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1970 vs 2016 auto's

rahtruelies

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If it were possible to buy a new 1970 compact auto for its inflation adjusted 1970 price (around $14500) or a current typical compact auto your choice would be?
 

DGS49

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Why do you limit it to "compact"?

1970 was not a particularly good year, but among "compacts," a nicely-equipped Nova might work.
 

Redfish

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why is this in Politics?

The 1970s cars were mostly crap. I had several and none of them were any good.
 

Ringel05

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Amish_horse_and_buggy.jpg
 

NightFox

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If it were possible to buy a new 1970 compact auto for its inflation adjusted 1970 price (around $14500) or a current typical compact auto your choice would be?
No doubt about it, the current models. Current automobiles are light years ahead of a 1970's auto from the standpoint of features, safety, efficiency and quality not to mention they'll typically last at least twice as long.

In other words you're getting much more value for the money from today's automobiles, global competition has played a large part in that as well as enormous advances in technology.
 

deltex1

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Toyota Carolla....bought one in 1974 for 2509 dollars...lasted thru three kids partying thru college.
 

SavannahMann

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If it were possible to buy a new 1970 compact auto for its inflation adjusted 1970 price (around $14500) or a current typical compact auto your choice would be?

I agree that this doesn't really belong in politics, but the inflation adjusted price is not really accurate. First, most cars in the 1970's, including Toyota's, did not use fuel injection. This meant that the mileage and fuel economy was insufficient by modern standards. Second, the crash ratings of those 1970's cars would make them death traps by modern standards. Even the joke Smart cars have more protection for the occupants than a similar compact car from that era.

By the time you add in all those safety features, and pollution restrictions, and fuel economy requirements, you end up with a car that is much more expensive than the inflation adjusted car you started this thread with.

Volkswagen Beetles for example, inexpensive, reliable, easy to work on, easy to repair and replace. Once you add in all the mandated equipment, now is more expensive, heavier, and granted, more economical with gasoline. It is also safer, and more crashworthy.

The question is what would you want your kids in? A 1970's Toyota Corolla or a 2016 Toyota Corolla? Both have 4 cylinder engines. The modern one is heavier, goes farther on a gallon of gasoline, has reinforced doors to reduce intrusions into the passenger area, crumple zones to help absorb the impact, air bags to help cushion the G-Forces endured in an accident. Preloaded seat belts that automatically tighten when an accident happens. Produces Carbon Dioxide instead of Carbon Monoxide.

You would not only be giving up anti-lock brakes, but giving up disk brakes for drums, which are worse.

Now with all that to consider, you can still get some compact cars in the general ballpark of the price you're talking about. Kia and Hyundai and several other makers have cars in that general price range.
 

The VOR

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If it were possible to buy a new 1970 compact auto for its inflation adjusted 1970 price (around $14500) or a current typical compact auto your choice would be?
What kind of a question is that?

No rightie, in his or her right mind, could take a pass on a 1970 Ford Gremlin with its luxurious backseat where most of you righties that were born in the 70's were conceived.
32385040001_original.jpg
 
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rahtruelies

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Why do you limit it to "compact"?

1970 was not a particularly good year, but among "compacts," a nicely-equipped Nova might work.
Because that is what I have the pricing information in regard to and the personal familiarity with the vehicles.
 
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rahtruelies

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If it were possible to buy a new 1970 compact auto for its inflation adjusted 1970 price (around $14500) or a current typical compact auto your choice would be?
No doubt about it, the current models. Current automobiles are light years ahead of a 1970's auto from the standpoint of features, safety, efficiency and quality not to mention they'll typically last at least twice as long.

In other words you're getting much more value for the money from today's automobiles, global competition has played a large part in that as well as enormous advances in technology.

The seed of this topic is a conversation I had with some folks at a place called Eric Peters Autos. THEY firmly believe that their personal rights are being attacked (and I tend to agree) because it is illegal to manufacture or purchase that 1970 tech auto in the USA at any price. The politics of the legality is why I figure my topic is OK in this particular forum.
 
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rahtruelies

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If it were possible to buy a new 1970 compact auto for its inflation adjusted 1970 price (around $14500) or a current typical compact auto your choice would be?

I agree that this doesn't really belong in politics, but the inflation adjusted price is not really accurate. First, most cars in the 1970's, including Toyota's, did not use fuel injection. This meant that the mileage and fuel economy was insufficient by modern standards. Second, the crash ratings of those 1970's cars would make them death traps by modern standards. Even the joke Smart cars have more protection for the occupants than a similar compact car from that era.

By the time you add in all those safety features, and pollution restrictions, and fuel economy requirements, you end up with a car that is much more expensive than the inflation adjusted car you started this thread with.

Volkswagen Beetles for example, inexpensive, reliable, easy to work on, easy to repair and replace. Once you add in all the mandated equipment, now is more expensive, heavier, and granted, more economical with gasoline. It is also safer, and more crashworthy.

The question is what would you want your kids in? A 1970's Toyota Corolla or a 2016 Toyota Corolla? Both have 4 cylinder engines. The modern one is heavier, goes farther on a gallon of gasoline, has reinforced doors to reduce intrusions into the passenger area, crumple zones to help absorb the impact, air bags to help cushion the G-Forces endured in an accident. Preloaded seat belts that automatically tighten when an accident happens. Produces Carbon Dioxide instead of Carbon Monoxide.

You would not only be giving up anti-lock brakes, but giving up disk brakes for drums, which are worse.

Now with all that to consider, you can still get some compact cars in the general ballpark of the price you're talking about. Kia and Hyundai and several other makers have cars in that general price range.

I understand the differences in technology. BTW, that '1970' car could likely be built in a modern factory and sold at a profit for maybe $8 - 9K. Question is should consumers be by law denied that choice?
 
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rahtruelies

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If it were possible to buy a new 1970 compact auto for its inflation adjusted 1970 price (around $14500) or a current typical compact auto your choice would be?
What kind of a question is that?

No rightie, in his or her right mind, could take a pass on a 1970 Ford Gremlin with its luxurious backseat where most of you righties that were born in the 70's were conceived.
32385040001_original.jpg
Funny thing is most of the Grelins I saw at University back in the Day were driven by students in the Liberal Arts and YES their kids who survived the experience of libtard 1980's parenting ended up going Right politically.
 

NightFox

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If it were possible to buy a new 1970 compact auto for its inflation adjusted 1970 price (around $14500) or a current typical compact auto your choice would be?
No doubt about it, the current models. Current automobiles are light years ahead of a 1970's auto from the standpoint of features, safety, efficiency and quality not to mention they'll typically last at least twice as long.

In other words you're getting much more value for the money from today's automobiles, global competition has played a large part in that as well as enormous advances in technology.

The seed of this topic is a conversation I had with some folks at a place called Eric Peters Autos. THEY firmly believe that their personal rights are being attacked (and I tend to agree) because it is illegal to manufacture or purchase that 1970 tech auto in the USA at any price. The politics of the legality is why I figure my topic is OK in this particular forum.
I agree on the question of individual rights, the regulatory regime surrounding automobiles is quite ridiculous. If you want to buy and drive a 1970's tech auto (or build one) it's your right to do so and the government shouldn't have any say about it, however I'm not sure why anyone would want one outside of classic automobile collector.
 

TNHarley

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If it were possible to buy a new 1970 compact auto for its inflation adjusted 1970 price (around $14500) or a current typical compact auto your choice would be?
No doubt about it, the current models. Current automobiles are light years ahead of a 1970's auto from the standpoint of features, safety, efficiency and quality not to mention they'll typically last at least twice as long.

In other words you're getting much more value for the money from today's automobiles, global competition has played a large part in that as well as enormous advances in technology.
I agree. But repair costs are up. All that electric shit is rough on the wallet and labor costs.
Older machines were more simple. However, the luxury is undeniable.
 

pismoe

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If it were possible to buy a new 1970 compact auto for its inflation adjusted 1970 price (around $14500) or a current typical compact auto your choice would be?
---------------------------------------------------------------- i'd probably get a Datsun b210 or a comparable Honda Civic or Toyota something . Low end price , simple , good mileage , roll up windows , good enough for Groceries , wife , 2 kids and going to work in the winter in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan as it was not stopped by snow , was rear wheel drive with the Datsun . Early to mid 70s were best at least with the Datsun . In the early 80s they started getting 'tinny' in my opinion .
 

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