Could electrolysis be an energy storage medium for our next energy future

watchingfromafar

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Could electrolysis be an energy storage medium for our next energy future
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If we can decipher what causes a water molecule in saltwater to break apart, we can then re-unite the H2 and O releasing the heat in the reaction.

How does DC current passing through saltwater cause this molecule to split apart-?

Is it the frequency of the electric charge and if so can this same frequency be replicated by a similar means at less cost-?

In the Hoffamn Electrolysis apparatus shown here, the water molecule splits apart and H2 goes one way and the O goes the other way. Where does this separation take place, in the center or the (+) side or (--) side?

But most importantly, can the explosive reaction create enough heat energy to make it worthwhile?

For example, wind turbines produce energy when the wind is blowing but have no way to store this energy for later use. What if we used this excess electric energy to electrolysis seawater and store the hydrogen for future use-?
 

fncceo

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You get that it takes energy to power the reaction, right?

The 'electro' in electrolysis is there for a reason.
 

bripat9643

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Could electrolysis be an energy storage medium for our next energy future
View attachment 296524
If we can decipher what causes a water molecule in saltwater to break apart, we can then re-unite the H2 and O releasing the heat in the reaction.

How does DC current passing through saltwater cause this molecule to split apart-?

Is it the frequency of the electric charge and if so can this same frequency be replicated by a similar means at less cost-?

In the Hoffamn Electrolysis apparatus shown here, the water molecule splits apart and H2 goes one way and the O goes the other way. Where does this separation take place, in the center or the (+) side or (--) side?

But most importantly, can the explosive reaction create enough heat energy to make it worthwhile?

For example, wind turbines produce energy when the wind is blowing but have no way to store this energy for later use. What if we used this excess electric energy to electrolysis seawater and store the hydrogen for future use-?
The efficiency of the process is far too low.
 
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watchingfromafar

watchingfromafar

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Wind turbines produce energy when the wind is blowing but have no way to store this energy for later use. What if we used this excess electric energy to electrolysis seawater and store the hydrogen for future use-?

There are efforts being made to “store” the unused wind energy; as in the article below:

The biggest problem with wind and solar energy is that they're intermittent. There might be violent winds one day, and calm skies the next; broiling sunshine on Monday and 100% cloud cover on Tuesday. Some argue this problem is easily overcome by storing any excess energy in batteries until it's needed at a later time.

There have been successful pilot projects around the world showing you can set up solar panels that, after filling the grid, use any excess electricity to heat gravel, heat-carrying chemicals, or water stored in tanks deep underground. With enough insulation, the heat could be stored for months, until it’s needed in homes nearby, and delivered to them via pipes and heat pumps. (This heat energy can also be converted to run air conditioners, where cooling is needed instead of heating.)
Batteries can't solve all our energy-storage problem. Here's the solution

The above “storage” solution is to heat rocks which is a very inefficient means of storage. I still believe Electrolysis is the solution, store the hydrogen instead.
 

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