Hispanic students vanish from Alabama schools

Tank

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Hispanic students have started vanishing from Alabama public schools in the wake of a court ruling that upheld the state's tough new law cracking down on illegal immigration.

Education officials say scores of immigrant families have withdrawn their children from classes or kept them home this week, afraid that sending the kids to school would draw attention from authorities.

Hispanic students vanish from Alabama schools
 

C_Clayton_Jones

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Hispanic students vanish from Alabama schools
Just as the law’s authors intended.

Hispanic families will either keep their children from school or go to another state.

The irony is, the supposed intent of this component of the law was to gather information as to the number of undocumented students attending Alabama schools.

Education officials say scores of immigrant families have withdrawn their children from classes or kept them home this week, afraid that sending the kids to school would draw attention from authorities.
The law also stipulated that the information gathered as to undocumented students was not to be given to Federal officials such as DHS.

It was composed to not violate Plyler.

So again, it’s having the intended effect of being a de facto ban on undocumented students attending public school.
 

percysunshine

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"Hispanic students have started vanishing from Alabama public schools "

The government should stop this now.....some how...

...maybe by issuing mandatory anti-vanishing skin cream to all students.
 

waltky

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You can bet Mexico ain't sendin' any money to our schools to pay for education expenses for their kids...
:eusa_eh:
Alabama immigration law leaves schools gripped by uncertainty
September 30, 2011 - A judge upheld a provision in the Alabama immigration law that forces public schools to check the immigration status of new students. Schools are scrambling to determine the impact.
Thursday Alabama became the first state in the nation to require public schools to check the immigration status of children when they enroll. A judge’s ruling Wednesday upheld several portions of Alabama’s tough new immigration law, including the section on public-school enrollment. Advocates of the law say it doesn’t block enrollment in schools, but simply enables the state to track the number of illegal-immigrant students and calculate the costs associated with educating them. Opponents argue that in the broader context of the immigration-enforcement law, the school provision will serve as a barrier for many families and end up denying innocent children their constitutional right to a public education.

Civil rights and immigrant advocacy groups are already planning their appeals, but in the meantime, parents and educators are trying to sort out exactly how the law will play out in schools. “This will have an incredibly chilling effect on children and on parents,” says Mary Bauer, legal director of the Southern Poverty Law Center, one of the groups challenging the law in court. Coupled with other parts of the law, “it turns school officials and other government officials into, kind of, immigration agents, and that’s a terrible message for kids and families.” For example, parts of the law require government officials to report illegal immigrants, says Ms. Bauer, so “there’s a real risk that the law will be read to require schools to make reports of undocumented individuals,” she says. But state officials have decried what they call "fear-mongering" among critics.

What the law does

Effective Thursday, schools are to check birth certificates only when a child is enrolling in an Alabama school for the first time. If officials determine the child isn’t in the US lawfully or if a birth certificate is not presented, they then must ask the parent or guardian to provide other documentation or sign an affidavit about the citizenship or immigration status of the student. If that document doesn't arrive within 30 days, the school records that child as "enrolled without birth certificate" in the state data system. The law doesn’t require schools to report students’ names when counting up the number who don’t have legal documentation.

“We want to put a stop to the fear-mongering,” said Larry Craven, Alabama's interim superintendent of Education, at a press conference Thursday afternoon. “No student should be denied enrollment for not providing a birth certificate.” That message does not seem to be getting through to many immigrant families, though. Some illegal-immigrant parents whose children are citizens have already said they plan to leave, making comments like, “we don’t want them to take away our children,” says Dawn DuPree Kelley, longtime principal of Greenwood Elementary Schools in the Jefferson County School System.

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waltky

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Hillary gonna replace `em with Iranians...
:eusa_eh:
Hillary Clinton: 'I'm Trying to Increase the Number of Visas’ for Iranian Students
October 27, 2011 - Secretary of State Hillary Clinton told BBC Persia Wednesday that the State Department plans to set up a "virtual embassy" in Tehran by the end of the year to answer questions about how Iranians can study or travel in the United States.
"I'm trying to increase the number of visas for students so that we have more Iranian students coming to study here. We’re trying to reach out to the Iranian people, and we’ve tried to reach out to the government, just not very successfully," she said in an interview with BBC Persia's Bahman Kalbasi. Clinton said the U.S. wants to have "better relations" with the Iranian people and also with an Iranian government "that is responsive to its own people" and give more than lip-service to democracy.

Clinton said it is one of her "highest priorities" to help the Iranian people overcome the regime's efforts to jam, filter and block Internet and satellite TV communications in Iran. “We’re doing a lot of work to try to come up with technologies that can circumvent the jamming and the interruptions and the tracking that the regime are engaged in right now. We are providing technology, some of which is more effective than others. We are certainly training people, both outside and inside, to be able to use the technology to circumvent,” she said.

"I’ve spoken out repeatedly about the right of people to have access to the Internet. It is freedom of speech and expression and assembly, values that we think every human being is entitled to,” Clinton added. Clinton said U.S. efforts to break through the regime's "electronic curtain" are sometimes successful, but only until Iran's leaders catch up with the technology. "But I want to assure your viewers that we are committed to doing everything we can to provide as much communication freedom inside and outside of Iran to people trying to speak out for their rights as possible."

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Wolfmoon

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"In an attempt to calm fears that the law may lead to arrests, the letter tells parents immigration information will be used only to gather statistics."

And then it will be easier to deport them in big groups later.

I wonder how much those chicken plucking jobs pay. The Americans use to do those jobs before the illegal aliens took lower wages and the employers hired the illegal alien employees to make more $ profit $.

What people don't understand is that the employers pay the illegal aliens just enough money for the illegal aliens to qualify for welfare assistance for their Anchor Babies. It's quite a scam on the American taxpayers.

The illegals work and receive spending money from their jobs and then the government subsidizes their housing, food and medical bills at the taxpayer’s expense. Then they educate their children for free and feed them free school lunches. They even get free baby-sitting for the children while the parents are at work. Some of the illegal aliens even get gas money and money to pay their utility bills from welfare. And they don’t even have to speak English.

People have got to stop feeling sorry for these illegal alien invaders! We have to take care of America's needs first! Millions of Americans are in great need. Demand deportation of all illegal alien invaders.
 
R

rdean

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Take a look at Georgia. Costing farmers a billions dollars. Ruining the states economy. Wonder how the Republicans will do in Alabama? Seems they are like Midas, only everything they try to fix they turn to shit. Their only solution is to destroy it.
 

waltky

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Dey just keep comin' an' comin' - like a cloud o' locusts...
:eusa_eh:
More foreign students studying in USA
13 Nov.`11 - International students and their dependents contributed more than $20 billion to the U.S. economy last year as record numbers of foreigners enrolled in U.S. colleges and universities, reports to be released today show. The numbers of U.S. students earning college credit abroad also is on the rise.
The number of international students at U.S. colleges and universities rose 4.7% to 723,277 during the 2010-11 academic year, says an annual report by the Institute of International Education (IIE), which has tracked data since 1949. Enrollments of international students have overcome a four-year period of flat or declining growth that began in 2002-03 and reflected concerns about safety and U.S. immigration policies after the 9/11 terrorist attacks. Enrollments have been on the upswing since 2006-07 and grew 32% over the past decade, IIE data show.

The number of U.S. students earning college credit abroad also increased, by 3.9% in the 2009-10 academic year, the latest year for which data are available, IIE said. The previous year, the number of U.S. students going abroad had dipped slightly for the first time. State Department officials viewed increases in both directions as evidence that earlier declines were short-term trends. "Young people who study abroad gain the global skills necessary to create solutions to 21st-century challenges," said Ann Stock, assistant secretary of State. "In turn, international students globalize our campuses and communities."

China, the top country of origin for international students, sent 157,558 undergraduate and graduate students to the USA, up 23% from the previous year. Among the top five sending countries, which together account for more than half of all international students, enrollments from South Korea increased by 1.7%. But U.S. schools saw drops from India (down 1%), Canada (2.1%) and Taiwan (7%). Year-to-year fluctuation among countries is typical, often dictated by factors such as the economic or political climate and natural disasters, IIE President Allan Goodman says.

According to the Commerce Department, international students contribute more than $21 billion to the U.S. economy through tuition and living expenses, which include room and board, supplies, transportation and health insurance and support for dependents. An analysis of economic benefits published today by NAFSA: Association of International Educators provides a slightly more conservative estimate, a net of about $20.23 billion. The analysis, conducted by Jason Baumgartner of Indiana University, found that nearly $28 billion in spending by foreign students was offset by $7.7 billion in U.S. support such as funding from a U.S. college, the U.S. government or a private sponsor.

Source
 

waltky

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Granny says dat's good news...
:cool:
Poor economy slows Hispanic birthrate
27 Nov.`11 - The number of babies born to Hispanics dropped below 1 million in 2010, a nearly 11% drop since 2007 that reflects the tough times.
Fewer people of all backgrounds are having babies because of economic concerns but the sharpest drop is among Hispanics, a booming population that contributes almost a quarter of all U.S. births and half of its population growth. "Hispanic fertility is dropping like a stone," says Kenneth Johnson, demographer for the University of New Hampshire's Carsey Institute. Hispanic birthrates tumbled 17.6% in three years — from 97.4 births per 1,000 women ages 15 to 44 to 80.3 last year, according to preliminary 2010 data released this month by the National Center for Health Statistics. Non-Hispanic whites still deliver most U.S. births. Their birthrates fell too, but at a much slower pace — down 3.7% to 58.7 per 1,000 women in 2010.

The dramatic decline in births to Hispanics, who still have the highest fertility rates, raises the specter of a long-term drop in the nation's overall fertility — now higher than that of most other developed nations. It also crystallizes the impact of the economic downturn on Hispanics. "It's hard to ignore that Hispanics have been one of the hardest-hit groups," says Gretchen Livingston, senior researcher at the Pew Research Center and author of a recent report on declining birthrates in a down economy. No one knows whether the trend will last. A lower birth rate may have a significant impact on areas that would be losing population except for Hispanic growth. In 9% of the nation's 3,141 counties, mostly rural areas, the population would have declined if Hispanics had not moved in and had babies, Johnson says.

Births to Hispanics in Texas fell 7.5% since 2007 — a drop so significant that Hispanic births went from being the majority (50.2%) to less than half (48.9%), Johnson's analysis shows. In Florida, Hispanic births dropped 15.9% and in California, they were down 7.3%. Steven Camarota of the Center for Immigration Studies which favors controlled immigration, says lower birthrates could benefit some poor families. "Given the very high rates of poverty among Hispanic children, small families might make it easier for parents to provide for their children," he says.

Source
 

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