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Joz

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Here you go, Honey.

Glock 19 & MP5A3
 

manu1959

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Mr. P

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I really want one! Skip the suppression stuff, I don't think it's legal here. Just give me the 19!!!!!! Third generation of course.:tng:
 
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J

Joz

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Looks like a stainless barrel? How does the suppressor fasten?
This is what I received from the guy who owns it.

The suppressor is attached on the threaded barrel. It is an aftermarket barrel threaded by KKM industries. There are other barrel threaders such as Bar-Sto and Jarvis, but I had no problems with my other KKM barrels. It’s just an extended and threaded match barrel that is drop in. Drop in barrels do not need a gunsmith for fitting, hence the name drop in. KKM and other barrel makers provide a wide variety of applications. They have done my Sig and my 1911. Very nice barrels but pricey. You are looking to start at 200, depending on application. My Gl9 barrel was 261 out the door.

Depending on what state you live in, threaded barrels are a no-no. I would check your local laws to see if it is legal. For example, NY, NJ, DE, and other states do not allow any firearms with a threaded barrel; it is a state law, not a federal one.
 

glockmail

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This is what I received from the guy who owns it.

The suppressor is attached on the threaded barrel. It is an aftermarket barrel threaded by KKM industries. There are other barrel threaders such as Bar-Sto and Jarvis, but I had no problems with my other KKM barrels. It’s just an extended and threaded match barrel that is drop in. Drop in barrels do not need a gunsmith for fitting, hence the name drop in. KKM and other barrel makers provide a wide variety of applications. They have done my Sig and my 1911. Very nice barrels but pricey. You are looking to start at 200, depending on application. My Gl9 barrel was 261 out the door.

Depending on what state you live in, threaded barrels are a no-no. I would check your local laws to see if it is legal. For example, NY, NJ, DE, and other states do not allow any firearms with a threaded barrel; it is a state law, not a federal one.

I was aware of .22LR drop ins but never heard of this before. It makes perfect sense.

Interesting. One could purchase a drop in barrel for cash, or even make a crude one, and together with a home-made firing pin use it in a crime and get rid of the evidence. Together with pre-frag bullets this may be an evidence-free weapon.
 

Mr. P

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I was aware of .22LR drop ins but never heard of this before. It makes perfect sense.

Interesting. One could purchase a drop in barrel for cash, or even make a crude one, and together with a home-made firing pin use it in a crime and get rid of the evidence. Together with pre-frag bullets this may be an evidence-free weapon.

We called that a "zip gun". Way easier than you may think to make.:D
 

Mr. P

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I think a lot of those either never went off or exploded in the shooters hand. But this would be an actual glock. The barrel part is very simple, could probably be made in a lathe.

I wouldn't do it on a glock. Factory ok, homemade, no way.
 

dilloduck

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I think a lot of those either never went off or exploded in the shooters hand. But this would be an actual glock. The barrel part is very simple, could probably be made in a lathe.

Drop-forging one would be a bitch.
 

Mr. P

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I dunno. This looks like it would be easy to make on a lathe, along with a grinder and a dremel.

Have you heard of the glock Ka boom issue?
That's just from ammo. Go make yer own part and in my opinion, yer hangin it way out there.:eek:
 

glockmail

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Have you heard of the glock Ka boom issue?
That's just from ammo. Go make yer own part and in my opinion, yer hangin it way out there.:eek:
You are talking to someone who used to do front end alignments using strings, some oak blocks, and a carpenter's level, and I was dead on with the results.

With regards to the gun barrel, I probably would not “try this at home”, as my knowledge of metallurgy is lacking. But I’m sure that I could if I set my mind to it, hardening the steel using a MAPPs gas torch and a can of 10 weight oil, and trying it out remotely with the gun in a vise and a string on the trigger.

When I was in college I read a book called Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, or something like that. I remember on passage when the author fixed a set of loose handlebars on a BMW. It’s owner was well pleased with the speed and cost of the repair, until he learned that it was done using two aluminum strips, as shims, cut from a beer can.

I also learned a lot by watching Roy Underhill. I actually met the guy once. He taught me how to make chisels out of old saw blades, as well as how to sharpen them.
 

Mr. P

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You are talking to someone who used to do front end alignments using strings, some oak blocks, and a carpenter's level, and I was dead on with the results.

With regards to the gun barrel, I probably would not “try this at home”, as my knowledge of metallurgy is lacking. But I’m sure that I could if I set my mind to it, hardening the steel using a MAPPs gas torch and a can of 10 weight oil, and trying it out remotely with the gun in a vise and a string on the trigger.

When I was in college I read a book called Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, or something like that. I remember on passage when the author fixed a set of loose handlebars on a BMW. It’s owner was well pleased with the speed and cost of the repair, until he learned that it was done using two aluminum strips, as shims, cut from a beer can.

I also learned a lot by watching Roy Underhill. I actually met the guy once. He taught me how to make chisels out of old saw blades, as well as how to sharpen them.

I loved watching that guy!!!
 

007

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Mr. P

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Nah, just a little sharin'. I thought that was one sexy looking gun.

It is, Joz. Just keep it outta the weeds.:)
 

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