Bon Jovi's community restaurant opens in Red Bank

chanel

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It is a “community restaurant,” designed to feed fresh food to hungry people and to foster a sense of dignity and respect between two distinct customer bases.

“There are no prices on our menu,” said Jon Bon Jovi, who, with his wife, Dorothea, and a slew of volunteers, created the restaurant through his charitable organization, the JBJ Soul Foundation.

Patrons who can afford to dine out can leave a donation of $20 or more in an envelope on their table. Those with less money can earn a voucher for their meal through volunteer work at the Soul Kitchen — waiting tables, weeding in the organic garden, washing pots and dishes, or doing other chores.
Bon Jovi's community restaurant opens in Red Bank | The Asbury Park Press | APP.com

How long do you give it?
 

MeBelle

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I think it will do well.
Researching other community style restaurants, their failure seemed to be allowing anyone to eat for free.
Bon Jovi has that covered by having non-paying patrons volunteer @ the restaurant.

Panera is also working the same concept, but it is backed by the company for the eateries that are 'pay what you want'.
 
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chanel

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I think it will do well.
Researching other community style restaurants, their failure seemed to be allowing anyone to eat for free.
Bon Jovi has that covered by having non-paying patrons volunteer @ the restaurant.

Panera is also working the same concept, but it is backed by the company for the eateries that are 'pay what you want'.
There are a lot of wealthy people in that area that might help keep it going for a while. But I just can't see unemployed people going to an upscale restaurant and then washing dishes afterwards.

I am also very familiar with the over-regulation of small businesses in NJ. I imagine Bon Jovi will have to buy worker's comp insurance on all those "volunteers". And someone will sue for something eventually.

Next time I'm in the area, I might check it out. Red Bank is one of my favorite places.
 

Ravi

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I think it will do well.
Researching other community style restaurants, their failure seemed to be allowing anyone to eat for free.
Bon Jovi has that covered by having non-paying patrons volunteer @ the restaurant.

Panera is also working the same concept, but it is backed by the company for the eateries that are 'pay what you want'.
There are a lot of wealthy people in that area that might help keep it going for a while. But I just can't see unemployed people going to an upscale restaurant and then washing dishes afterwards.

I am also very familiar with the over-regulation of small businesses in NJ. I imagine Bon Jovi will have to buy worker's comp insurance on all those "volunteers". And someone will sue for something eventually.

Next time I'm in the area, I might check it out. Red Bank is one of my favorite places.
Volunteers everywhere are covered by workers comp if they receive something of value. In this case food.

Good morning, Debbie Downer!
 
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chanel

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Good to know. But I am still skeptical. The state, the insurance companies and the lawyers will get their "fair share" somehow. Esp. if it's successful.
 

Ravi

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Of course they will.

But what he's doing is actually a very "conservative" idea. Making people work for their handouts.

Maybe this is why we don't make welfare recipients work for their food stamps. The workers comp and liability to cover these government "employees" would add too much in costs.
 

Skull Pilot

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He's asking people to wash dishes and pick weeds in exchange for a meal.

Does he realize that that's a taxable event?

Tax Topics - Topic 420 Bartering Income
I dunno....I think it would fall more into the category of feeding your employees.
But the pay is in the form of food so therefore the cost of the purchase and preparation of that food is their pay and according to the IRS that is a taxable event.

For example, in my business I like to give my employees discounts but if I give too much of a discount (say I sold items at cost only to employees) I can actually get in trouble because the IRS would consider the product or service I discounted to too great a degree as income and I would have to report it on their W2s.
 

Dabs

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I think it's a neat idea....hell, why not give it a shot??
Others have tried weirder things.......and some work, some don't.....never hurts to try!
 
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chanel

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It is a neat idea and that's why I posted it. He's rich enough to fail. And I imagine he's rich enough to have a team of lawyers and tax accountant advising him. I am just skeptical whether or not it will work. This is the "Soprano State". Optimism about new ventures is not part of our culture.
 

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It is a neat idea and that's why I posted it. He's rich enough to fail. And I imagine he's rich enough to have a team of lawyers and tax accountant advising him. I am just skeptical whether or not it will work. This is the "Soprano State". Optimism about new ventures is not part of our culture.
As for the idea, and Mr. Jovi's willingness to spend his money in this manner - kudos...brilliant.
In practice, unfortunately it is likely to fail miserably. The cost will be staggering and I would doubt that private contributions will be enough.
I mean...what would you rather support...give $35 to buy raw ingredients to feed 5-6 people, or buy a quality piece of salmon to feed one?
 
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chanel

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Good poiny. But if they hire the right chef and the food is really good, the people will come. But in that case, if they show a profit, can they still be considered "non profit"?
 

FuelRod

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Good poiny. But if they hire the right chef and the food is really good, the people will come. But in that case, if they show a profit, can they still be considered "non profit"?
All "non-profit" means is that "profits" are put back into the business so, Yes.
 

High_Gravity

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I don't know if this will work but even it doesn't its not like Bon Jovi will be out in the streets.
 

jillian

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It is a “community restaurant,” designed to feed fresh food to hungry people and to foster a sense of dignity and respect between two distinct customer bases.

“There are no prices on our menu,” said Jon Bon Jovi, who, with his wife, Dorothea, and a slew of volunteers, created the restaurant through his charitable organization, the JBJ Soul Foundation.

Patrons who can afford to dine out can leave a donation of $20 or more in an envelope on their table. Those with less money can earn a voucher for their meal through volunteer work at the Soul Kitchen — waiting tables, weeding in the organic garden, washing pots and dishes, or doing other chores.
Bon Jovi's community restaurant opens in Red Bank | The Asbury Park Press | APP.com

How long do you give it?
i hope it does well. do you want it to fail?
 

Immanuel

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He's asking people to wash dishes and pick weeds in exchange for a meal.

Does he realize that that's a taxable event?

Tax Topics - Topic 420 Bartering Income
I dunno....I think it would fall more into the category of feeding your employees.
But the pay is in the form of food so therefore the cost of the purchase and preparation of that food is their pay and according to the IRS that is a taxable event.

For example, in my business I like to give my employees discounts but if I give too much of a discount (say I sold items at cost only to employees) I can actually get in trouble because the IRS would consider the product or service I discounted to too great a degree as income and I would have to report it on their W2s.
Although, technically, you are right, how low would an IRS agent have to be to... oh never mind, I think I just answered that question. :D

Immie
 

Noomi

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*shamelessly bumping this thread* ;)

To say to the OP that the restaurant is still open, and still going strong. :)
 

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