What's new
US Message Board 🦅 Political Discussion Forum

Register a free account today to become a member! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!

Femto camera experiment says space is the medium for light

Grumblenuts

Gold Member
Joined
Oct 16, 2017
Messages
11,117
Reaction score
3,378
Points
210
I thought individual atoms were making up a molecule? I figured that wasn't the true color scheme. My point about the center being orange and hot is it isn't radiating along space the same as the other colors.
Just stumbled upon this very nice "faculty" link:
Beautifully presented, but not quite everything I learned studying organic chemistry for two years. That's sure the gist of it though. It's even got a more American football shaped fullerene!

The two "covalent" bond types being studied in the image:
benzene_04.gif
 

Grumblenuts

Gold Member
Joined
Oct 16, 2017
Messages
11,117
Reaction score
3,378
Points
210
Whether you need a black hole to drive a galaxy or are looking for a bit of counterspace to keep those pesky protons in their place, your local Aether distributor is standing by, just itching to help. Call 1-800-Zee-Ethr.. Do it today!
Damn, that was some funny shit.. and still no laughs :confused:
 

Grumblenuts

Gold Member
Joined
Oct 16, 2017
Messages
11,117
Reaction score
3,378
Points
210
I guess it needs not a big of power of imagination to understand that light is able to be where space is and light is not able to be where no space is. But it is impossible to imagine "no space". Try it. Imagine something what has no curves and/or edges.

Here's the simulation:


:end of simulation.
"no space" is best simply thought of as any transition between space to counterspace or "dielectric plane." Being two dimensional, the dielectric plane can occupy neither space nor counterspace.
 

zaangalewa

Gold Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2015
Messages
16,149
Reaction score
1,493
Points
140
"no space" is best simply thought of as any transition between space to counterspace or "dielectric plane." Being two dimensional, the dielectric plane can occupy neither space nor counterspace. ...

Also a two-dimensional space is a space in physics - as well as a space with an infinite number of dimensions (= Hilbert-space). "No space" means something what is not even a dot.

And you can make "everything" with mathematics. With physics has a "simulation" not really automatically something to do.

 
Last edited:

Grumblenuts

Gold Member
Joined
Oct 16, 2017
Messages
11,117
Reaction score
3,378
Points
210
two-dimensional space is a space in physics
I could not care less what you think "a space" is "in physics." As I've stated many times previously, space actually has but one dimension, space. When I say a plane has only two dimensions I really mean it has only two coordinates. So I'll sometimes revert to the more common usage of "dimension," leaving it to the reader to sort out.. Big deal. Point being, all can easily relate to a bread basket having length, width, and height. If one of those (whatever you want to call them) is zero, it takes up no space. Keep It Simple Stupid.
 

zaangalewa

Gold Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2015
Messages
16,149
Reaction score
1,493
Points
140
OP
trevorjohnson83

trevorjohnson83

VIP Member
Joined
Nov 24, 2015
Messages
396
Reaction score
59
Points
88
Carbon's ability to form up to four covalent bonds means chains and rings of carbon can form. This means many different molecular structures can be built from this versatile atom. Carbon can easily bond to lots of other elements, including hydrogen, oxygen and the halogens.
 
OP
trevorjohnson83

trevorjohnson83

VIP Member
Joined
Nov 24, 2015
Messages
396
Reaction score
59
Points
88
Do you think carbon could have anything to with lightning? If we could get at the oxidizing of carbon in fire and directly convert that energy that is stored, I imagine in the future a device that quickly rusts a piece of steel and the energy is used to power something.
 

Grumblenuts

Gold Member
Joined
Oct 16, 2017
Messages
11,117
Reaction score
3,378
Points
210
Do you think carbon could have anything to with lightning?
Not particularly.
If we could get at the oxidizing of carbon in fire and directly convert that energy that is stored, I imagine in the future a device that quickly rusts a piece of steel and the energy is used to power something.
No carbon needed for iron to rust, but the process is highly exothermic. So you could gain significant heat ("directly") by spritzing water on a pile of clean iron, then worry about what the heck to do with the rusty product later.
 
OP
trevorjohnson83

trevorjohnson83

VIP Member
Joined
Nov 24, 2015
Messages
396
Reaction score
59
Points
88
Not particularly.

No carbon needed for iron to rust, but the process is highly exothermic. So you could gain significant heat ("directly") by spritzing water on a pile of clean iron, then worry about what the heck to do with the rusty product later.
hmm maybe drop thin pieces of steel into water with some sort of catalyst for the oxidation, an acid maybe? then heat up the water and use thin strips of steel as fuel.
 

Grumblenuts

Gold Member
Joined
Oct 16, 2017
Messages
11,117
Reaction score
3,378
Points
210
hmm maybe drop thin pieces of steel into water with some sort of catalyst for the oxidation, an acid maybe? then heat up the water and use thin strips of steel as fuel.
I don't follow. Most acids likely would catalyze the rusting process but why "heat up the water" when the reaction does that already? And "fuel" for what? Adding a salt and supplying some electrical current would catalyze the process (along with others) as well, but you'll just end up with rusty sludge plus some heat and noxious (possibly explosive) fumes.
 
OP
trevorjohnson83

trevorjohnson83

VIP Member
Joined
Nov 24, 2015
Messages
396
Reaction score
59
Points
88
I don't follow. Most acids likely would catalyze the rusting process but why "heat up the water" when the reaction does that already? And "fuel" for what? Adding a salt and supplying some electrical current would catalyze the process (along with others) as well, but you'll just end up with rusty sludge plus some heat and noxious (possibly explosive) fumes.
Grumblenuts, can you imagine any ways that we could get the electron electricity away from a molecule or atom? maybe physically shaking atom's, maybe a cold wind through hot atoms like in thunderstorms, light is important to electrolysis of water maybe its important to lightning as well.
For the individual atom or molecule, getting the electricity out of the shell would be hard unless heat is applied, the excess heat in hot water might come out as electricity. Maybe taking the atmospheric pressure off of hot water then the water molecules will be easier to get electricity out of because the shell will be less constrained. I keep imagining poking the electron shell with a cold pin and the electricity pouring out. But then I'd have to poke each atom individually, unless the transfer of heat occurs quickly into a copper conduction somehow.
 

Nobody911

Active Member
Joined
Nov 26, 2022
Messages
117
Reaction score
52
Points
43
My views :
According to Michelson-Morley experiment , nothing acts as a medium for transmission of electromagnetic waves.

Source:
1. ether | theoretical substance | Britannica – archive.md
2. Michelson-Morley experiment | Description, Results, & Facts | Britannica – archive.md
 

Grumblenuts

Gold Member
Joined
Oct 16, 2017
Messages
11,117
Reaction score
3,378
Points
210
My views :
According to Michelson-Morley experiment , nothing acts as a medium for transmission of electromagnetic waves.

Source:
1. ether | theoretical substance | Britannica – archive.md
2. Michelson-Morley experiment | Description, Results, & Facts | Britannica – archive.md
From first "Source:"
the Michelson-Morley experiment, which was designed specifically to detect the motion of Earth through the ether and which showed that there was no such effect.
Not true. Yes, they repeatedly tried to detect the Aether and failed to do so compellingly (not utterly). The British have remained particularly stodgy in this regard. Others have claimed success, but it remains unproven either way because no one really knows (yet?) how to definitively detect it using such methods. From your second (Britannica) source:
Michelson reasoned that, if the speed of light were constant with respect to the proposed ether through which Earth was moving, that motion could be detected by comparing the speed of light in the direction of Earth’s motion and the speed of light at right angles to Earth’s motion. No difference was found.
The reasonable conclusion being that Michaelson's presumptions regarding the Aether were likely wrong. Good to know, process of elimination and all that, presuming he did it well. But the only thing ultimately proven was that his method of detecting it didn't work.

That said, there are sound reasons to simply presume the Aether exists regardless. Far sounder than presuming it doesn't. Even Einstein flipped back and forth on the matter while oddly insisting that it had to be one or the other, nothing between or beyond.
 
Last edited:

Grumblenuts

Gold Member
Joined
Oct 16, 2017
Messages
11,117
Reaction score
3,378
Points
210
Grumblenuts, can you imagine any ways that we could get the electron electricity away from a molecule or atom? maybe physically shaking atom's, maybe a cold wind through hot atoms like in thunderstorms, light is important to electrolysis of water maybe its important to lightning as well.
For the individual atom or molecule, getting the electricity out of the shell would be hard unless heat is applied, the excess heat in hot water might come out as electricity. Maybe taking the atmospheric pressure off of hot water then the water molecules will be easier to get electricity out of because the shell will be less constrained. I keep imagining poking the electron shell with a cold pin and the electricity pouring out. But then I'd have to poke each atom individually, unless the transfer of heat occurs quickly into a copper conduction somehow.
Sorry, does not compute. Keep in mind that saying "the electron" is just silliness to me. An electron field, cloud, valence shell perhaps.. okay. There's no room for any electron "particles" or "waves" in my world. To me it mostly suggests a bit of counterspace (energy, the diamagnetic) reaching out and striking or tugging upon something spatial (i.e., material, matter, the magnetic).

See the aromatic ring orbital images at the top of this page. Those are the electron fields or (probability) clouds (of influence) emanating, not from the nucleus itself, but from counterspace or the exact center of the atom. Sticks of spaghetti constantly emerging from the center then terminating (breaking off) at every spot in each cloud.

Why is a "c" used in "space," but a "t" for "spatial"? Go figure.
 
Last edited:

ReinyDays

Gold Member
Joined
Oct 5, 2019
Messages
9,592
Reaction score
4,730
Points
210
Location
State of Jefferson
Sorry, does not compute. Keep in mind that saying "the electron" is just silliness to me. An electron field, cloud, valence shell perhaps.. okay. There's no room for any electron "particles" or "waves" in my world. To me it mostly suggests a bit of counterspace (energy, the diamagnetic) reaching out and striking or tugging upon something spatial (i.e., material, matter, the magnetic).

See the aromatic ring orbital images at the top of this page. Those are the electron fields or (probability) clouds (of influence) emanating, not from the nucleus itself, but from counterspace or the exact center of the atom. Sticks of spaghetti constantly emerging from the center then terminating (breaking off) at every spot in each cloud.

Why is a "c" used in "space," but a "t" for "spatial"? Go figure.

Electricity is a force ... and neither matter nor energy ... it's ... different ...

No, it's not well defined ... research continues ...
 

BothWings

Diamond Member
Joined
Aug 18, 2020
Messages
2,319
Reaction score
2,351
Points
1,928
Wow what a surprise light is a wave and space is it's medium, never saw that commin'. It's not as obvious as the earth isn't flat, but it's pretty layman to observe in the video that it is a wave.
Careful... This might be a prelude to a spiel about the science global warming once they determine the intelligence of their audience.
 

Grumblenuts

Gold Member
Joined
Oct 16, 2017
Messages
11,117
Reaction score
3,378
Points
210
Electricity is a force ... and neither matter nor energy ... it's ... different ...

No, it's not well defined ... research continues ...
Indeed. More particularly, we experience electricity as various force fields, often ones in motion. But the science remains largely a mess now thanks to Einstein (not Michelson-Morley) publicly declaring the Aether superfluous and never publicly taking it back despite all his privately expressed deep doubts and flip-flopping.

Something we can accomplish though is deducing what electricity is definitely not. Some process of elimination. Example:
Electricity is definitely not a series of electrons flowing through a wire.
 

💲 Amazon Deals 💲

Forum List

Top