Do active duty and those in the reserve make the same

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archangel

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but those in the national guards vs the marines on active duty???

my sis said no

she said those in the reserve make less


National Guard units are State Militias Their Commander in Chief is the State Governor so while under the Governor they could possibly make less...however when activated into Federal Service they are Federal troops and make the same!
 

CSM

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but those in the national guards vs the marines on active duty???

my sis said no

she said those in the reserve make less
It is a matter of public record. However, what your sister is probably refering to is that when reserves drill one weekend a month, they DO NOT get a full months pay..they get 4 days pay. They also do not get seperate rations or housing allowance. Once activated for duty however, they do get seperate rations and housing allowance (if authorized) just the same as any active duty military. They also get any of the other special pay if they are qualified and authorized.

http://www.dod.mil/dfas/militarypay/newinformation/WebPayTableVersion2006updated.pdf
 

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National Guard units are State Militias Their Commander in Chief is the State Governor so while under the Governor they could possibly make less...however when activated into Federal Service they are Federal troops and make the same!
Actually, by law, the National guard pay scale is the same; however, the drill pay is based on basic pay ONLY...the state can add their own special pay if they so desire. I have not heard of any state doing that.
 

CSM

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State vs. federal
National Guard, Nov 2001 by Cathcart, Sue

Different call-up authorities mean different pay, benefits and legalities for mobilized Guardsmen

For the thousands of National Guardsmen called to active duty under the presidential mobilization. figuring out pay, allowances and benefits is pretty straight forward.

They are essentially now in the Army and Air Force. They fall under Title 10 of the U.S. Code and will receive the same pay and benefits as other federal soldiers and airmen.

They can also be deployed worldwide and are subject to the Uniformed Code Military Justice, or UCMJ.

But what about those are called up in support of state missions?

Across the nation, governors have called out several thousand Guardsmen to to help with security at airports and other strategic facilities.

Most of these soldiers and airmen were mobilized under Title 32 of the U.S. Code, which is federally funded active duty under the control of the governor

This means they get pay and allowances identical to active-duty members and most of the same benefits.

These include special and incentive pay, a housing allowance and subsistence monies. Families are eligible to participate in the Tricare military health plan if members are on duty longer than 30 days. They also have unlimited commissary use.

However, unlike Title 10 call-ups, mobilizations under Title 32 do not count toward veteran status, which conveys added benefits such as home loans and future job preference.

That's because those called under Title 32 are not subject to worldwide deployment. In addition, their conduct is governed by state military code and not the UCMJ. They are also not subject to the posse comitatus doctrine, which prohibits federal troops from enforcing civil laws.

The unique flexibility of Title 32, which only applies to the National Guard, enabled federal authorities, working with the governors, to quickly bolster airport security.

Since Sept. 11, hundreds of Guardsmen, mostly in New York, have been mobilized for "state" active duty. Here, pay and benefits vary from state to state.

New York, for example, offers pay and allowances commensurate with federal active-duty pay guidelines but no less than $100 dollars a day.

'A few years back the state recognized it was a financial hardship to call junior enlisted Guardsmen to active duty for an extended period," explained Lt. Col. Paul Fanning, a New York National Guard spokesman. "So the governor and the legislature voted to set $100 as the minimum a soldier or airman will earn for a day of state active duty."

New York Guardsmen also receive per them and subsistence if billeting and meals are not available, Fanning said. The state also picks up the cost of medical care for members while on state active duty, but doesn't provide benefits for family members.

Across the county, those on state active duty are subject only to their state's military code and may not be deployed worldwide. However, many inter-state agreements are in place that allow Guardsmen to serve in other state in times of extreme need

More mobilization information may be obtained on the Web at www.defenselink.mil/ra. Click on "Family Readiness." From there you can look at or download the Guide to Reserve Family Members Benefits Handbook and the Guard and Reserve Family Toolkit.



Your sister may have been talking about "state active duty" which is indeed different and can vary from state to state.
 

dmp

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Often, National Guard and Reserves make MORE...There are instances of Businesses (rightly so, IMO) Paying an employees FULL Salary while the person is deployed getting full active-duty pay.
 
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archangel

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Actually, by law, the National guard pay scale is the same; however, the drill pay is based on basic pay ONLY...the state can add their own special pay if they so desire. I have not heard of any state doing that.


CSM...it can vary from state to state...until and unless the State National Guard is called up to Federal Service the State can Dictate pay scales..as a matter of fact there are two different distinctions in State"National Guard"
The first being 'Direct' the second being "Commissioned" as you find alot of across the country such as 'Civil War enactment Companies'...some are "Commissioned State Militia units...non paid and supply their own equipment...none the less are subject to call up by the Governor then they become paid and are then subject to call-up by Ferderal Law!
 

pegwinn

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Can't speak for the NG but the reserves are paid at 2 for 1 Base Pay for drill and Annual Training. When called up they get full pay and allowances. I did the Inspector-Instructor thing twice. In fact the commissary and exchange priveleges were fully extended a few years back, so if they have access to a military base, they benefit full time as well.
 

dmp

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so the answer is - NG and RC get paid at the SAME rate as AD - but w/o all the benefits, until they're called to AD.
 

Kagom

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Completely off-topic: but how the fuck did Archangel get to -1400 Rep points?
 

José

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I don't know why... but I have to agree with dmp:

I cannot understand the meaning of 99% of his posts either : )

But this in itself does not explain his reputation (or lack of).
 

José

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His last two posts sound surprisingly intelligible though...
 

CSM

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CSM...it can vary from state to state...until and unless the State National Guard is called up to Federal Service the State can Dictate pay scales..as a matter of fact there are two different distinctions in State"National Guard"
The first being 'Direct' the second being "Commissioned" as you find alot of across the country such as 'Civil War enactment Companies'...some are "Commissioned State Militia units...non paid and supply their own equipment...none the less are subject to call up by the Governor then they become paid and are then subject to call-up by Ferderal Law!
Not picking a fight with you, but you need to go read my subsequent posts about Title 10 and Title 32 vs. state activation. As for commissioned state militias, I have no idea what the rules are but I find it hard to envision when the federal activation of a company of infantry armed with muskets and napoleonic cannon would be appropriate in other than a ceremonial role!
 

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but those in the national guards vs the marines on active duty???

my sis said no

she said those in the reserve make less
I'm sure this has been answered. But when units goes into a active duty status then all the normal Active duty pay and benifits kick in. Things like COLA or housing may differ depending on units location. Once that unit goes off ad then it receives reserve drill pay and benifits. Hope that helped
 

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