suppose to since in 1970 the US signed a treaty with the UN classify drugs and making them illegal for self medication and possession....The UN has complained.
The decision to allow Native American Indians the ability to grow and sell is based on the treaty the US govt. made with them does not stipulate maryjane prohibition..So they are not hindered by any other treaties signed on behalf of the USA, since the reservations are sovereign nations unto themselves...
 

Kosh

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