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Democrat KKK had 4 million members

couch protester

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Klan violence worked to suppress black voting, and campaign seasons were deadly. More than 2,000 persons were killed, wounded and otherwise injured in Louisiana within a few weeks prior to the Presidential election of November 1868. Although St. Landry Parish had a registered Republican majority of 1,071, after the murders, no Republicans voted in the fall elections. White Democrats cast the full vote of the parish for President Grant's opponent. The KKK killed and wounded more than 200 black Republicans, hunting and chasing them through the woods. Thirteen captives were taken from jail and shot; a half-buried pile of 25 bodies was found in the woods. The KKK made people vote Democratic and gave them certificates of the fact.

The White League and Red Shirts were distinguished by their willingness to cultivate publicity, working directly to overturn Republican officeholders and regain control of politics.

It expanded membership dramatically to a 1924 peak of 1.5 million to 4 million, which was between 4-15% of the eligible population. By the 1920s, most of its members lived in the Midwest and West. Nearly one in five of the eligible Indiana population were members. It had a national base by 1925. In the South, where the great majority of whites were Democrats, the Klansmen were Democrats.

The first Klan was founded in Pulaski, Tennessee, some time between December 1865 and August 1866. As a secret vigilante group, the Klan targeted freedmen and their allies; it sought to restore white supremacy by threats and violence, including murder, against black and white Republicans.

In an 1868 newspaper interview, Forrest stated that the Klan's primary opposition was to the Loyal Leagues, Republican state governments, people such as Tennessee governor William Gannaway Brownlow and other "carpetbaggers" and "scalawags". He argued that many southerners believed that blacks were voting for the Republican Party because they were being hoodwinked by the Loyal Leagues.

Historian Eric Foner observed:

In effect, the Klan was a military force serving the interests of the Democratic party, the planter class, and all those who desired restoration of white supremacy. Its purposes were political, but political in the broadest sense, for it sought to affect power relations, both public and private, throughout Southern society. It aimed to reverse the interlocking changes sweeping over the South during Reconstruction: to destroy the Republican party's infrastructure, undermine the Reconstruction state, reestablish control of the black labor force, and restore racial subordination in every aspect of Southern life.

To that end they worked to curb the education, economic advancement, voting rights, and right to keep and bear arms of blacks.The Klan soon spread into nearly every southern state, launching a "reign of terror against Republican leaders both black and white.

The Klan attacked black members of the Loyal Leagues and intimidated southern Republicans and Freedmen's Bureau workers.

More than 40 different Klan groups exist, many having multiple chapters, or β€œklaverns,” including a few that boast a presence in a large number of states. There are over a hundred different Klan chapters around the country, with a combined strength of members and associates that may total around 5,000.

Levin says the Klan has a membership of about 5,000. The Southern Poverty Law Center gives a lower estimate of around 3,000. www.cnn.com/2015/01/07/us/klan-numbers/

So much for Trump voters being the Klan since they only number in a few thousand which debunks the logical fallacy of the Republican party being made up of the KKK. Here are black Republican today:

Ben Carson





  1. 1

    50 Centage 40

    ;
  2. 2

    Colin Powellage 78

    ;
  3. 3

    LL Cool Jage 47

    ;
  4. 4

    Condoleezza Riceage 61

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  5. 5

    Herman Cainage 70

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  6. 6

    Don Kingage 84

    ;
  7. 7

    Alan Keyesage 65

    ;
  8. 8

    Larry Elderage 63

    ;
  9. 9

    J.C. Watts58

    ;
  10. 10

    Lynn Swannage 63

    ;
  11. 11

    Sheryl Underwoodage 52

    ;
  12. 12

    Karl Maloneage 52

    ;
  13. 13

    T. D. Jakesage 58

    ;
  14. 14

    Zora Neale HurstonDied at 69 (1891-1960)

    ;
  15. 15

    Clarence Thomasage 67

    ;
  16. 16

    Wilt ChamberlainDied at 63 (1936-1999)

    ;
  17. 17

    Armstrong Williamsage 56

    ;
  18. 18

    Michael PowellDied at 85 (1905-1990)

    ;
  19. 19

    Janice Rogers Brownage 66

    ;
  20. 20

    Jimmie Walker68

    ;
  21. 21

    Tony Dungyage 60

    ;
  22. 22

    Michael Steeleage 60

    ;
  23. 23

    Cowboy Troyage 45

    ;
  24. 24

    Thomas Sowellage 85

    ;
  25. 25

    Star Parker59

    ;
  26. 26

    Ward Connerly76

    ;
  27. 27

    Walter E. Williamsage 79

    ;
  28. 28

    Edward Brookeage 96

    ;
  29. 29

    James Meredith82

    ;
  30. 30

    Ken Hamblin75

    ;
  31. 31

    Erika Haroldage 35

    ;
  32. 32

    Deroy Murdock52

    ;
  33. 33

    Roy Innisage 81

    ;
  34. 34

    Niger Innis47

    ;
  35. 35

    Shelby Steeleage 69

    ;
  36. 36

    Alveda Kingage 64

    ;
  37. 37

    John McWhorterage 50

    ;
  38. 38

    Amy Holmesage 42

    ;
  39. 39

    Angela McGlowanage 45

    ;
  40. 40

    Ken Blackwellage 67

    ;
  41. 41

    Michael KingDied at 59 (1945-2004)

    ;
  42. 42

    Stephen L. Carterage 61

    ;
  43. 43

    Stanley Crouchage 70

    ;
  44. 44

    Joseph C. Phillips53

    ;
  45. 45

    Michelle Bernardage 52

    ;
  46. 46

    Dale Wainwright54

    ;
  47. 47

    Richard Parsons67

    ;
  48. 48

    Winsome Sears51

    ;
  49. 49

    Alphonso Jackson70

    ;
  50. 50

    Carol Miller Swainage 61
  51. 51

    Peter Boulwareage 41

    ;
  52. 52

    Oscar Stanton De PriestDied at 80 (1871-1951)

    ;
  53. 53

    Sophia A. Nelson48

    ;
  54. 54

    George SchuylerDied at 82 (1895-1977)

    ;
  55. 55

    Rod Paigeage 82

    ;


  56. Michael L. Williams62

    ;
  57. 57

    Keith Butler59

    ;
  58. 58

    Melvin H. EvansDied at 67 (1917-1984)
  59. 59

    Gary Franks62

    ;
  60. 60

    Charles Payne

    ;
  61. 61

    Vernon Robinson60

    ;
  62. 62

    La Shawn Barber

    ;
  63. 63

    Robert A. George

    ;
  64. 64

    Thomas Stith, III

    ;
  65. 65

    James T. Harris III

    ;
  66. 66

    Akindele Akinyemi41

    ;
  67. 67

    Randy Daniels65

    ;
  68. 68

    Jesse Lee Peterson66

    ;
  69. 69

    Erik Rush54

    ;
  70. 70

    Lee Walker39
  71. 71

    Samuel B. FullerDied at 83 (1905-1988)
  72. 72
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    Wayne Perrymanage 70
  73. 73

    Carol Swainhttp://www.carolmswain.net/
  74. 74

    Eric Motley

    ;
  75. 75

    Wallace Jefferson
  76. 76

    Deneen Borelli
  77. 77

    Mychal Massie
Black conservatism in the United States

2000s
2001 – President George W. Bush appoints the following:
General Colin Powell as the United States Secretary of State
Roderick R. Paige as the United States Secretary of Education
Condoleezza Rice as Advisor of the National Security Council
Alphonso Jackson as the Deputy Secretary to Housing and Urban Development
Claude Allen as the Deputy Secretary of Health and Human Services
Leo S. Mackay, Jr. as the Deputy Secretary of Veterans Affairs
Larry D. Thompson as the United States Deputy Attorney General
Michael Powell as the Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission
Stephen A. Perry as Administrator of General Services Administration
Kay Coles James as Director of United States Office of Personnel Management
Charles E. James, Sr. as Director of Federal Contract Compliance
Ruth A. Davis as Director General of the Foreign Service
Reginald J. Brown as Assistant Secretary of the Army (Manpower and Reserve Affairs)
Brigadier General Francis X. Taylor as Coordinator for Counterterrorism
Eric M. Bost as Under Secretary of Agriculture for Food, Nutrition, and Consumer Services
Brian C. Roseboro as Assistant Secretary of the Treasury for Financial Markets
Dr Eric Motley as Deputy Associate Director, Office of Presidential Personnel
Pierre-Richard Prosper as United States Ambassador-at-Large for War Crimes Issues
Andrea Barthwell as Deputy Director for Demand Reduction at the Office of National Drug Control Policy
2001 – Randy Daniels Secretary of State of New York joins the GOP.
2002 – President George W. Bush appoints the following:
Major General Claude M. Bolton, Jr. as United States Assistant Secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics, and Technology
Lynn Swann as Chairman of the President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports
Brigadier General Francis X. Taylor as Assistant Secretary of State for Diplomatic Security
Ron Christie as Special Assistant to the President
2003 – President George W. Bush appoints the following:
Clark Ervin as Inspector General of the United States Department of Homeland Security
Vernon Parker as Assistant Secretary of Agriculture for Civil Rights
Michael Steele elected as Lieutenant Governor of Maryland
Jennette Bradley elected as Lieutenant Governor of Ohio
2004 – President George W. Bush appoints the following:
Alphonso Jackson as United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development
Gerald A. Reynolds as Chairman of the United States Commission on Civil Rights
Constance Berry Newman as Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs
Brian C. Roseboro as Under Secretary of the Treasury for Domestic Finance
2005 – President George W. Bush appoints the following:
Condoleezza Rice as United States Secretary of State
Claude Allen as Director of the Domestic Policy Council
Admiral John O. Agwunobi as United States Assistant Secretary for Health
Jendayi Frazer as Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs
B. J. Penn as Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Installation and Environment)
Randy Brock elected as Vermont Auditor of Accounts
Jennette Bradley is appointed Ohio State Treasurer
2006 – President George W. Bush appoints the following:
Lurita Doan as first female Administrator of the U.S. General Services Administration
Ronald J. James as Assistant Secretary of the Army (Manpower and Reserve Affairs)
2009 – Michael Steele elected the first African American Republican National Committee chairman
2010s
2010 – Tim Scott (SC) and Lt Col. Allen West (FL) elected to US Congress
Jennifer Carroll is elected Lieutenant Governor of Florida[9]
2011 – Herman Cain sought the Republican presidential nomination in 2012
2012 – Artur Davis, a former Democratic Party member of the United States House of Representatives for Alabama's 7th congressional district from 2003–2011 joined the GOP in Virginia.
2013 – Tim Scott, United States House of Representatives for South Carolina's 1st congressional district is appointed by Governor of South Carolina Nikki Haley to become the new United States Senator.
Dwayne Sawyer is appointed as Indiana State Auditor
2014 – Mia Love (UT) and Will Hurd (TX) elected to US Congress
Boyd Rutherford is elected Lieutenant Governor of Maryland
2015 – Ben Carson sought the Republican presidential nomination in 2016
Jenean Hampton is elected Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky
Politicians[edit]

Ken Blackwell
Alabama[edit]
Juan Chastang - Mobile County Commissioner (2005–2008)
Alaska[edit]
Walt Furnace – Member of the Alaska House of Representatives (1983–1991)
Arizona[edit]
Vernon Parker – Mayor of Paradise Valley, Arizona (2008–2010) and U.S. House nominee (2012)
California[edit]
Acquanetta Warren – Mayor of Fontana, California (2010–present)
Damon Dunn – Nominee for California Secretary of State in (2010) and Dallas Cowboys football player
H. Abram Wilson – Mayor of San Ramon, California (2002–2007)
Ward Connerly - University of California Regent (1993–2005)
Frederick Madison Roberts - State Assemblyman (1919–1934)
Edward Duplex – Mayor of Wheatland, California (1888)
Colorado[edit]
Ryan Frazier – Aurora City Councilman (2003–2010) and U.S. House nominee (2010)
Ed Jones - Colorado State Senator (2001–2009)
Connecticut[edit]
Steven Mullins – Commissioner of Planning and Zoning, West Haven, Connecticut (2005–present)
Delaware[edit]
Donald Blakey – Delaware State Representative (2007–2015)
Florida[edit]
Mike Hill – Florida State Representative (2013–present)
Peter Boulware – Nominee for Florida House of Representatives (2008) and Baltimore Ravens football player [10]
Georgia[edit]
Andrew Honeycutt – Candidate for Georgia House of Representatives (2014)
Deborah Honeycutt – Nominee for Georgia's 13th congressional district (2006 & 2008)
Willie Talton – Georgia State Representative (2005–2015)
Melvin Everson – Georgia State Representative (2005–2011)
Abram Colby – Georgia State Representative (1866–1870)
Illinois[edit]
John D. Anthony – Illinois State Representative (2013–present)
Tony Childress – Livingston County Sheriff (2014–present)
Erika Harold – Miss America (2003) and U.S House candidate (2012/2014)
Archibald Carey, Jr. - Chicago City Council Alderman (1947–1955)
William L. Dawson - Chicago City Council Alderman (1933–1939)
Arthur W. Mitchell - Committeeman
Indiana[edit]
Roger Brown – Indianapolis City Councillor (1993–1997) and Indiana Pacers basketball player
Kentucky[edit]
Anna Simms Banks – Republican Delegate (1920)
Charles W. Anderson – Kentucky State Representative (1936–1948)
Louisiana[edit]
Elbert Guillory - Louisiana State Senator (2009–2015) and candidate for Lieutenant Governor of Louisiana (2015)
Maryland[edit]
Aris T. Allen - Maryland State Delegate (1967-1974 & 1991), Lieutenant Governor nominee (1978) and State Senator (1979–1982)
Boyd Rutherford - Lieutenant Governor of Maryland (2015–present)
Massachusetts[edit]
Frank Cousins - Massachusetts State Representative (1993–1996) and Essex County Sheriff (1996–present)
Julius Caesar Chappelle – Massachusetts State Senator (1883–1886)
Lewis Hayden - Massachusetts State Representative (1873–1875)
Michigan[edit]
Paul H. Scott – Michigan State Representative (2009–2011)
Bill Hardiman – Mayor of Kentwood, Michigan (1992–2002), Michigan State Senator (2003–2011) and U.S. House candidate (2010)
Keith Butler – Detroit Councilman (2002–2008) and U.S. Senate candidate (2006)
James W. Ames - Michigan State Representative (1892–1898)
Mississippi[edit]
Angela McGlowan – Miss District of Columbia USA (1994) and U.S. House candidate (2010)
Yvonne Brown – Mayor of Tchula, Mississippi (2001–2009) and U.S. House nominee (2006)
Nic Lott - Chairman for the Mississippi Young Republicans
Missouri[edit]
Neal E. Boyd – 2008 Winner of America's Got Talent and nominee/candidate for the Missouri House of Representatives (2012/2014)
Sherman Parker – Missouri State Representative (2002–2008)
Carson Ross – Missouri State Representative (1989–2002) and Mayor of Blue Springs, Missouri (2008–present)
Nebraska[edit]
Dinah Abrahamson - Nebraska State Central Committeewoman (2005–2013)
Nevada[edit]
Niger Innis – Director of Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) and U.S. House candidate (2014)
Lynette Boggs – Miss Oregon (1989), Las Vegas City Council (1999–2004), Clark County Commission (2004–2006) and U.S. House nominee (2002)
Maurice Washington – Nevada State Senator (1994–2010)
New Hampshire[edit]
Jim Lawrence – New Hampshire State Representative (2004–2010) and U.S. House candidate (2014)
New Jersey[edit]
Garry Cobb – U.S. House nominee (2014) and Dallas Cowboys football player
Bruce Harris – Mayor of Chatham Borough, New Jersey (2012–present)
Martin G. Barnes - Mayor of Paterson, New Jersey (1997–2002)
James L. Usry – Mayor of Atlantic City, New Jersey (1984–1990)
Ralph L. Bradley – Mayor of East Windsor, New Jersey (1992–1995)
Matthew G. Carter – Mayor of Montclair, New Jersey (1968–1972)
Walter G. Alexander - State Assemblyman (1920–1924) and Speaker of the Assembly (1921)
New Mexico[edit]
Jane Powdrell-Culbert – New Mexico State Representative (2002–present)
Conrad James – New Mexico State Representative (2010–2012 & 2014–present)
New York[edit]
Michel Faulkner – U.S. House nominee (2010) and New York Jets football player
James Garner – Mayor of Hempstead (1988–2005) and U.S. House nominee (2004)
Richard E. Jackson - Commissioner of Motor Vehicles (1995–2000)
Edward A. Johnson - New York State Assemblyman (1918–1920)
North Carolina[edit]
Thomas Stith – Town councilman of Durham, NC (1999–2007) and Governor of North Carolina Pat McCrory's Chief of Staff (2013–present)
Dr. Ada Fisher – NC Republican National Committeewoman (2008–present) and U.S. House nominee (2006 & 2008)
James Harris - North Carolina State Representative (1868–1870 & 1883) and North Carolina State Senator (1872–1874)
Thomas A. Sykes – North Carolina State Representative (1868–1872)
Ohio[edit]
Robert C. Henry – Mayor of Springfield, Ohio (1966–1968)
John Patterson Green – Ohio State Senator (1890–1893)
Oklahoma[edit]
T.W. Shannon – Oklahoma State Representative (2007–present) and Speaker of the Oklahoma House of Representatives (2013–2014)
A. C. Hamlin – Oklahoma State Representative (1908–1910)
Green Currin - Oklahoma Territorial Legislature (1890–1892)
Oregon[edit]
Jackie Winters – Oregon State Senator (2002–present)
Pennsylvania[edit]
Harry Lewis Jr. – Pennsylvania State Representative (2014–present)
Lynn Swann – Nominee for Pennsylvania gubernatorial election, 2006 and Pittsburgh Steelers football player[11]
Renee Amoore - Pennsylvania's Republican State Committeewoman (1992–2000)
South Carolina[edit]
Charmeka Childs – Deputy Superintendent of Education (2010–2014)
Tennessee[edit]
Charles Drew – Tennessee State Representative (1983–1988)
Jesse M. H. Graham – Tennessee State Representative (1897–1898)
Styles L. Hutchins – Tennessee State Representative (1887–1888)
William C. Hodge – Tennessee State Representative (1885–1886)
William A. Feilds – Tennessee State Representative (1885–1886)
Greene E. Evans – Tennessee State Representative (1885–1886)
Samuel A. McElwee – Tennessee State Representative (1883–1888)
David F. Rivers – Tennessee State Representative (1883–1886)
John W. Boyd – Tennessee State Representative (1881–1884)
Leon Howard – Tennessee State Representative (1883–1884)
Thomas F. Cassels – Tennessee State Representative (1881–1882)
Isaac F. Norris – Tennessee State Representative (1881–1882)
Thomas A. Sykes – Tennessee State Representative (1881–1882)
Sampson W. Keeble – Tennessee State Representative (1873–1874)
Texas[edit]
Scott Turner – Texas State Representative (2013–present) and Denver Broncos football player
James White – Texas State Representative (2011–present)
Stefani Carter – Texas State Representative (2011–2015)
Robin Armstrong – Vice Chairman of the Republican Party of Texas (2006–2010)
Michael L. Williams – Commissioner of the Texas Education Agency (2012–present), Chairman of the Texas Railroad Commission (1999–2011) and U.S. House candidate (2012)
Ron Givens - Texas State Representative (1985–1989)
Clay Smothers – Texas State Representative (1977–1981)
Alexander Asberry - Texas State Representative (1889–1891)
Houston A.P. Bassett - Texas State Representative (1887–1889)
Norris Wright Cuney - Chairman of the Texas Republican Party (1886–1896)
William Holland - Texas State Representative (1876–1879)
Walter Moses Burton - Texas State Senator (1874–1883)
Richard Allen - Texas State Representative (1870–1873)
Matthew Gaines - Texas State Senator (1869–1873)
Utah[edit]
James Evans - Utah State Senator (2002–2004) and Chairman of the Utah Republican Party (2013–present)
Virginia[edit]
E.W. Jackson – Nominee for Lieutenant Governor of Virginia (2013)
Winsome Sears – Virginia State Delegate (2002–2004) and U.S. House nominee (2004)
Paul Clinton Harris - Virginia State Delegate (1998–2002)
Noel C. Taylor – Mayor of Roanoke, Virginia (1975–1992)
Peter K. Jones - Virginia State Delegate (1869–1877)
Virgin Islands[edit]
Roy Innis – Chairman of the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), member of the National Rifle Association's governing board.[12][13]
Washington[edit]
Michael Ross - Washington State Representative (1971–1973)
Charles Stokes - Washington State Representative (1951–1959)
William Owen Bush - Washington State Representative (1889)
West Virginia[edit]
Jill Upson – West Virginia State Delegate (2014–present)
Wisconsin[edit]
William Owen Bush - Washington State Representative (1889–1895)
Wyoming[edit]
Lynn Hutchings – Wyoming State Representative (2012–2014)
Other persons[edit]
United States judges[edit]
Janice Rogers Brown – Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of California (1996–2005) & U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit (2005–present)
George C. Hanks, Jr. - Justice on the First Court of Appeals (2010-2015) & Judge of the United States District Court for the Southern District of Texas (2015-present)
Sarah J. Harper – Ohio Court of Appeals (1990–2003)[14]
Wallace Jefferson – Associate Justice of the Texas Supreme Court (2001–2004) & Chief Justice of the Texas Supreme Court (2004–present)
Kevin A. Ross – Judge of the Los Angeles County Superior Court (1996–2005) & Judge on America's Court with Judge Ross (2010–present)
Clarence Thomas – Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States (1991–present)
Lynn Toler – Arbitrator on the court series Divorce Court (2001–present)[15]
Angela Tucker – Texas District Court Judge (2012–present)
Dale Wainwright – Associate Justice of the Texas Supreme Court (2003–2012)
David W. Williams – Judge of the United States District Court for the Central District of California (1969–2000)
Robert P. Young, Jr. – Justice of the Michigan Supreme Court (1999–present) & Chief Justice of the Michigan Supreme Court (2011–present)
Ambassadors[edit]
George Washington Williams – United States Ambassador to Haiti
Edward J. Perkins – United States Ambassador to the United Nations
Eric M. Bost – United States Ambassador to South Africa
Mifflin Wistar Gibbs - American Consul to Madagascar
TV personalities, authors and journalists[edit]
Michelle Bernard - Journalist
Hallie Quinn Brown - Author
C.L. Bryant – TV Host
Nannie Helen Burroughs - Author
Larry Elder – Author of 10 Things You Can't Say in America[16]
Robert A. George – Journalist
James Golden – Producer for The Rush Limbaugh Show (under the alias "Bo Snerdley")
Amy Holmes – News Anchor and political contributor on CNN
Zora Neale Hurston – Novelist
Michael King – Emmy Award-winning television producer
Raynard Jackson – Columnist and TV political analyst
Lenny McAllister – Author of Diary of a Mad Black PYC (Proud Young Conservative) and radio talk-show host from WVON-AM Chicago [17]
Tamera Mowry-Housley – Actress best known for co-starring in the sitcom Sister, Sister[18]
Deroy Murdock – Columnist for E. W. Scripps Company
Reverend Jesse Lee Peterson – President of the Brotherhood Organization of a New Destiny[19]
Jason Riley – Journalist
Shelby Steele – Author
George Schuyler – Journalist
Tommy Sotomayor – Radio and internet talk show host, YouTube personality, men's rights activist and film producer.[20]
Armstrong Williams – Author of Beyond Blame and TV host of On Point[21]
Military[edit]
Lieutenant General Russel L. HonorΓ©[22]
Lieutenant Colonel Frances Rice – Chairwoman of the National Black Republican Association
Major General Mary J. Kight – Adjutant General of California (2010–2011).[23][24][25]
Columnists[edit]
Stephen L. Carter – Christianity Today columnist, author of The Culture of Disbelief
Robert A. George – Columnist for the New York Post
Ken Hamblin – Denver Post columnist
Deroy Murdock – National Review columnist
Sophia A. Nelson – Chair ofPoliticalIntersection.comandpoliticalintersection.blogspot.com
Star Parker – President of the Coalition on Urban Renewal and Education, columnist & author
Thomas Sowell – Hoover Institute fellow and Author of Basic Economics
Ida B. Wells – Columnist
Walter E. Williams – Author of More Liberty Means Less Government
Athletes and entertainers[edit]
Ernie Banks – Chicago Cubs baseball player.[26]
James Brown – Musician. Openly endorsed Richard Nixon in the 1972 presidential election and named Strom Thurmond as one of his heroes during a 1999 interview with Rolling Stone.[27][28]
Nolan Carroll – Miami Dolphins football player and son of Jennifer Carroll, Lieutenant Governor of Florida
Wilt Chamberlain – Los Angeles Lakers basketball player
Ray Charles – Musician
50 Cent – Rapper. Supported George W. Bush in 2005,[29] but switched to the Democratic Party in support of Hillary Clinton in 2008[30]
Stacey Dash – Actress
Robert Griffin III – Washington Redskins football player
Dwayne Johnson ("The Rock") – Actor and WWE wrestler.
Mike Jones (wrestler) - Former WWF wrestler best known by the ring name Virgil.
Ronnie Lott – San Francisco 49ers football player
Don King – Boxing Promoter
Karl Malone – Olympic Gold medallist and basketball player[31]
Shaquille O'Neal – Olympic Gold medallist and basketball player
Joseph C. Phillips – Actor[32]
Jackie Robinson – Brooklyn Dodgers baseball player
Thurman Thomas – Buffalo Bills football player[33]
Cowboy Troy – Country Rapper[34]
David Tyree – New York Giants football player
Sheryl Underwood – Comedienne
Herschel Walker – Dallas Cowboys football player
Jimmie Walker – Actor
Kenny Washington – First black player to join the National Football League after it lifted its thirteen-year ban on black players in 1946
Bryan Clay - Decathlete
Education and Business[edit]
Michelle Bernard – President and CEO of the Independent Women's Forum
Herman Cain – former CEO of Godfather's Pizza, talk show host and one-time presidential candidate
George Washington Carver - Inventor
Ward Connerly – University of California Regent
Arthur Fletcher – Academic
Samuel B. Fuller – Businessman
James T. Harris III – 9th President of Widener University
George B. Jackson - Businessman
Dr. Mildred Fay Jefferson – First African American to graduate from Harvard Medical School
Alveda King – niece of Dr. Martin Luther King and senior fellow at the Alexis de Tocqueville Institution
Martin Luther King, Sr. – Father of Martin Luther King, Jr.
Stephen N. Lackey – Businessman
Vernon Robinson – Academic
Marvin Scott – Academic
Joshua I. Smith – Businessman
Thomas Sowell – Academic
Booker T. Washington – Academic
Vern Williams – Member of the National Mathematics Advisory Panel
Walter E. Williams – Academic
Civil Rights, Abolitionist and Activists[edit]
Octavius Catto – civil rights activist
Eldridge Cleaver – Leader of the Black Panther Party
James L. Farmer, Jr. – Civil rights leader
Ted Hayes – Activist for the Homeless
Dr. T. R. M. Howard – Civil Rights Campaigner
James Weldon Johnson – Activist
Scipio Africanus Jones - Activist
Charles Henry Langston - Abolitionist
James Meredith – Civil Rights Campaigner
Jesse Lee Peterson – Activist
Organizations[edit]
Abe Lincoln Black Republican Caucus
Insight America
Republicans for Black Empowerment
Congress of Racial Equality
American Civil Rights Institute
Project 21
Coalition on Urban Renewal and Education
National Black Republican Association
 

Flopper

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Klan violence worked to suppress black voting, and campaign seasons were deadly. More than 2,000 persons were killed, wounded and otherwise injured in Louisiana within a few weeks prior to the Presidential election of November 1868. Although St. Landry Parish had a registered Republican majority of 1,071, after the murders, no Republicans voted in the fall elections. White Democrats cast the full vote of the parish for President Grant's opponent. The KKK killed and wounded more than 200 black Republicans, hunting and chasing them through the woods. Thirteen captives were taken from jail and shot; a half-buried pile of 25 bodies was found in the woods. The KKK made people vote Democratic and gave them certificates of the fact.

The White League and Red Shirts were distinguished by their willingness to cultivate publicity, working directly to overturn Republican officeholders and regain control of politics.

It expanded membership dramatically to a 1924 peak of 1.5 million to 4 million, which was between 4-15% of the eligible population. By the 1920s, most of its members lived in the Midwest and West. Nearly one in five of the eligible Indiana population were members. It had a national base by 1925. In the South, where the great majority of whites were Democrats, the Klansmen were Democrats.

The first Klan was founded in Pulaski, Tennessee, some time between December 1865 and August 1866. As a secret vigilante group, the Klan targeted freedmen and their allies; it sought to restore white supremacy by threats and violence, including murder, against black and white Republicans.

In an 1868 newspaper interview, Forrest stated that the Klan's primary opposition was to the Loyal Leagues, Republican state governments, people such as Tennessee governor William Gannaway Brownlow and other "carpetbaggers" and "scalawags". He argued that many southerners believed that blacks were voting for the Republican Party because they were being hoodwinked by the Loyal Leagues.

Historian Eric Foner observed:

In effect, the Klan was a military force serving the interests of the Democratic party, the planter class, and all those who desired restoration of white supremacy. Its purposes were political, but political in the broadest sense, for it sought to affect power relations, both public and private, throughout Southern society. It aimed to reverse the interlocking changes sweeping over the South during Reconstruction: to destroy the Republican party's infrastructure, undermine the Reconstruction state, reestablish control of the black labor force, and restore racial subordination in every aspect of Southern life.

To that end they worked to curb the education, economic advancement, voting rights, and right to keep and bear arms of blacks.The Klan soon spread into nearly every southern state, launching a "reign of terror against Republican leaders both black and white.

The Klan attacked black members of the Loyal Leagues and intimidated southern Republicans and Freedmen's Bureau workers.

More than 40 different Klan groups exist, many having multiple chapters, or β€œklaverns,” including a few that boast a presence in a large number of states. There are over a hundred different Klan chapters around the country, with a combined strength of members and associates that may total around 5,000.

Levin says the Klan has a membership of about 5,000. The Southern Poverty Law Center gives a lower estimate of around 3,000. www.cnn.com/2015/01/07/us/klan-numbers/

So much for Trump voters being the Klan since they only number in a few thousand which debunks the logical fallacy of the Republican party being made up of the KKK. Here are black Republican today:

Ben Carson





  1. 1

    50 Centage 40

    ;
  2. 2

    Colin Powellage 78

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  3. 3

    LL Cool Jage 47

    ;
  4. 4

    Condoleezza Riceage 61

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  5. 5

    Herman Cainage 70

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  6. 6

    Don Kingage 84

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  7. 7

    Alan Keyesage 65

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  8. 8

    Larry Elderage 63

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  9. 9

    J.C. Watts58

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  10. 10

    Lynn Swannage 63

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  11. 11

    Sheryl Underwoodage 52

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  12. 12

    Karl Maloneage 52

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  13. 13

    T. D. Jakesage 58

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  14. 14

    Zora Neale HurstonDied at 69 (1891-1960)

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  15. 15

    Clarence Thomasage 67

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  16. 16

    Wilt ChamberlainDied at 63 (1936-1999)

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  17. 17

    Armstrong Williamsage 56

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  18. 18

    Michael PowellDied at 85 (1905-1990)

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  19. 19

    Janice Rogers Brownage 66

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  20. 20

    Jimmie Walker68

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  21. 21

    Tony Dungyage 60

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  22. 22

    Michael Steeleage 60

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  23. 23

    Cowboy Troyage 45

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  24. 24

    Thomas Sowellage 85

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  25. 25

    Star Parker59

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  26. 26

    Ward Connerly76

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  27. 27

    Walter E. Williamsage 79

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  28. 28

    Edward Brookeage 96

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  29. 29

    James Meredith82

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  30. 30

    Ken Hamblin75

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  31. 31

    Erika Haroldage 35

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  32. 32

    Deroy Murdock52

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  33. 33

    Roy Innisage 81

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  34. 34

    Niger Innis47

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  35. 35

    Shelby Steeleage 69

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  36. 36

    Alveda Kingage 64

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  37. 37

    John McWhorterage 50

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  38. 38

    Amy Holmesage 42

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  39. 39

    Angela McGlowanage 45

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  40. 40

    Ken Blackwellage 67

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  41. 41

    Michael KingDied at 59 (1945-2004)

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  42. 42

    Stephen L. Carterage 61

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  43. 43

    Stanley Crouchage 70

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  44. 44

    Joseph C. Phillips53

    ;
  45. 45

    Michelle Bernardage 52

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  46. 46

    Dale Wainwright54

    ;
  47. 47

    Richard Parsons67

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  48. 48

    Winsome Sears51

    ;
  49. 49

    Alphonso Jackson70

    ;
  50. 50

    Carol Miller Swainage 61
  51. 51

    Peter Boulwareage 41

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  52. 52

    Oscar Stanton De PriestDied at 80 (1871-1951)

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  53. 53

    Sophia A. Nelson48

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  54. 54

    George SchuylerDied at 82 (1895-1977)

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  55. 55

    Rod Paigeage 82

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  56. Michael L. Williams62

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  57. 57

    Keith Butler59

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  58. 58

    Melvin H. EvansDied at 67 (1917-1984)
  59. 59

    Gary Franks62

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  60. 60

    Charles Payne

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  61. 61

    Vernon Robinson60

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  62. 62

    La Shawn Barber

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  63. 63

    Robert A. George

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  64. 64

    Thomas Stith, III

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  65. 65

    James T. Harris III

    ;
  66. 66

    Akindele Akinyemi41

    ;
  67. 67

    Randy Daniels65

    ;
  68. 68

    Jesse Lee Peterson66

    ;
  69. 69

    Erik Rush54

    ;
  70. 70

    Lee Walker39
  71. 71

    Samuel B. FullerDied at 83 (1905-1988)
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    clip_image024.jpg

    Wayne Perrymanage 70
  73. 73

    Carol Swainhttp://www.carolmswain.net/
  74. 74

    Eric Motley

    ;
  75. 75

    Wallace Jefferson
  76. 76

    Deneen Borelli
  77. 77

    Mychal Massie
Black conservatism in the United States

2000s
2001 – President George W. Bush appoints the following:
General Colin Powell as the United States Secretary of State
Roderick R. Paige as the United States Secretary of Education
Condoleezza Rice as Advisor of the National Security Council
Alphonso Jackson as the Deputy Secretary to Housing and Urban Development
Claude Allen as the Deputy Secretary of Health and Human Services
Leo S. Mackay, Jr. as the Deputy Secretary of Veterans Affairs
Larry D. Thompson as the United States Deputy Attorney General
Michael Powell as the Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission
Stephen A. Perry as Administrator of General Services Administration
Kay Coles James as Director of United States Office of Personnel Management
Charles E. James, Sr. as Director of Federal Contract Compliance
Ruth A. Davis as Director General of the Foreign Service
Reginald J. Brown as Assistant Secretary of the Army (Manpower and Reserve Affairs)
Brigadier General Francis X. Taylor as Coordinator for Counterterrorism
Eric M. Bost as Under Secretary of Agriculture for Food, Nutrition, and Consumer Services
Brian C. Roseboro as Assistant Secretary of the Treasury for Financial Markets
Dr Eric Motley as Deputy Associate Director, Office of Presidential Personnel
Pierre-Richard Prosper as United States Ambassador-at-Large for War Crimes Issues
Andrea Barthwell as Deputy Director for Demand Reduction at the Office of National Drug Control Policy
2001 – Randy Daniels Secretary of State of New York joins the GOP.
2002 – President George W. Bush appoints the following:
Major General Claude M. Bolton, Jr. as United States Assistant Secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics, and Technology
Lynn Swann as Chairman of the President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports
Brigadier General Francis X. Taylor as Assistant Secretary of State for Diplomatic Security
Ron Christie as Special Assistant to the President
2003 – President George W. Bush appoints the following:
Clark Ervin as Inspector General of the United States Department of Homeland Security
Vernon Parker as Assistant Secretary of Agriculture for Civil Rights
Michael Steele elected as Lieutenant Governor of Maryland
Jennette Bradley elected as Lieutenant Governor of Ohio
2004 – President George W. Bush appoints the following:
Alphonso Jackson as United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development
Gerald A. Reynolds as Chairman of the United States Commission on Civil Rights
Constance Berry Newman as Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs
Brian C. Roseboro as Under Secretary of the Treasury for Domestic Finance
2005 – President George W. Bush appoints the following:
Condoleezza Rice as United States Secretary of State
Claude Allen as Director of the Domestic Policy Council
Admiral John O. Agwunobi as United States Assistant Secretary for Health
Jendayi Frazer as Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs
B. J. Penn as Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Installation and Environment)
Randy Brock elected as Vermont Auditor of Accounts
Jennette Bradley is appointed Ohio State Treasurer
2006 – President George W. Bush appoints the following:
Lurita Doan as first female Administrator of the U.S. General Services Administration
Ronald J. James as Assistant Secretary of the Army (Manpower and Reserve Affairs)
2009 – Michael Steele elected the first African American Republican National Committee chairman
2010s
2010 – Tim Scott (SC) and Lt Col. Allen West (FL) elected to US Congress
Jennifer Carroll is elected Lieutenant Governor of Florida[9]
2011 – Herman Cain sought the Republican presidential nomination in 2012
2012 – Artur Davis, a former Democratic Party member of the United States House of Representatives for Alabama's 7th congressional district from 2003–2011 joined the GOP in Virginia.
2013 – Tim Scott, United States House of Representatives for South Carolina's 1st congressional district is appointed by Governor of South Carolina Nikki Haley to become the new United States Senator.
Dwayne Sawyer is appointed as Indiana State Auditor
2014 – Mia Love (UT) and Will Hurd (TX) elected to US Congress
Boyd Rutherford is elected Lieutenant Governor of Maryland
2015 – Ben Carson sought the Republican presidential nomination in 2016
Jenean Hampton is elected Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky
Politicians[edit]

Ken Blackwell
Alabama[edit]
Juan Chastang - Mobile County Commissioner (2005–2008)
Alaska[edit]
Walt Furnace – Member of the Alaska House of Representatives (1983–1991)
Arizona[edit]
Vernon Parker – Mayor of Paradise Valley, Arizona (2008–2010) and U.S. House nominee (2012)
California[edit]
Acquanetta Warren – Mayor of Fontana, California (2010–present)
Damon Dunn – Nominee for California Secretary of State in (2010) and Dallas Cowboys football player
H. Abram Wilson – Mayor of San Ramon, California (2002–2007)
Ward Connerly - University of California Regent (1993–2005)
Frederick Madison Roberts - State Assemblyman (1919–1934)
Edward Duplex – Mayor of Wheatland, California (1888)
Colorado[edit]
Ryan Frazier – Aurora City Councilman (2003–2010) and U.S. House nominee (2010)
Ed Jones - Colorado State Senator (2001–2009)
Connecticut[edit]
Steven Mullins – Commissioner of Planning and Zoning, West Haven, Connecticut (2005–present)
Delaware[edit]
Donald Blakey – Delaware State Representative (2007–2015)
Florida[edit]
Mike Hill – Florida State Representative (2013–present)
Peter Boulware – Nominee for Florida House of Representatives (2008) and Baltimore Ravens football player [10]
Georgia[edit]
Andrew Honeycutt – Candidate for Georgia House of Representatives (2014)
Deborah Honeycutt – Nominee for Georgia's 13th congressional district (2006 & 2008)
Willie Talton – Georgia State Representative (2005–2015)
Melvin Everson – Georgia State Representative (2005–2011)
Abram Colby – Georgia State Representative (1866–1870)
Illinois[edit]
John D. Anthony – Illinois State Representative (2013–present)
Tony Childress – Livingston County Sheriff (2014–present)
Erika Harold – Miss America (2003) and U.S House candidate (2012/2014)
Archibald Carey, Jr. - Chicago City Council Alderman (1947–1955)
William L. Dawson - Chicago City Council Alderman (1933–1939)
Arthur W. Mitchell - Committeeman
Indiana[edit]
Roger Brown – Indianapolis City Councillor (1993–1997) and Indiana Pacers basketball player
Kentucky[edit]
Anna Simms Banks – Republican Delegate (1920)
Charles W. Anderson – Kentucky State Representative (1936–1948)
Louisiana[edit]
Elbert Guillory - Louisiana State Senator (2009–2015) and candidate for Lieutenant Governor of Louisiana (2015)
Maryland[edit]
Aris T. Allen - Maryland State Delegate (1967-1974 & 1991), Lieutenant Governor nominee (1978) and State Senator (1979–1982)
Boyd Rutherford - Lieutenant Governor of Maryland (2015–present)
Massachusetts[edit]
Frank Cousins - Massachusetts State Representative (1993–1996) and Essex County Sheriff (1996–present)
Julius Caesar Chappelle – Massachusetts State Senator (1883–1886)
Lewis Hayden - Massachusetts State Representative (1873–1875)
Michigan[edit]
Paul H. Scott – Michigan State Representative (2009–2011)
Bill Hardiman – Mayor of Kentwood, Michigan (1992–2002), Michigan State Senator (2003–2011) and U.S. House candidate (2010)
Keith Butler – Detroit Councilman (2002–2008) and U.S. Senate candidate (2006)
James W. Ames - Michigan State Representative (1892–1898)
Mississippi[edit]
Angela McGlowan – Miss District of Columbia USA (1994) and U.S. House candidate (2010)
Yvonne Brown – Mayor of Tchula, Mississippi (2001–2009) and U.S. House nominee (2006)
Nic Lott - Chairman for the Mississippi Young Republicans
Missouri[edit]
Neal E. Boyd – 2008 Winner of America's Got Talent and nominee/candidate for the Missouri House of Representatives (2012/2014)
Sherman Parker – Missouri State Representative (2002–2008)
Carson Ross – Missouri State Representative (1989–2002) and Mayor of Blue Springs, Missouri (2008–present)
Nebraska[edit]
Dinah Abrahamson - Nebraska State Central Committeewoman (2005–2013)
Nevada[edit]
Niger Innis – Director of Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) and U.S. House candidate (2014)
Lynette Boggs – Miss Oregon (1989), Las Vegas City Council (1999–2004), Clark County Commission (2004–2006) and U.S. House nominee (2002)
Maurice Washington – Nevada State Senator (1994–2010)
New Hampshire[edit]
Jim Lawrence – New Hampshire State Representative (2004–2010) and U.S. House candidate (2014)
New Jersey[edit]
Garry Cobb – U.S. House nominee (2014) and Dallas Cowboys football player
Bruce Harris – Mayor of Chatham Borough, New Jersey (2012–present)
Martin G. Barnes - Mayor of Paterson, New Jersey (1997–2002)
James L. Usry – Mayor of Atlantic City, New Jersey (1984–1990)
Ralph L. Bradley – Mayor of East Windsor, New Jersey (1992–1995)
Matthew G. Carter – Mayor of Montclair, New Jersey (1968–1972)
Walter G. Alexander - State Assemblyman (1920–1924) and Speaker of the Assembly (1921)
New Mexico[edit]
Jane Powdrell-Culbert – New Mexico State Representative (2002–present)
Conrad James – New Mexico State Representative (2010–2012 & 2014–present)
New York[edit]
Michel Faulkner – U.S. House nominee (2010) and New York Jets football player
James Garner – Mayor of Hempstead (1988–2005) and U.S. House nominee (2004)
Richard E. Jackson - Commissioner of Motor Vehicles (1995–2000)
Edward A. Johnson - New York State Assemblyman (1918–1920)
North Carolina[edit]
Thomas Stith – Town councilman of Durham, NC (1999–2007) and Governor of North Carolina Pat McCrory's Chief of Staff (2013–present)
Dr. Ada Fisher – NC Republican National Committeewoman (2008–present) and U.S. House nominee (2006 & 2008)
James Harris - North Carolina State Representative (1868–1870 & 1883) and North Carolina State Senator (1872–1874)
Thomas A. Sykes – North Carolina State Representative (1868–1872)
Ohio[edit]
Robert C. Henry – Mayor of Springfield, Ohio (1966–1968)
John Patterson Green – Ohio State Senator (1890–1893)
Oklahoma[edit]
T.W. Shannon – Oklahoma State Representative (2007–present) and Speaker of the Oklahoma House of Representatives (2013–2014)
A. C. Hamlin – Oklahoma State Representative (1908–1910)
Green Currin - Oklahoma Territorial Legislature (1890–1892)
Oregon[edit]
Jackie Winters – Oregon State Senator (2002–present)
Pennsylvania[edit]
Harry Lewis Jr. – Pennsylvania State Representative (2014–present)
Lynn Swann – Nominee for Pennsylvania gubernatorial election, 2006 and Pittsburgh Steelers football player[11]
Renee Amoore - Pennsylvania's Republican State Committeewoman (1992–2000)
South Carolina[edit]
Charmeka Childs – Deputy Superintendent of Education (2010–2014)
Tennessee[edit]
Charles Drew – Tennessee State Representative (1983–1988)
Jesse M. H. Graham – Tennessee State Representative (1897–1898)
Styles L. Hutchins – Tennessee State Representative (1887–1888)
William C. Hodge – Tennessee State Representative (1885–1886)
William A. Feilds – Tennessee State Representative (1885–1886)
Greene E. Evans – Tennessee State Representative (1885–1886)
Samuel A. McElwee – Tennessee State Representative (1883–1888)
David F. Rivers – Tennessee State Representative (1883–1886)
John W. Boyd – Tennessee State Representative (1881–1884)
Leon Howard – Tennessee State Representative (1883–1884)
Thomas F. Cassels – Tennessee State Representative (1881–1882)
Isaac F. Norris – Tennessee State Representative (1881–1882)
Thomas A. Sykes – Tennessee State Representative (1881–1882)
Sampson W. Keeble – Tennessee State Representative (1873–1874)
Texas[edit]
Scott Turner – Texas State Representative (2013–present) and Denver Broncos football player
James White – Texas State Representative (2011–present)
Stefani Carter – Texas State Representative (2011–2015)
Robin Armstrong – Vice Chairman of the Republican Party of Texas (2006–2010)
Michael L. Williams – Commissioner of the Texas Education Agency (2012–present), Chairman of the Texas Railroad Commission (1999–2011) and U.S. House candidate (2012)
Ron Givens - Texas State Representative (1985–1989)
Clay Smothers – Texas State Representative (1977–1981)
Alexander Asberry - Texas State Representative (1889–1891)
Houston A.P. Bassett - Texas State Representative (1887–1889)
Norris Wright Cuney - Chairman of the Texas Republican Party (1886–1896)
William Holland - Texas State Representative (1876–1879)
Walter Moses Burton - Texas State Senator (1874–1883)
Richard Allen - Texas State Representative (1870–1873)
Matthew Gaines - Texas State Senator (1869–1873)
Utah[edit]
James Evans - Utah State Senator (2002–2004) and Chairman of the Utah Republican Party (2013–present)
Virginia[edit]
E.W. Jackson – Nominee for Lieutenant Governor of Virginia (2013)
Winsome Sears – Virginia State Delegate (2002–2004) and U.S. House nominee (2004)
Paul Clinton Harris - Virginia State Delegate (1998–2002)
Noel C. Taylor – Mayor of Roanoke, Virginia (1975–1992)
Peter K. Jones - Virginia State Delegate (1869–1877)
Virgin Islands[edit]
Roy Innis – Chairman of the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), member of the National Rifle Association's governing board.[12][13]
Washington[edit]
Michael Ross - Washington State Representative (1971–1973)
Charles Stokes - Washington State Representative (1951–1959)
William Owen Bush - Washington State Representative (1889)
West Virginia[edit]
Jill Upson – West Virginia State Delegate (2014–present)
Wisconsin[edit]
William Owen Bush - Washington State Representative (1889–1895)
Wyoming[edit]
Lynn Hutchings – Wyoming State Representative (2012–2014)
Other persons[edit]
United States judges[edit]
Janice Rogers Brown – Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of California (1996–2005) & U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit (2005–present)
George C. Hanks, Jr. - Justice on the First Court of Appeals (2010-2015) & Judge of the United States District Court for the Southern District of Texas (2015-present)
Sarah J. Harper – Ohio Court of Appeals (1990–2003)[14]
Wallace Jefferson – Associate Justice of the Texas Supreme Court (2001–2004) & Chief Justice of the Texas Supreme Court (2004–present)
Kevin A. Ross – Judge of the Los Angeles County Superior Court (1996–2005) & Judge on America's Court with Judge Ross (2010–present)
Clarence Thomas – Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States (1991–present)
Lynn Toler – Arbitrator on the court series Divorce Court (2001–present)[15]
Angela Tucker – Texas District Court Judge (2012–present)
Dale Wainwright – Associate Justice of the Texas Supreme Court (2003–2012)
David W. Williams – Judge of the United States District Court for the Central District of California (1969–2000)
Robert P. Young, Jr. – Justice of the Michigan Supreme Court (1999–present) & Chief Justice of the Michigan Supreme Court (2011–present)
Ambassadors[edit]
George Washington Williams – United States Ambassador to Haiti
Edward J. Perkins – United States Ambassador to the United Nations
Eric M. Bost – United States Ambassador to South Africa
Mifflin Wistar Gibbs - American Consul to Madagascar
TV personalities, authors and journalists[edit]
Michelle Bernard - Journalist
Hallie Quinn Brown - Author
C.L. Bryant – TV Host
Nannie Helen Burroughs - Author
Larry Elder – Author of 10 Things You Can't Say in America[16]
Robert A. George – Journalist
James Golden – Producer for The Rush Limbaugh Show (under the alias "Bo Snerdley")
Amy Holmes – News Anchor and political contributor on CNN
Zora Neale Hurston – Novelist
Michael King – Emmy Award-winning television producer
Raynard Jackson – Columnist and TV political analyst
Lenny McAllister – Author of Diary of a Mad Black PYC (Proud Young Conservative) and radio talk-show host from WVON-AM Chicago [17]
Tamera Mowry-Housley – Actress best known for co-starring in the sitcom Sister, Sister[18]
Deroy Murdock – Columnist for E. W. Scripps Company
Reverend Jesse Lee Peterson – President of the Brotherhood Organization of a New Destiny[19]
Jason Riley – Journalist
Shelby Steele – Author
George Schuyler – Journalist
Tommy Sotomayor – Radio and internet talk show host, YouTube personality, men's rights activist and film producer.[20]
Armstrong Williams – Author of Beyond Blame and TV host of On Point[21]
Military[edit]
Lieutenant General Russel L. HonorΓ©[22]
Lieutenant Colonel Frances Rice – Chairwoman of the National Black Republican Association
Major General Mary J. Kight – Adjutant General of California (2010–2011).[23][24][25]
Columnists[edit]
Stephen L. Carter – Christianity Today columnist, author of The Culture of Disbelief
Robert A. George – Columnist for the New York Post
Ken Hamblin – Denver Post columnist
Deroy Murdock – National Review columnist
Sophia A. Nelson – Chair ofPoliticalIntersection.comandpoliticalintersection.blogspot.com
Star Parker – President of the Coalition on Urban Renewal and Education, columnist & author
Thomas Sowell – Hoover Institute fellow and Author of Basic Economics
Ida B. Wells – Columnist
Walter E. Williams – Author of More Liberty Means Less Government
Athletes and entertainers[edit]
Ernie Banks – Chicago Cubs baseball player.[26]
James Brown – Musician. Openly endorsed Richard Nixon in the 1972 presidential election and named Strom Thurmond as one of his heroes during a 1999 interview with Rolling Stone.[27][28]
Nolan Carroll – Miami Dolphins football player and son of Jennifer Carroll, Lieutenant Governor of Florida
Wilt Chamberlain – Los Angeles Lakers basketball player
Ray Charles – Musician
50 Cent – Rapper. Supported George W. Bush in 2005,[29] but switched to the Democratic Party in support of Hillary Clinton in 2008[30]
Stacey Dash – Actress
Robert Griffin III – Washington Redskins football player
Dwayne Johnson ("The Rock") – Actor and WWE wrestler.
Mike Jones (wrestler) - Former WWF wrestler best known by the ring name Virgil.
Ronnie Lott – San Francisco 49ers football player
Don King – Boxing Promoter
Karl Malone – Olympic Gold medallist and basketball player[31]
Shaquille O'Neal – Olympic Gold medallist and basketball player
Joseph C. Phillips – Actor[32]
Jackie Robinson – Brooklyn Dodgers baseball player
Thurman Thomas – Buffalo Bills football player[33]
Cowboy Troy – Country Rapper[34]
David Tyree – New York Giants football player
Sheryl Underwood – Comedienne
Herschel Walker – Dallas Cowboys football player
Jimmie Walker – Actor
Kenny Washington – First black player to join the National Football League after it lifted its thirteen-year ban on black players in 1946
Bryan Clay - Decathlete
Education and Business[edit]
Michelle Bernard – President and CEO of the Independent Women's Forum
Herman Cain – former CEO of Godfather's Pizza, talk show host and one-time presidential candidate
George Washington Carver - Inventor
Ward Connerly – University of California Regent
Arthur Fletcher – Academic
Samuel B. Fuller – Businessman
James T. Harris III – 9th President of Widener University
George B. Jackson - Businessman
Dr. Mildred Fay Jefferson – First African American to graduate from Harvard Medical School
Alveda King – niece of Dr. Martin Luther King and senior fellow at the Alexis de Tocqueville Institution
Martin Luther King, Sr. – Father of Martin Luther King, Jr.
Stephen N. Lackey – Businessman
Vernon Robinson – Academic
Marvin Scott – Academic
Joshua I. Smith – Businessman
Thomas Sowell – Academic
Booker T. Washington – Academic
Vern Williams – Member of the National Mathematics Advisory Panel
Walter E. Williams – Academic
Civil Rights, Abolitionist and Activists[edit]
Octavius Catto – civil rights activist
Eldridge Cleaver – Leader of the Black Panther Party
James L. Farmer, Jr. – Civil rights leader
Ted Hayes – Activist for the Homeless
Dr. T. R. M. Howard – Civil Rights Campaigner
James Weldon Johnson – Activist
Scipio Africanus Jones - Activist
Charles Henry Langston - Abolitionist
James Meredith – Civil Rights Campaigner
Jesse Lee Peterson – Activist
Organizations[edit]
Abe Lincoln Black Republican Caucus
Insight America
Republicans for Black Empowerment
Congress of Racial Equality
American Civil Rights Institute
Project 21
Coalition on Urban Renewal and Education
National Black Republican Association
And if you think for one minute, Klan members are going to be voting for Hilary Clinton, you're nuts. She stands for everything they hate.
 

tinydancer

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The Grand Dragon of the KKK's California branch has endorsed Hillary.
 
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The Grand Dragon of the KKK's California branch has endorsed Hillary.

Ku Klux Klan Endorses Obama
February 7th, 2008

by James R. Crowe

Anything or anyone is better than Hillary Rodham Clinton

KENTUCKY – USA – Imperial Wizard, Ronald Edwards has stated that, β€œanything is better than Hillary Clinton.”

White Christian Supremacist group the Ku Klux Klan has endorsed Barack Obama to be the next President of the United States of America.

Speaking from his Kentucky office in Dawson Springs, the Imperial Wizard exclaimed that anything or anyone is better than having that β€œcrazy ass bitch” as President.

This is the first time in Klan history that any member of the KKK has ever publicly supported an African American candidate for the presidency.

KKK lodges all over America have been gathering and holding rallies supporting the black presidential candidate.

kkk.jpg


KKK members in Tennessee rally against Hillary Clinton and support Barack Obama

Grand Turk Cletus Monroe has also been very vocal about the election and has donated thousands of dollars to Obama’s election fund.

β€œThe boy’s gonna do it. My Klan group has donated up to $250,000 to the Obama fund. Anything is better than Hillary Clinton. Hell I’ll even adopt a black kid from Africa before I vote for Hillary.”

β€œA few years back we were lynching negroes. Now we’re gonna vote for one to be president of the US of motherfu**ing A, damn it! Anyone or anything is better than Hillary Clinton – anything!!”

Placards for Barack Obama have been put up around the Klan’s Headquarters and the KKK have announced a television ad campaign to support the African American candidate
 
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Lakhota

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Democrat KKK had 4 million members

And then they switched to the Republican Party. So, what's your point?
 
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And then they switched to the Republican Party. So, what's your point?

The KKK of today doesn't like the government. Only 3000 klan members recorded presently today which doesn't make up for a threat, as when 4 million democrat KKK members took free speech and voting rights away from Republicans like they do today. You have more black republicans than KKK members today. More logical fallacy. See for yourself:

Ben Carson





  1. 1

    50 Centage 40

    ;
  2. 2

    Colin Powellage 78

    ;
  3. 3

    LL Cool Jage 47

    ;
  4. 4

    Condoleezza Riceage 61

    ;
  5. 5

    Herman Cainage 70

    ;
  6. 6

    Don Kingage 84

    ;
  7. 7

    Alan Keyesage 65

    ;
  8. 8

    Larry Elderage 63

    ;
  9. 9

    J.C. Watts58

    ;
  10. 10

    Lynn Swannage 63

    ;
  11. 11

    Sheryl Underwoodage 52

    ;
  12. 12

    Karl Maloneage 52

    ;
  13. 13

    T. D. Jakesage 58

    ;
  14. 14

    Zora Neale HurstonDied at 69 (1891-1960)

    ;
  15. 15

    Clarence Thomasage 67

    ;
  16. 16

    Wilt ChamberlainDied at 63 (1936-1999)

    ;
  17. 17

    Armstrong Williamsage 56

    ;
  18. 18

    Michael PowellDied at 85 (1905-1990)

    ;
  19. 19

    Janice Rogers Brownage 66

    ;
  20. 20

    Jimmie Walker68

    ;
  21. 21

    Tony Dungyage 60

    ;
  22. 22

    Michael Steeleage 60

    ;
  23. 23

    Cowboy Troyage 45

    ;
  24. 24

    Thomas Sowellage 85

    ;
  25. 25

    Star Parker59

    ;
  26. 26

    Ward Connerly76

    ;
  27. 27

    Walter E. Williamsage 79

    ;
  28. 28

    Edward Brookeage 96

    ;
  29. 29

    James Meredith82

    ;
  30. 30

    Ken Hamblin75

    ;
  31. 31

    Erika Haroldage 35

    ;
  32. 32

    Deroy Murdock52

    ;
  33. 33

    Roy Innisage 81

    ;
  34. 34

    Niger Innis47

    ;
  35. 35

    Shelby Steeleage 69

    ;
  36. 36

    Alveda Kingage 64

    ;
  37. 37

    John McWhorterage 50

    ;
  38. 38

    Amy Holmesage 42

    ;
  39. 39

    Angela McGlowanage 45

    ;
  40. 40

    Ken Blackwellage 67

    ;
  41. 41

    Michael KingDied at 59 (1945-2004)

    ;
  42. 42

    Stephen L. Carterage 61

    ;
  43. 43

    Stanley Crouchage 70

    ;
  44. 44

    Joseph C. Phillips53

    ;
  45. 45

    Michelle Bernardage 52

    ;
  46. 46

    Dale Wainwright54

    ;
  47. 47

    Richard Parsons67

    ;
  48. 48

    Winsome Sears51

    ;
  49. 49

    Alphonso Jackson70

    ;
  50. 50

    Carol Miller Swainage 61
  51. 51

    Peter Boulwareage 41

    ;
  52. 52

    Oscar Stanton De PriestDied at 80 (1871-1951)

    ;
  53. 53

    Sophia A. Nelson48

    ;
  54. 54

    George SchuylerDied at 82 (1895-1977)

    ;
  55. 55

    Rod Paigeage 82

    ;


  56. Michael L. Williams62

    ;
  57. 57

    Keith Butler59

    ;
  58. 58

    Melvin H. EvansDied at 67 (1917-1984)
  59. 59

    Gary Franks62

    ;
  60. 60

    Charles Payne

    ;
  61. 61

    Vernon Robinson60

    ;
  62. 62

    La Shawn Barber

    ;
  63. 63

    Robert A. George

    ;
  64. 64

    Thomas Stith, III

    ;
  65. 65

    James T. Harris III

    ;
  66. 66

    Akindele Akinyemi41

    ;
  67. 67

    Randy Daniels65

    ;
  68. 68

    Jesse Lee Peterson66

    ;
  69. 69

    Erik Rush54

    ;
  70. 70

    Lee Walker39
  71. 71

    Samuel B. FullerDied at 83 (1905-1988)
  72. 72
    clip_image024.jpg

    Wayne Perrymanage 70
  73. 73

    Carol Swainhttp://www.carolmswain.net/
  74. 74

    Eric Motley

    ;
  75. 75

    Wallace Jefferson
  76. 76

    Deneen Borelli
  77. 77

    Mychal Massie
Black conservatism in the United States

2000s
2001 – President George W. Bush appoints the following:
General Colin Powell as the United States Secretary of State
Roderick R. Paige as the United States Secretary of Education
Condoleezza Rice as Advisor of the National Security Council
Alphonso Jackson as the Deputy Secretary to Housing and Urban Development
Claude Allen as the Deputy Secretary of Health and Human Services
Leo S. Mackay, Jr. as the Deputy Secretary of Veterans Affairs
Larry D. Thompson as the United States Deputy Attorney General
Michael Powell as the Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission
Stephen A. Perry as Administrator of General Services Administration
Kay Coles James as Director of United States Office of Personnel Management
Charles E. James, Sr. as Director of Federal Contract Compliance
Ruth A. Davis as Director General of the Foreign Service
Reginald J. Brown as Assistant Secretary of the Army (Manpower and Reserve Affairs)
Brigadier General Francis X. Taylor as Coordinator for Counterterrorism
Eric M. Bost as Under Secretary of Agriculture for Food, Nutrition, and Consumer Services
Brian C. Roseboro as Assistant Secretary of the Treasury for Financial Markets
Dr Eric Motley as Deputy Associate Director, Office of Presidential Personnel
Pierre-Richard Prosper as United States Ambassador-at-Large for War Crimes Issues
Andrea Barthwell as Deputy Director for Demand Reduction at the Office of National Drug Control Policy
2001 – Randy Daniels Secretary of State of New York joins the GOP.
2002 – President George W. Bush appoints the following:
Major General Claude M. Bolton, Jr. as United States Assistant Secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics, and Technology
Lynn Swann as Chairman of the President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports
Brigadier General Francis X. Taylor as Assistant Secretary of State for Diplomatic Security
Ron Christie as Special Assistant to the President
2003 – President George W. Bush appoints the following:
Clark Ervin as Inspector General of the United States Department of Homeland Security
Vernon Parker as Assistant Secretary of Agriculture for Civil Rights
Michael Steele elected as Lieutenant Governor of Maryland
Jennette Bradley elected as Lieutenant Governor of Ohio
2004 – President George W. Bush appoints the following:
Alphonso Jackson as United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development
Gerald A. Reynolds as Chairman of the United States Commission on Civil Rights
Constance Berry Newman as Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs
Brian C. Roseboro as Under Secretary of the Treasury for Domestic Finance
2005 – President George W. Bush appoints the following:
Condoleezza Rice as United States Secretary of State
Claude Allen as Director of the Domestic Policy Council
Admiral John O. Agwunobi as United States Assistant Secretary for Health
Jendayi Frazer as Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs
B. J. Penn as Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Installation and Environment)
Randy Brock elected as Vermont Auditor of Accounts
Jennette Bradley is appointed Ohio State Treasurer
2006 – President George W. Bush appoints the following:
Lurita Doan as first female Administrator of the U.S. General Services Administration
Ronald J. James as Assistant Secretary of the Army (Manpower and Reserve Affairs)
2009 – Michael Steele elected the first African American Republican National Committee chairman
2010s
2010 – Tim Scott (SC) and Lt Col. Allen West (FL) elected to US Congress
Jennifer Carroll is elected Lieutenant Governor of Florida[9]
2011 – Herman Cain sought the Republican presidential nomination in 2012
2012 – Artur Davis, a former Democratic Party member of the United States House of Representatives for Alabama's 7th congressional district from 2003–2011 joined the GOP in Virginia.
2013 – Tim Scott, United States House of Representatives for South Carolina's 1st congressional district is appointed by Governor of South Carolina Nikki Haley to become the new United States Senator.
Dwayne Sawyer is appointed as Indiana State Auditor
2014 – Mia Love (UT) and Will Hurd (TX) elected to US Congress
Boyd Rutherford is elected Lieutenant Governor of Maryland
2015 – Ben Carson sought the Republican presidential nomination in 2016
Jenean Hampton is elected Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky
Politicians[edit]

Ken Blackwell
Alabama[edit]
Juan Chastang - Mobile County Commissioner (2005–2008)
Alaska[edit]
Walt Furnace – Member of the Alaska House of Representatives (1983–1991)
Arizona[edit]
Vernon Parker – Mayor of Paradise Valley, Arizona (2008–2010) and U.S. House nominee (2012)
California[edit]
Acquanetta Warren – Mayor of Fontana, California (2010–present)
Damon Dunn – Nominee for California Secretary of State in (2010) and Dallas Cowboys football player
H. Abram Wilson – Mayor of San Ramon, California (2002–2007)
Ward Connerly - University of California Regent (1993–2005)
Frederick Madison Roberts - State Assemblyman (1919–1934)
Edward Duplex – Mayor of Wheatland, California (1888)
Colorado[edit]
Ryan Frazier – Aurora City Councilman (2003–2010) and U.S. House nominee (2010)
Ed Jones - Colorado State Senator (2001–2009)
Connecticut[edit]
Steven Mullins – Commissioner of Planning and Zoning, West Haven, Connecticut (2005–present)
Delaware[edit]
Donald Blakey – Delaware State Representative (2007–2015)
Florida[edit]
Mike Hill – Florida State Representative (2013–present)
Peter Boulware – Nominee for Florida House of Representatives (2008) and Baltimore Ravens football player [10]
Georgia[edit]
Andrew Honeycutt – Candidate for Georgia House of Representatives (2014)
Deborah Honeycutt – Nominee for Georgia's 13th congressional district (2006 & 2008)
Willie Talton – Georgia State Representative (2005–2015)
Melvin Everson – Georgia State Representative (2005–2011)
Abram Colby – Georgia State Representative (1866–1870)
Illinois[edit]
John D. Anthony – Illinois State Representative (2013–present)
Tony Childress – Livingston County Sheriff (2014–present)
Erika Harold – Miss America (2003) and U.S House candidate (2012/2014)
Archibald Carey, Jr. - Chicago City Council Alderman (1947–1955)
William L. Dawson - Chicago City Council Alderman (1933–1939)
Arthur W. Mitchell - Committeeman
Indiana[edit]
Roger Brown – Indianapolis City Councillor (1993–1997) and Indiana Pacers basketball player
Kentucky[edit]
Anna Simms Banks – Republican Delegate (1920)
Charles W. Anderson – Kentucky State Representative (1936–1948)
Louisiana[edit]
Elbert Guillory - Louisiana State Senator (2009–2015) and candidate for Lieutenant Governor of Louisiana (2015)
Maryland[edit]
Aris T. Allen - Maryland State Delegate (1967-1974 & 1991), Lieutenant Governor nominee (1978) and State Senator (1979–1982)
Boyd Rutherford - Lieutenant Governor of Maryland (2015–present)
Massachusetts[edit]
Frank Cousins - Massachusetts State Representative (1993–1996) and Essex County Sheriff (1996–present)
Julius Caesar Chappelle – Massachusetts State Senator (1883–1886)
Lewis Hayden - Massachusetts State Representative (1873–1875)
Michigan[edit]
Paul H. Scott – Michigan State Representative (2009–2011)
Bill Hardiman – Mayor of Kentwood, Michigan (1992–2002), Michigan State Senator (2003–2011) and U.S. House candidate (2010)
Keith Butler – Detroit Councilman (2002–2008) and U.S. Senate candidate (2006)
James W. Ames - Michigan State Representative (1892–1898)
Mississippi[edit]
Angela McGlowan – Miss District of Columbia USA (1994) and U.S. House candidate (2010)
Yvonne Brown – Mayor of Tchula, Mississippi (2001–2009) and U.S. House nominee (2006)
Nic Lott - Chairman for the Mississippi Young Republicans
Missouri[edit]
Neal E. Boyd – 2008 Winner of America's Got Talent and nominee/candidate for the Missouri House of Representatives (2012/2014)
Sherman Parker – Missouri State Representative (2002–2008)
Carson Ross – Missouri State Representative (1989–2002) and Mayor of Blue Springs, Missouri (2008–present)
Nebraska[edit]
Dinah Abrahamson - Nebraska State Central Committeewoman (2005–2013)
Nevada[edit]
Niger Innis – Director of Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) and U.S. House candidate (2014)
Lynette Boggs – Miss Oregon (1989), Las Vegas City Council (1999–2004), Clark County Commission (2004–2006) and U.S. House nominee (2002)
Maurice Washington – Nevada State Senator (1994–2010)
New Hampshire[edit]
Jim Lawrence – New Hampshire State Representative (2004–2010) and U.S. House candidate (2014)
New Jersey[edit]
Garry Cobb – U.S. House nominee (2014) and Dallas Cowboys football player
Bruce Harris – Mayor of Chatham Borough, New Jersey (2012–present)
Martin G. Barnes - Mayor of Paterson, New Jersey (1997–2002)
James L. Usry – Mayor of Atlantic City, New Jersey (1984–1990)
Ralph L. Bradley – Mayor of East Windsor, New Jersey (1992–1995)
Matthew G. Carter – Mayor of Montclair, New Jersey (1968–1972)
Walter G. Alexander - State Assemblyman (1920–1924) and Speaker of the Assembly (1921)
New Mexico[edit]
Jane Powdrell-Culbert – New Mexico State Representative (2002–present)
Conrad James – New Mexico State Representative (2010–2012 & 2014–present)
New York[edit]
Michel Faulkner – U.S. House nominee (2010) and New York Jets football player
James Garner – Mayor of Hempstead (1988–2005) and U.S. House nominee (2004)
Richard E. Jackson - Commissioner of Motor Vehicles (1995–2000)
Edward A. Johnson - New York State Assemblyman (1918–1920)
North Carolina[edit]
Thomas Stith – Town councilman of Durham, NC (1999–2007) and Governor of North Carolina Pat McCrory's Chief of Staff (2013–present)
Dr. Ada Fisher – NC Republican National Committeewoman (2008–present) and U.S. House nominee (2006 & 2008)
James Harris - North Carolina State Representative (1868–1870 & 1883) and North Carolina State Senator (1872–1874)
Thomas A. Sykes – North Carolina State Representative (1868–1872)
Ohio[edit]
Robert C. Henry – Mayor of Springfield, Ohio (1966–1968)
John Patterson Green – Ohio State Senator (1890–1893)
Oklahoma[edit]
T.W. Shannon – Oklahoma State Representative (2007–present) and Speaker of the Oklahoma House of Representatives (2013–2014)
A. C. Hamlin – Oklahoma State Representative (1908–1910)
Green Currin - Oklahoma Territorial Legislature (1890–1892)
Oregon[edit]
Jackie Winters – Oregon State Senator (2002–present)
Pennsylvania[edit]
Harry Lewis Jr. – Pennsylvania State Representative (2014–present)
Lynn Swann – Nominee for Pennsylvania gubernatorial election, 2006 and Pittsburgh Steelers football player[11]
Renee Amoore - Pennsylvania's Republican State Committeewoman (1992–2000)
South Carolina[edit]
Charmeka Childs – Deputy Superintendent of Education (2010–2014)
Tennessee[edit]
Charles Drew – Tennessee State Representative (1983–1988)
Jesse M. H. Graham – Tennessee State Representative (1897–1898)
Styles L. Hutchins – Tennessee State Representative (1887–1888)
William C. Hodge – Tennessee State Representative (1885–1886)
William A. Feilds – Tennessee State Representative (1885–1886)
Greene E. Evans – Tennessee State Representative (1885–1886)
Samuel A. McElwee – Tennessee State Representative (1883–1888)
David F. Rivers – Tennessee State Representative (1883–1886)
John W. Boyd – Tennessee State Representative (1881–1884)
Leon Howard – Tennessee State Representative (1883–1884)
Thomas F. Cassels – Tennessee State Representative (1881–1882)
Isaac F. Norris – Tennessee State Representative (1881–1882)
Thomas A. Sykes – Tennessee State Representative (1881–1882)
Sampson W. Keeble – Tennessee State Representative (1873–1874)
Texas[edit]
Scott Turner – Texas State Representative (2013–present) and Denver Broncos football player
James White – Texas State Representative (2011–present)
Stefani Carter – Texas State Representative (2011–2015)
Robin Armstrong – Vice Chairman of the Republican Party of Texas (2006–2010)
Michael L. Williams – Commissioner of the Texas Education Agency (2012–present), Chairman of the Texas Railroad Commission (1999–2011) and U.S. House candidate (2012)
Ron Givens - Texas State Representative (1985–1989)
Clay Smothers – Texas State Representative (1977–1981)
Alexander Asberry - Texas State Representative (1889–1891)
Houston A.P. Bassett - Texas State Representative (1887–1889)
Norris Wright Cuney - Chairman of the Texas Republican Party (1886–1896)
William Holland - Texas State Representative (1876–1879)
Walter Moses Burton - Texas State Senator (1874–1883)
Richard Allen - Texas State Representative (1870–1873)
Matthew Gaines - Texas State Senator (1869–1873)
Utah[edit]
James Evans - Utah State Senator (2002–2004) and Chairman of the Utah Republican Party (2013–present)
Virginia[edit]
E.W. Jackson – Nominee for Lieutenant Governor of Virginia (2013)
Winsome Sears – Virginia State Delegate (2002–2004) and U.S. House nominee (2004)
Paul Clinton Harris - Virginia State Delegate (1998–2002)
Noel C. Taylor – Mayor of Roanoke, Virginia (1975–1992)
Peter K. Jones - Virginia State Delegate (1869–1877)
Virgin Islands[edit]
Roy Innis – Chairman of the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), member of the National Rifle Association's governing board.[12][13]
Washington[edit]
Michael Ross - Washington State Representative (1971–1973)
Charles Stokes - Washington State Representative (1951–1959)
William Owen Bush - Washington State Representative (1889)
West Virginia[edit]
Jill Upson – West Virginia State Delegate (2014–present)
Wisconsin[edit]
William Owen Bush - Washington State Representative (1889–1895)
Wyoming[edit]
Lynn Hutchings – Wyoming State Representative (2012–2014)
Other persons[edit]
United States judges[edit]
Janice Rogers Brown – Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of California (1996–2005) & U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit (2005–present)
George C. Hanks, Jr. - Justice on the First Court of Appeals (2010-2015) & Judge of the United States District Court for the Southern District of Texas (2015-present)
Sarah J. Harper – Ohio Court of Appeals (1990–2003)[14]
Wallace Jefferson – Associate Justice of the Texas Supreme Court (2001–2004) & Chief Justice of the Texas Supreme Court (2004–present)
Kevin A. Ross – Judge of the Los Angeles County Superior Court (1996–2005) & Judge on America's Court with Judge Ross (2010–present)
Clarence Thomas – Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States (1991–present)
Lynn Toler – Arbitrator on the court series Divorce Court (2001–present)[15]
Angela Tucker – Texas District Court Judge (2012–present)
Dale Wainwright – Associate Justice of the Texas Supreme Court (2003–2012)
David W. Williams – Judge of the United States District Court for the Central District of California (1969–2000)
Robert P. Young, Jr. – Justice of the Michigan Supreme Court (1999–present) & Chief Justice of the Michigan Supreme Court (2011–present)
Ambassadors[edit]
George Washington Williams – United States Ambassador to Haiti
Edward J. Perkins – United States Ambassador to the United Nations
Eric M. Bost – United States Ambassador to South Africa
Mifflin Wistar Gibbs - American Consul to Madagascar
TV personalities, authors and journalists[edit]
Michelle Bernard - Journalist
Hallie Quinn Brown - Author
C.L. Bryant – TV Host
Nannie Helen Burroughs - Author
Larry Elder – Author of 10 Things You Can't Say in America[16]
Robert A. George – Journalist
James Golden – Producer for The Rush Limbaugh Show (under the alias "Bo Snerdley")
Amy Holmes – News Anchor and political contributor on CNN
Zora Neale Hurston – Novelist
Michael King – Emmy Award-winning television producer
Raynard Jackson – Columnist and TV political analyst
Lenny McAllister – Author of Diary of a Mad Black PYC (Proud Young Conservative) and radio talk-show host from WVON-AM Chicago [17]
Tamera Mowry-Housley – Actress best known for co-starring in the sitcom Sister, Sister[18]
Deroy Murdock – Columnist for E. W. Scripps Company
Reverend Jesse Lee Peterson – President of the Brotherhood Organization of a New Destiny[19]
Jason Riley – Journalist
Shelby Steele – Author
George Schuyler – Journalist
Tommy Sotomayor – Radio and internet talk show host, YouTube personality, men's rights activist and film producer.[20]
Armstrong Williams – Author of Beyond Blame and TV host of On Point[21]
Military[edit]
Lieutenant General Russel L. HonorΓ©[22]
Lieutenant Colonel Frances Rice – Chairwoman of the National Black Republican Association
Major General Mary J. Kight – Adjutant General of California (2010–2011).[23][24][25]
Columnists[edit]
Stephen L. Carter – Christianity Today columnist, author of The Culture of Disbelief
Robert A. George – Columnist for the New York Post
Ken Hamblin – Denver Post columnist
Deroy Murdock – National Review columnist
Sophia A. Nelson – Chair ofPoliticalIntersection.comandpoliticalintersection.blogspot.com
Star Parker – President of the Coalition on Urban Renewal and Education, columnist & author
Thomas Sowell – Hoover Institute fellow and Author of Basic Economics
Ida B. Wells – Columnist
Walter E. Williams – Author of More Liberty Means Less Government
Athletes and entertainers[edit]
Ernie Banks – Chicago Cubs baseball player.[26]
James Brown – Musician. Openly endorsed Richard Nixon in the 1972 presidential election and named Strom Thurmond as one of his heroes during a 1999 interview with Rolling Stone.[27][28]
Nolan Carroll – Miami Dolphins football player and son of Jennifer Carroll, Lieutenant Governor of Florida
Wilt Chamberlain – Los Angeles Lakers basketball player
Ray Charles – Musician
50 Cent – Rapper. Supported George W. Bush in 2005,[29] but switched to the Democratic Party in support of Hillary Clinton in 2008[30]
Stacey Dash – Actress
Robert Griffin III – Washington Redskins football player
Dwayne Johnson ("The Rock") – Actor and WWE wrestler.
Mike Jones (wrestler) - Former WWF wrestler best known by the ring name Virgil.
Ronnie Lott – San Francisco 49ers football player
Don King – Boxing Promoter
Karl Malone – Olympic Gold medallist and basketball player[31]
Shaquille O'Neal – Olympic Gold medallist and basketball player
Joseph C. Phillips – Actor[32]
Jackie Robinson – Brooklyn Dodgers baseball player
Thurman Thomas – Buffalo Bills football player[33]
Cowboy Troy – Country Rapper[34]
David Tyree – New York Giants football player
Sheryl Underwood – Comedienne
Herschel Walker – Dallas Cowboys football player
Jimmie Walker – Actor
Kenny Washington – First black player to join the National Football League after it lifted its thirteen-year ban on black players in 1946
Bryan Clay - Decathlete
Education and Business[edit]
Michelle Bernard – President and CEO of the Independent Women's Forum
Herman Cain – former CEO of Godfather's Pizza, talk show host and one-time presidential candidate
George Washington Carver - Inventor
Ward Connerly – University of California Regent
Arthur Fletcher – Academic
Samuel B. Fuller – Businessman
James T. Harris III – 9th President of Widener University
George B. Jackson - Businessman
Dr. Mildred Fay Jefferson – First African American to graduate from Harvard Medical School
Alveda King – niece of Dr. Martin Luther King and senior fellow at the Alexis de Tocqueville Institution
Martin Luther King, Sr. – Father of Martin Luther King, Jr.
Stephen N. Lackey – Businessman
Vernon Robinson – Academic
Marvin Scott – Academic
Joshua I. Smith – Businessman
Thomas Sowell – Academic
Booker T. Washington – Academic
Vern Williams – Member of the National Mathematics Advisory Panel
Walter E. Williams – Academic
Civil Rights, Abolitionist and Activists[edit]
Octavius Catto – civil rights activist
Eldridge Cleaver – Leader of the Black Panther Party
James L. Farmer, Jr. – Civil rights leader
Ted Hayes – Activist for the Homeless
Dr. T. R. M. Howard – Civil Rights Campaigner
James Weldon Johnson – Activist
Scipio Africanus Jones - Activist
Charles Henry Langston - Abolitionist
James Meredith – Civil Rights Campaigner
Jesse Lee Peterson – Activist
Organizations[edit]
Abe Lincoln Black Republican Caucus
Insight America
Republicans for Black Empowerment
Congress of Racial Equality
American Civil Rights Institute
Project 21
Coalition on Urban Renewal and Education
National Black Republican Association
 

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