What's new
US Message Board 🦅 Political Discussion Forum

Register a free account today to become a member! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!

Guns (firearms) & Ammo (maybe other weapons as well)

Canon Shooter

Diamond Member
Joined
Jan 7, 2020
Messages
9,697
Reaction score
8,246
Points
2,138
Did you read the full article linked, to which I only excerpted the opening paragraphs?

I didn't need to, as the part I was commenting about was in your OP.

All I was saying was that, although it may not be a preferred self defense round by John Q. Public, if someone's coming at you and you start shooting them in the chest with a .22, they're going to back off...
 

M14 Shooter

The Light of Truth
Joined
Sep 26, 2007
Messages
28,425
Reaction score
4,534
Points
290
Location
Where I can see you, but you can't see me
A few hundred yards no way, 100 yards max maybe 150 yards on a good day. That round doesn't have the ass behind it to be consistent for a few hundred yards.
Heaven forbid the target is moving at all.
We shot some 22LR at steel from 300yds.
One we had the elevation dialed in, it would hit more often than not, but you could play a hand of euchre during the flight.
And you'd never hear the hit, just see the impact.
 

Mac-7

Diamond Member
Joined
Oct 9, 2019
Messages
33,042
Reaction score
22,905
Points
2,865
Not seeing a thread for the nuts-n-bolts of the this area's topics, here is one more focused on the mechanics.
..........

Ruger LCP II .22 LR Ammo Testing​

...
By: Warren Gray

Copyright © 2021

“What counts is not necessarily the size of the dog in the fight — it’s the size of the fight in the dog.” — President Dwight D. Eisenhower, 1958.

“We could get twice as many hits in the same amount of time with the .22 LR. There were also fewer misses.” — Edward “Ed” Head, Operations Manager, Gunsite Academy, AZ, October 2010.

The ultra-compact, Ruger Lite-Rack LCP II in .22 Long Rifle was introduced in December 2019, according to the Ruger web site, as “a low-recoil pistol with an easy-to-manipulate slide that shoots comfortably regardless of your hand size or strength...as a training tool...or as a concealed-carry option.”

While many people mistakenly think that the .22 LR cartridge is not a suitable, self-defense, pistol round, Gunpowder Magazine published an article that I wrote on “.22 LR Self-Defense Ammo Testing” on February 11, 2020, in which I tested seven different .22 LR loads in wet, natural, modeling clay to reasonably simulate the terminal, ballistic effects of a close-range, shooting incident, with some pleasantly-surprising results.

The test handgun for that article was a Walther P22Q target pistol with a 3.4-inch barrel, usually chosen as my lightweight, trail gun when hiking in the forests. But, having recently acquired a Ruger LCP II (#13705) in .22 LR as a very small, concealment or backup pistol with a 2.75-inch barrel, I realized that it may be useful to test this tiny, self-defense gun in a similar manner, firing selected ammunition into wet clay blocks to visibly demonstrate the close-range penetration, expansion, and temporary-wound-cavity potential of each round.

While a 9mm or .45 ACP handgun is definitely a better choice for serious, self-defense situations, these weapons are usually fairly large and difficult to conceal, especially in the summertime, when we wear very light clothing for comfort. The Ruger LCP II is certainly small and quite concealable under most circumstances, and weighs a mere 12.3 ounces (only three-quarters of a pound) when fully loaded with 11 rounds of ammunition (10 rounds in the magazine, and one in the chamber.)

Chris Baker of Lucky Gunner wrote on April 29, 2020, that, “When we get into the realm of 12-ounce, pocket pistols carried for self-defense, something chambered in .22 (LR) makes a lot of sense...the LCP (II) easily wins the title for the best itty-bitty, .22 pocket pistol. That’s the gun you have on you when you can’t or don’t want to carry around a real gun...they don’t make a 9mm this small, and if they did, I wouldn’t want to shoot it...the .22 is faster (than the .380 version)...the recoil is negligible...I’m inclined to recommend (that) people just skip the .380 altogether and carry the .22.”

Jon Wayne Taylor added in his LCP II .22 LR review for The Truth About Guns exactly one month later, that, “One of the greatest features of the LCP line is that they are tiny. You can carry them anywhere, so you are more likely to carry them everywhere. That’s a good thing...While it’s small and might not be for every shooter, the big thing the little gun has going for it is that it’s possible for almost anyone to operate this gun safely.”

A .22 LR Ruger may not be ideal for self-defense against humans, but it’s certainly much better than a rock, a stick, or even a knife, and no one wants to be shot with any caliber. Statistically, an armed attacker usually flees the scene approximately 92 percent of the time, as soon as a law-abiding citizen draws a pistol, without firing a shot, but in that very rare instance in which they stand their ground, your tiny LCP II will have to suffice. Is it enough gun for a lethal encounter?
...
I once owned a ruger .22 auto and it NEVER misfired no matter how cheap the ammo
 

justinacolmena

Gold Member
Joined
Oct 9, 2017
Messages
9,411
Reaction score
2,884
Points
210
Location
alaska, usa
I once owned a ruger .22 auto and it NEVER misfired no matter how cheap the ammo
That's the ammo, not the gun. It's rimfire. The firing pin strikes the rim of that brass cartridge, and the explosive primer goes off and ignites the gunpowder which propels the bullet through the barrel and out the muzzle. So you never personally ran into a batch of bad ammo. Bully for you, but don't be such a gun-grabbing bullying police-officer suck-dick dumbass about it.
 

Mac-7

Diamond Member
Joined
Oct 9, 2019
Messages
33,042
Reaction score
22,905
Points
2,865
That's the ammo, not the gun. It's rimfire. The firing pin strikes the rim of that brass cartridge, and the explosive primer goes off and ignites the gunpowder which propels the bullet through the barrel and out the muzzle. So you never personally ran into a batch of bad ammo. Bully for you, but don't be such a gun-grabbing bullying police-officer suck-dick dumbass about it.
When I do get occasional jams in a Sig .22 but not in the ruger I blame it on the gun

To be clear the Sig is reliable too, just not quite as good as the ruger
 

justinacolmena

Gold Member
Joined
Oct 9, 2017
Messages
9,411
Reaction score
2,884
Points
210
Location
alaska, usa
When I do get occasional jams in a Sig .22 but not in the ruger I blame it on the gun

To be clear the Sig is reliable too, just not quite as good as the ruger
A jam is the gun. Stuck slider mechanism or something, then. Not a brass cartridge of ammunition that was actually struck by the firing pin and failed to go off.
 

Mac-7

Diamond Member
Joined
Oct 9, 2019
Messages
33,042
Reaction score
22,905
Points
2,865
A jam is the gun. Stuck slider mechanism or something, then. Not a brass cartridge of ammunition that was actually struck by the firing pin and failed to go off.
Rimfire ammo is more difficult to ignite than centerfire

And the ruger was better at not malfunctioning than other .22 autos in my experience
 

Rigby5

Gold Member
Joined
Apr 23, 2017
Messages
17,077
Reaction score
5,264
Points
265
Location
New Mexico
12428055_02_ruger_lcp_ii_lite_rack_13705_640.jpg


Saw it listed at $370.
 

Rigby5

Gold Member
Joined
Apr 23, 2017
Messages
17,077
Reaction score
5,264
Points
265
Location
New Mexico
.22 LR is good at penetration, and .22 magnum is good even for kevlar.
 

Batcat

Diamond Member
Joined
Aug 29, 2020
Messages
2,750
Reaction score
2,629
Points
1,938
Not seeing a thread for the nuts-n-bolts of the this area's topics, here is one more focused on the mechanics.
..........

Ruger LCP II .22 LR Ammo Testing​

...
By: Warren Gray

Copyright © 2021

“What counts is not necessarily the size of the dog in the fight — it’s the size of the fight in the dog.” — President Dwight D. Eisenhower, 1958.

“We could get twice as many hits in the same amount of time with the .22 LR. There were also fewer misses.” — Edward “Ed” Head, Operations Manager, Gunsite Academy, AZ, October 2010.

The ultra-compact, Ruger Lite-Rack LCP II in .22 Long Rifle was introduced in December 2019, according to the Ruger web site, as “a low-recoil pistol with an easy-to-manipulate slide that shoots comfortably regardless of your hand size or strength...as a training tool...or as a concealed-carry option.”

While many people mistakenly think that the .22 LR cartridge is not a suitable, self-defense, pistol round, Gunpowder Magazine published an article that I wrote on “.22 LR Self-Defense Ammo Testing” on February 11, 2020, in which I tested seven different .22 LR loads in wet, natural, modeling clay to reasonably simulate the terminal, ballistic effects of a close-range, shooting incident, with some pleasantly-surprising results.

The test handgun for that article was a Walther P22Q target pistol with a 3.4-inch barrel, usually chosen as my lightweight, trail gun when hiking in the forests. But, having recently acquired a Ruger LCP II (#13705) in .22 LR as a very small, concealment or backup pistol with a 2.75-inch barrel, I realized that it may be useful to test this tiny, self-defense gun in a similar manner, firing selected ammunition into wet clay blocks to visibly demonstrate the close-range penetration, expansion, and temporary-wound-cavity potential of each round.

While a 9mm or .45 ACP handgun is definitely a better choice for serious, self-defense situations, these weapons are usually fairly large and difficult to conceal, especially in the summertime, when we wear very light clothing for comfort. The Ruger LCP II is certainly small and quite concealable under most circumstances, and weighs a mere 12.3 ounces (only three-quarters of a pound) when fully loaded with 11 rounds of ammunition (10 rounds in the magazine, and one in the chamber.)

Chris Baker of Lucky Gunner wrote on April 29, 2020, that, “When we get into the realm of 12-ounce, pocket pistols carried for self-defense, something chambered in .22 (LR) makes a lot of sense...the LCP (II) easily wins the title for the best itty-bitty, .22 pocket pistol. That’s the gun you have on you when you can’t or don’t want to carry around a real gun...they don’t make a 9mm this small, and if they did, I wouldn’t want to shoot it...the .22 is faster (than the .380 version)...the recoil is negligible...I’m inclined to recommend (that) people just skip the .380 altogether and carry the .22.”

Jon Wayne Taylor added in his LCP II .22 LR review for The Truth About Guns exactly one month later, that, “One of the greatest features of the LCP line is that they are tiny. You can carry them anywhere, so you are more likely to carry them everywhere. That’s a good thing...While it’s small and might not be for every shooter, the big thing the little gun has going for it is that it’s possible for almost anyone to operate this gun safely.”

A .22 LR Ruger may not be ideal for self-defense against humans, but it’s certainly much better than a rock, a stick, or even a knife, and no one wants to be shot with any caliber. Statistically, an armed attacker usually flees the scene approximately 92 percent of the time, as soon as a law-abiding citizen draws a pistol, without firing a shot, but in that very rare instance in which they stand their ground, your tiny LCP II will have to suffice. Is it enough gun for a lethal encounter?
...
The problem with the .22 long rifle round is that you often get a misfire with the round. The chances of that happening with a rimfire round in my experience is much higher than that of a center fire round.


 

Rigby5

Gold Member
Joined
Apr 23, 2017
Messages
17,077
Reaction score
5,264
Points
265
Location
New Mexico
The problem with the .22 long rifle round is that you often get a misfire with the round. The chances of that happening with a rimfire round in my experience is much higher than that of a center fire round.


I don't know about that?
I usually start target practice with a .22, to warm up, get used to the sound/recoil, regulate breathing, practice body stance, etc.
I then only move on the more expensive ammunition for the final ending of the target practice.
So I have shot much more .22 than anything else.
And of the many bricks of .22 that I have purchased and fired, I have never had any misfire.
In fact, I have only had 1 dud in my life, and that was an army surplus 9 mm, that likely only went off on a primer, and lodged in the barrel.
I did not know it and fired the next round, bulging the barrel of the Browing Hi-Power.
Luckily it did not burst.
Dumbest thing I ever did.
 

Batcat

Diamond Member
Joined
Aug 29, 2020
Messages
2,750
Reaction score
2,629
Points
1,938
I don't know about that?
I usually start target practice with a .22, to warm up, get used to the sound/recoil, regulate breathing, practice body stance, etc.
I then only move on the more expensive ammunition for the final ending of the target practice.
So I have shot much more .22 than anything else.
And of the many bricks of .22 that I have purchased and fired, I have never had any misfire.
In fact, I have only had 1 dud in my life, and that was an army surplus 9 mm, that likely only went off on a primer, and lodged in the barrel.
I did not know it and fired the next round, bulging the barrel of the Browing Hi-Power.
Luckily it did not burst.
Dumbest thing I ever did.
You have good luck. I usually get at least one dud round in a box of 100 .22 long rifle rounds.
 

miketex

Diamond Member
Joined
Dec 25, 2015
Messages
95,992
Reaction score
38,913
Points
2,330
Next time someone tells you that, ask them if you can shoot them , just once, in the chest with a .22 LR...
Back in the 70's there was this TV show called "That's Incredable", hosted by John Davidson. One time I was watching it and they had a man on that was going to demonstrate a bullet proof vest, by allowing hislef to be shot with a 22 lr caliber rifle while wearing the vest. I watched and it was clear that none of these idiots had a clue. The guy loaded the rifle and asked the idiot if he was ready and he said he was.

He shot the guy in the chest, and the vest worked. However, it did nothing to cancel the kinetic energy of the bullet. He dropped to his knees proclaiming "Goddamn, Goddamn!", as he gasped for air. I laughed my ass off.
 

Otis Mayfield

Diamond Member
Joined
Sep 17, 2021
Messages
2,450
Reaction score
2,369
Points
1,893
The ammo is cheap so you can target practice a lot and build up your accuracy.

There's almost no kick so it doesn't mess with your accuracy the way a 44 magnum does.

The guns and ammo are of a lighter weight, making it easier to carry.

The only real downside I can think of is that if someone is enraged enough to beat you to death, you need a disabling shot to stop them, and that's harder to do with a 22. But such attacks are rare, for civilians anyway.
 

USMB Server Goals

Total amount
$145.00
Goal
$350.00

New Topics

Most reactions - Past 7 days

Forum List

Top