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How Baptists hold differing views on the resurrection of Christ and why this matters

Disir

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Early on April 4 morning, the following message appeared on the Twitter account of the Rev. Raphael Warnock, the newly elected U.S. senator from Georgia: “The meaning of Easter is more transcendent than the resurrection of Jesus Christ. Whether you are Christian or not, through a commitment to helping others we are able to save ourselves.”

He later deleted the tweet, but not before strong reaction from both conservative and progressive Christians. Some conservative Christians denounced Warnock as a “heretic” for, in their view, downplaying the story of Jesus’ bodily resurrection and for claiming that humans can save themselves rather than God, who alone saves humans from their sins. Other Christians came to Warnock’s defense, citing his credentials as a theologian and pastor of Atlanta’s Ebenezer Baptist Church. Rather than condemn his message, they applauded him for sharing a more humanistic message that included non-Christians.

As a Baptist minister and theologian myself, I believe it is important to understand how Baptists hold differing views on the meaning of the Resurrection.

This is pretty interesting article that outlines the differences. I would be interested in listening to who here believes which view. Providing nobody gets all bent out of shape.
 

Damaged Eagle

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Sorry. Pantheist not Baptist.

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lg325

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First time I have heard of this. I grew up going to an Independent, Fundamental, Missionary Baptist Church . Completed a two year class of KJV study with Hermeneutics and Apologetics. The so called liberal view seeks to change scripture to fit the times. Which means they do not really believe the account of the Apostles. The traditional view is the only true view or scripture will keep changing to be accepted by the population at the time and it is the Christians job to get the population to accept scripture the way it is. I will add because some call them selves Baptist doesn't mean they are.
 

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Early on April 4 morning, the following message appeared on the Twitter account of the Rev. Raphael Warnock, the newly elected U.S. senator from Georgia: “The meaning of Easter is more transcendent than the resurrection of Jesus Christ. Whether you are Christian or not, through a commitment to helping others we are able to save ourselves.”

He later deleted the tweet, but not before strong reaction from both conservative and progressive Christians. Some conservative Christians denounced Warnock as a “heretic” for, in their view, downplaying the story of Jesus’ bodily resurrection and for claiming that humans can save themselves rather than God, who alone saves humans from their sins. Other Christians came to Warnock’s defense, citing his credentials as a theologian and pastor of Atlanta’s Ebenezer Baptist Church. Rather than condemn his message, they applauded him for sharing a more humanistic message that included non-Christians.

As a Baptist minister and theologian myself, I believe it is important to understand how Baptists hold differing views on the meaning of the Resurrection.

This is pretty interesting article that outlines the differences. I would be interested in listening to who here believes which view. Providing nobody gets all bent out of shape.
With respect to religion... regardless of what someone says, it's pretty likely that whatever they say will ruffle someone's feathers.
 

my2¢

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My, that is quite a different view than the other denominations that I'm familiar with (and follow) - where the belief is that without the resurrection Christianity is meaningless and what sets Christianity apart is God's grace.

Interesting, thanks for sharing.
 
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Disir

Disir

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Early on April 4 morning, the following message appeared on the Twitter account of the Rev. Raphael Warnock, the newly elected U.S. senator from Georgia: “The meaning of Easter is more transcendent than the resurrection of Jesus Christ. Whether you are Christian or not, through a commitment to helping others we are able to save ourselves.”

He later deleted the tweet, but not before strong reaction from both conservative and progressive Christians. Some conservative Christians denounced Warnock as a “heretic” for, in their view, downplaying the story of Jesus’ bodily resurrection and for claiming that humans can save themselves rather than God, who alone saves humans from their sins. Other Christians came to Warnock’s defense, citing his credentials as a theologian and pastor of Atlanta’s Ebenezer Baptist Church. Rather than condemn his message, they applauded him for sharing a more humanistic message that included non-Christians.

As a Baptist minister and theologian myself, I believe it is important to understand how Baptists hold differing views on the meaning of the Resurrection.

This is pretty interesting article that outlines the differences. I would be interested in listening to who here believes which view. Providing nobody gets all bent out of shape.
With respect to religion... regardless of what someone says, it's pretty likely that whatever they say will ruffle someone's feathers.
I know but I hope to avoid that.
 

norwegen

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To my mind, Jesus was resurrected twice, according to the New Testemant.

First on the Cross in Spirit. Moments after God forsook him and he became a curse, he committed his spirit to God, whom he once again called his father (Lk 23:46).

Second in the tomb corporeally. No one has ever found his body because it appears to have transformed over a course of forty days. Immediately after this resurrection, even those who knew him intimately had difficulty recognizing him. He was appearing to people in a different form. As the days passed, Saul (later Paul) didn't recognize him as a even man but as a haze of light. And of course, as the epistles say, his body ended up being the church.

The epistles say explicitly that Jesus united heaven and earth, and Christ's resurrection seems to correlate to that. His body transformed to unite heaven and earth.

I think the relatively recent liberal Christian idea that to help others is to save yourself is just wrong and misses the point. It basically condemns the objects benevolence, or those who are unable to help others.
 

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This is pretty interesting article that outlines the differences.
Doesn't it boil down to some doubt the miraculous? Thomas Jefferson is a great example of this. Is this worth a religious quarrel? Can those who accept miracles accept those who cannot (and vice-versa). What Rev. Warnock's words recalled to me is the Greatest Commandment, and the second greatest. Great things happen when we live by these two commandments. Jesus' life, death, and resurrection is a great testimony of this.
 
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Disir

Disir

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This is pretty interesting article that outlines the differences.
Doesn't it boil down to some doubt the miraculous? Thomas Jefferson is a great example of this. Is this worth a religious quarrel? Can those who accept miracles accept those who cannot (and vice-versa). What Rev. Warnock's words recalled to me is the Greatest Commandment, and the second greatest. Great things happen when we live by these two commandments. Jesus' life, death, and resurrection is a great testimony of this.
Jefferson is a fantabulous example.
 

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