10 American industries that will boom in next 10 years

Luddly Neddite

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Booming industries for the next decade.

A new data release from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reveals which industries are going to grow the fastest between 2012 and 2022. Health care and technology, already giants today, are expected to keep up their rapid growth over the next decade. At the same time, manufacturing is expected to continue its rapid decline.

So if you're looking ahead to the future, here are the industries that are going to boom.
Mostly intuitive and logical.
 

midcan5

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It is that sort of myopic thinking that will ruin America, it will turn America more and more into a third world nation. Statically we are already third world when income inequality is used as the yardstick. If manufacturing is lost, the base of the nation's middle class is lost, if doing things becomes passe and talking on the phone / computer or tucking in beds is all we do, we may as well move to India for they already have many thousands of our IT jobs and data entry jobs. China will build things and Americans will buy their things, if they ever make planes, auto, and trains, oh wait a minute they do, soon we will be a dependent nation on a communist nation, who said free market capitalism wasn't wonderful. Lots below for the thinking American who doesn't buy into the BS and supports made in America.


'Made in the USA: The Rise and Retreat of American Manufacturing' Vaclav Smil

[ame=http://www.amazon.com/Made-USA-Retreat-American-Manufacturing/dp/0262019388/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8]Made in the USA: The Rise and Retreat of American Manufacturing: Vaclav Smil: 9780262019385: Amazon.com: Books[/ame]

"... But, asks Smil, do we want a society that consists of a small population of workers doing high-value-added work and masses of unemployed? Smil assesses various suggestions for solving America's manufacturing crisis, including lowering corporate tax rates, promoting research and development, and improving public education." from review

"In every society, manufacturing builds the lower middle class. If you give up manufacturing, you end up with haves and have-nots and you get social polarization. The whole lower middle class sinks." Vaclav Smil

This Is the Man Bill Gates Thinks You Absolutely Should Be Reading - Wired Science



"Thanks to the rules, many of which are written by corporations, a company can pull up stakes and use cheap foreign labor to make the same product it once did in America. It no longer has to meet environmental standards. It no longer has to abide by U.S. labor laws. It no longer has to pay a decent wage. Then the company can ship the product back to the United States where, courtesy of the rules, it will pay little if any duty. How can American workers hope to compete against that? They can't.

Lisa Gentner worked at a company called Carrollton Specialty Products, housed in a one-story warehouse in Moberly, Missouri, a town of 15,000 in central Missouri. Carrollton was a subcontractor for Hallmark Cards, the global greeting card giant based 125 miles west in Kansas City, Missouri. The largely female workforce of 200 provided the hand assembly for a variety of Hallmark products. They tied bows and affixed them to valentines and anniversary greetings. They glued buttons, rhinestones, and pop-ups inside birthday cards. They made gift baskets.

As in many towns across the country, the plant was an economic anchor for Moberly. Manufacturing is often pictured as a big-city enterprise, but a substantial number of plants are the lifeblood of small to medium-sized cities...."

Quote from p24 'Assault on the Middle Class' in 'The Betrayal of the American Dream' authors, Barlett and Steele.


"As massive volumes of Chinese government-supported solar cells and panels surged into the United States, prices in the domestic market collapsed. The Coalition for American Solar Manufacturing, in an October 2011 trade action, explained the consequences:

The resulting price collapse has had a devastating impact on the U.S. solar cell and panel industry, resulting in shutdowns, layoffs, and bankruptcies throughout the country. Over the past eighteen months, seven solar plants shutdown or downsized, eliminating thousands of U.S. manufacturing jobs in Arizona, California, Massachusetts, Maryland, New York, and Pennsylvania." Excerpt page 234, 'The Betrayal of the American Dream' Donald L. Barlett, James B. Steele


"I also used the opportunity to move beyond these subjects to what I think is the most critical problem in America today: child poverty... It’s a problem largely absent from our political debate. When candidate Romney, with embarrassing honesty, admitted that he wasn’t “concerned about the very poor,” he was simply expressing the common assumption that social safety nets effectively address the problem of poverty and that politicians ought therefore to concentrate on the middle class. Though President Obama is far too savvy to use such language, he appears to share this assumption: in his July speech outlining his second-term economic agenda, he talked about wages, infrastructure, and education, but there was not a word about child poverty. The current economic talking point — building the economy from the “middle out” — is the most recent effort to skirt the issue of poverty and frame Democratic programs in middle-class terms. (It should be noted that Obama’s original stimulus package did in fact direct more money to the poor, but such programs don’t seem to get much political traction.) The truth is that more than one in five U.S. children live below the poverty line, which puts the United States at the bottom of the pack among wealthy nations. Close to half of those poor children live in extreme poverty — with parental incomes of less than half the poverty rate. Some 13 percent of children are born into poverty, and for them it is likely to persist: most remain poor for at least half their childhood..." Jeff Madrick [The Anti-Economist] | Problem Number One, by Jeff Madrick | Harper's Magazine


In other wcrds, there has been a gradual undermining of the idea of a general social consensus. All of this has been fuelled by a slavish devotion to the rational certitude that there are absolute answers to all questions and problems. These absolute solutions have succeeded each other over the last twenty years in a jarring and disruptive way. At the same time the ability of governments to effect economic development has been severely handicapped by a growing reliance on service industries for growth ~ a sector dominated not by sophisticated items such as computer software but by consumer goods and personal consumer services. These sectors, it goes without saying, also flourish on labour which is part-time, low wage and insecure, thus creating a false sense of having solved part of the job-creation problem. This growth in services also leaves the Western economies dependent on the most unstable areas of economic activity, which is the first to collapse in an economic crisis. Put another way, service industries are to the economy what the uncontrolled printing of money is to monetary stability. They are both inflation.

These examples of a general decline stand out in contrast to state mechanisms which have never been so sophisticated. This sophistication has reached a level of complexity so great that the systems are, in truth. incomprehensible not only to the citizen, but to the most part of the political class. The latter, in a slothful loss of intellectual and practical self-discipline, have simply accepted that this is the way things must be. The resulting void in responsible leadership has allowed an hysterical brand of simplistic politics to rise and take power on the back of truisms, cliches and chauvinism, all of which fall below the intellectual level of Jenkins' Ear jingoism.

When President Bush, in his inaugural address. warmed to the theme of a kinder, gentler America, he said: "We know what works: freedom works. We know what's right: freedom is right. We know how to secure a more just and prosperous life for man on earth: through free markets, free speech, free elections." No one laughed at his absurd ordering of these three freedoms. The men of reason in the other political party, in his own party, in the media and in the universities found nothing to say.

Every word and concept of the wars of democracy and justice has been appropriated by those who traditionally opposed both and who seek power to undo what has been done. The moral sense of the eighteenth century has not only been turned upside down, this has been done with its own vocabulary. Thus Bush could give primacy to free markets over free men, as if to say that the right to speculate in junk bonds is more important than the removal of slavery. And Jefferson, Reagan could say, was against big government. Therefore, the forty million Americans without health care were not a government concern. But what Jefferson was against was unnecessary government - organisms which no longer contributed anything. He saw political power as a limited deck of cards. Those who held office were to play their hand carefully and endlessly, picking up old cards and putting down new ones, as old problems were solved and new problems arose. Those who seek and often gain power today use the vocabulary of the eighteenth century the way television evangelists use the Old Testament."

pps 237,238 'Voltaire's Bastards: The Dictatorship of Reason in the West' John Ralston Saul

For those who want to learn.

'The American Way of Poverty: How the Other Half Still Lives' Sasha Abramsky
'The Betrayal of the American Dream Hardcover' Donald L. Barlett, James B. Steele
'The Unwinding: An Inner History of the New America' George Packer
'To Serve God and Wal-Mart: The Making of Christian Free Enterprise' Bethany Moreton
'Invisible Hands: The Businessmen's Crusade Against the New Deal' Kim Phillips-Fein
'Merchants of Doubt: How a Handful of Scientists Obscured the Truth on Issues from Tobacco Smoke to Global Warming' Naomi Oreskes, Erik M. M. Conway
'The Rhetoric of Reaction: Perversity, Futility, Jeopardy' Albert O. Hirschman
'The Reactionary Mind: Conservatism from Edmund Burke to Sarah Palin' Corey Robin
'Voltaire's Bastards: The Dictatorship of Reason in the West' by John Ralston Saul
 

editec

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Industries that take the burden of having employees off the other industries will boom.

Day laboring will soon include professionals.

Count on it.
 

longknife

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Booming industries for the next decade.

A new data release from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reveals which industries are going to grow the fastest between 2012 and 2022. Health care and technology, already giants today, are expected to keep up their rapid growth over the next decade. At the same time, manufacturing is expected to continue its rapid decline.

So if you're looking ahead to the future, here are the industries that are going to boom.
Mostly intuitive and logical.
Another one of your Lefty BS posts.

The Health Care Industry to grow? You gotta be kidding me!!! :cuckoo: Doctors are closing their offices and getting out of the profession. The only healthcare will be exactly what Obama and the plutocrat Dems want - a government operated, single-payer mess with death panels and people dying for lack of care.

And technology is rapidly moving to other countries with more favorable rules and atmosphere. We already know that when you call for tech support, some guy or gal in India picks up the phone and you spend hours trying to understand their form of English.
 

SteadyMercury

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The Health Care Industry to grow? You gotta be kidding me!!! :cuckoo: Doctors are closing their offices and getting out of the profession.
We have an aging population, that leads to more healthcare services, which leads to increase in healthcare industry.

And technology is rapidly moving to other countries with more favorable rules and atmosphere.
No, it isn't. The tech industry is increasing other countries, but it isn't "moving" which implies a correlating decrease in the US. The US technology sector continues to expand even as those in places like India and China do.
 
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Luddly Neddite

Luddly Neddite

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Booming industries for the next decade.

A new data release from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reveals which industries are going to grow the fastest between 2012 and 2022. Health care and technology, already giants today, are expected to keep up their rapid growth over the next decade. At the same time, manufacturing is expected to continue its rapid decline.

So if you're looking ahead to the future, here are the industries that are going to boom.
Mostly intuitive and logical.
Another one of your Lefty BS posts."Lefty" means intelligent and well researched.

The Health Care Industry to grow? You gotta be kidding me!!! :cuckoo: Doctors are closing their offices and getting out of the profession. The only healthcare will be exactly what Obama and the plutocrat Dems want - a government operated, single-payer mess with death panels and people dying for lack of care. Wishing won't make it so.

And technology is rapidly moving to other countries with more favorable rules and atmosphere. We already know that when you call for tech support, some guy or gal in India picks up the phone and you spend hours trying to understand their form of English.
The US would be smart to keep up instead of whining about "English only".
 

midcan5

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Here's a piece that does a good job of explaining the dilemma today.

"What technological innovation seems to have done in both the European Union and the United States, a growing amount of research reveals, is cause a kind of "hollowing out" of the job market. While the number of high-wage and low-wage jobs have grown rapidly as a result of technical innovation, the number of mid-wage jobs—the kinds of jobs that we need if society* is to support a growing middle class, have lagged behind. Thus, even if the total number of jobs increase, and even if productivity rises, some very important kinds of jobs may be lost. The replacement of manufacturing jobs in the automotive and machine tool industries by robot labor, for example, did not tend to hit unskilled labor as dramatically as it did the skilled and highly-skilled medium-wage labor that used to be necessary to perform such work. The jobs that are available to these displaced well-paid highly-skilled workers now (if there are any jobs available at all) are typically low-paying unskilled ones of lesser status that do not allow them to maintain their previous position in the middle class, whatever the industry in which they may arise.69 More disturbingly, those who have been displaced may not eventually find work even if they are willing to retrain and accept lower wages. Economists who claim otherwise have simply never been unemployed. Retraining programs are notoriously ineffective and inefficient,70 and as anyone who has been unemployed knows all too well, people are reluctant to hire the overqualified even if they are willing to work for less than their skills and experience should command, and are similarly reluctant to give entry level positions to older individuals who do not fit the pre-existing image employers hold for that particular job. People who are displaced by technology may accordingly be displaced for life, and the fact that net employment opportunities ultimately increase is going to be of no comfort to them at all." https://politicalscience.stanford.edu/sites/default/files/workshop-materials/pt_reiff.pdf

'On Unemployment' Mark R Reiff 29 October 2012 Page 35

*See David Leonhardt, "Standards of Living Are in the Shadows as Election Issues," The New York Times (October 23, 2012).
 
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Luddly Neddite

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martybegan

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Luddly Neddite

Luddly Neddite

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Is it not surprising that the linked article totally ignored the single largest growth industry in the U.S.?



Oil and gas industry employment growing much faster than total private sector employment - Today in Energy - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

...and it will continue to do so
US has done more exploration and drilling because of President Obama than ever before.
More like in spite of.
Obama has signed ore permits than any other president.

Deal with it.
 

CrusaderFrank

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It is that sort of myopic thinking that will ruin America, it will turn America more and more into a third world nation. Statically we are already third world when income inequality is used as the yardstick. If manufacturing is lost, the base of the nation's middle class is lost, if doing things becomes passe and talking on the phone / computer or tucking in beds is all we do, we may as well move to India for they already have many thousands of our IT jobs and data entry jobs. China will build things and Americans will buy their things, if they ever make planes, auto, and trains, oh wait a minute they do, soon we will be a dependent nation on a communist nation, who said free market capitalism wasn't wonderful. Lots below for the thinking American who doesn't buy into the BS and supports made in America.


'Made in the USA: The Rise and Retreat of American Manufacturing' Vaclav Smil

Made in the USA: The Rise and Retreat of American Manufacturing: Vaclav Smil: 9780262019385: Amazon.com: Books

"... But, asks Smil, do we want a society that consists of a small population of workers doing high-value-added work and masses of unemployed? Smil assesses various suggestions for solving America's manufacturing crisis, including lowering corporate tax rates, promoting research and development, and improving public education." from review

"In every society, manufacturing builds the lower middle class. If you give up manufacturing, you end up with haves and have-nots and you get social polarization. The whole lower middle class sinks." Vaclav Smil

This Is the Man Bill Gates Thinks You Absolutely Should Be Reading - Wired Science



"Thanks to the rules, many of which are written by corporations, a company can pull up stakes and use cheap foreign labor to make the same product it once did in America. It no longer has to meet environmental standards. It no longer has to abide by U.S. labor laws. It no longer has to pay a decent wage. Then the company can ship the product back to the United States where, courtesy of the rules, it will pay little if any duty. How can American workers hope to compete against that? They can't.

Lisa Gentner worked at a company called Carrollton Specialty Products, housed in a one-story warehouse in Moberly, Missouri, a town of 15,000 in central Missouri. Carrollton was a subcontractor for Hallmark Cards, the global greeting card giant based 125 miles west in Kansas City, Missouri. The largely female workforce of 200 provided the hand assembly for a variety of Hallmark products. They tied bows and affixed them to valentines and anniversary greetings. They glued buttons, rhinestones, and pop-ups inside birthday cards. They made gift baskets.

As in many towns across the country, the plant was an economic anchor for Moberly. Manufacturing is often pictured as a big-city enterprise, but a substantial number of plants are the lifeblood of small to medium-sized cities...."

Quote from p24 'Assault on the Middle Class' in 'The Betrayal of the American Dream' authors, Barlett and Steele.


"As massive volumes of Chinese government-supported solar cells and panels surged into the United States, prices in the domestic market collapsed. The Coalition for American Solar Manufacturing, in an October 2011 trade action, explained the consequences:

The resulting price collapse has had a devastating impact on the U.S. solar cell and panel industry, resulting in shutdowns, layoffs, and bankruptcies throughout the country. Over the past eighteen months, seven solar plants shutdown or downsized, eliminating thousands of U.S. manufacturing jobs in Arizona, California, Massachusetts, Maryland, New York, and Pennsylvania." Excerpt page 234, 'The Betrayal of the American Dream' Donald L. Barlett, James B. Steele


"I also used the opportunity to move beyond these subjects to what I think is the most critical problem in America today: child poverty... It’s a problem largely absent from our political debate. When candidate Romney, with embarrassing honesty, admitted that he wasn’t “concerned about the very poor,” he was simply expressing the common assumption that social safety nets effectively address the problem of poverty and that politicians ought therefore to concentrate on the middle class. Though President Obama is far too savvy to use such language, he appears to share this assumption: in his July speech outlining his second-term economic agenda, he talked about wages, infrastructure, and education, but there was not a word about child poverty. The current economic talking point — building the economy from the “middle out” — is the most recent effort to skirt the issue of poverty and frame Democratic programs in middle-class terms. (It should be noted that Obama’s original stimulus package did in fact direct more money to the poor, but such programs don’t seem to get much political traction.) The truth is that more than one in five U.S. children live below the poverty line, which puts the United States at the bottom of the pack among wealthy nations. Close to half of those poor children live in extreme poverty — with parental incomes of less than half the poverty rate. Some 13 percent of children are born into poverty, and for them it is likely to persist: most remain poor for at least half their childhood..." Jeff Madrick [The Anti-Economist] | Problem Number One, by Jeff Madrick | Harper's Magazine


In other wcrds, there has been a gradual undermining of the idea of a general social consensus. All of this has been fuelled by a slavish devotion to the rational certitude that there are absolute answers to all questions and problems. These absolute solutions have succeeded each other over the last twenty years in a jarring and disruptive way. At the same time the ability of governments to effect economic development has been severely handicapped by a growing reliance on service industries for growth ~ a sector dominated not by sophisticated items such as computer software but by consumer goods and personal consumer services. These sectors, it goes without saying, also flourish on labour which is part-time, low wage and insecure, thus creating a false sense of having solved part of the job-creation problem. This growth in services also leaves the Western economies dependent on the most unstable areas of economic activity, which is the first to collapse in an economic crisis. Put another way, service industries are to the economy what the uncontrolled printing of money is to monetary stability. They are both inflation.

These examples of a general decline stand out in contrast to state mechanisms which have never been so sophisticated. This sophistication has reached a level of complexity so great that the systems are, in truth. incomprehensible not only to the citizen, but to the most part of the political class. The latter, in a slothful loss of intellectual and practical self-discipline, have simply accepted that this is the way things must be. The resulting void in responsible leadership has allowed an hysterical brand of simplistic politics to rise and take power on the back of truisms, cliches and chauvinism, all of which fall below the intellectual level of Jenkins' Ear jingoism.

When President Bush, in his inaugural address. warmed to the theme of a kinder, gentler America, he said: "We know what works: freedom works. We know what's right: freedom is right. We know how to secure a more just and prosperous life for man on earth: through free markets, free speech, free elections." No one laughed at his absurd ordering of these three freedoms. The men of reason in the other political party, in his own party, in the media and in the universities found nothing to say.

Every word and concept of the wars of democracy and justice has been appropriated by those who traditionally opposed both and who seek power to undo what has been done. The moral sense of the eighteenth century has not only been turned upside down, this has been done with its own vocabulary. Thus Bush could give primacy to free markets over free men, as if to say that the right to speculate in junk bonds is more important than the removal of slavery. And Jefferson, Reagan could say, was against big government. Therefore, the forty million Americans without health care were not a government concern. But what Jefferson was against was unnecessary government - organisms which no longer contributed anything. He saw political power as a limited deck of cards. Those who held office were to play their hand carefully and endlessly, picking up old cards and putting down new ones, as old problems were solved and new problems arose. Those who seek and often gain power today use the vocabulary of the eighteenth century the way television evangelists use the Old Testament."

pps 237,238 'Voltaire's Bastards: The Dictatorship of Reason in the West' John Ralston Saul

For those who want to learn.

'The American Way of Poverty: How the Other Half Still Lives' Sasha Abramsky
'The Betrayal of the American Dream Hardcover' Donald L. Barlett, James B. Steele
'The Unwinding: An Inner History of the New America' George Packer
'To Serve God and Wal-Mart: The Making of Christian Free Enterprise' Bethany Moreton
'Invisible Hands: The Businessmen's Crusade Against the New Deal' Kim Phillips-Fein
'Merchants of Doubt: How a Handful of Scientists Obscured the Truth on Issues from Tobacco Smoke to Global Warming' Naomi Oreskes, Erik M. M. Conway
'The Rhetoric of Reaction: Perversity, Futility, Jeopardy' Albert O. Hirschman
'The Reactionary Mind: Conservatism from Edmund Burke to Sarah Palin' Corey Robin
'Voltaire's Bastards: The Dictatorship of Reason in the West' by John Ralston Saul
...stopped reading after "income inequality"
 

Mr. H.

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william the wie

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Quick question since this is the stock market forum why no ticker symbols?
 

midcan5

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More on income equality - stop now if reality interferes with your ideology or fantasy world.

"One would think that such a macroeconomic disaster – one that robs the average American family of four of $36,000 per year in useful goods and services, and that threatens to keep Americans poorer than they might have been for decades, if not longer – would focus policymakers’ minds. One would think that America’s leaders would be clambering to formulate policies aimed at returning the economy to its pre-2008 growth path: putting people back to work, cleaning up underwater mortgages, restoring financial markets’ risk-bearing capacity, and boosting investment.

But no. Part of the reason is that, at the top, there is no crisis. According to the best estimates, the income share of America’s top 10% probably crossed 50% in 2012 for the first time ever, and the 22% income share that went to the top 1% was exceeded only in 2007, 2006, and 1928. The incomes of America’s top 10% are two-thirds higher than those of their counterparts 20 years ago, while the incomes of the top 1% have more than doubled."

Read more at J. Bradford DeLong asks why Americans are not clamoring for polices that would leave 90% of them better off. - Project Syndicate

=================================

'An Inequality Reading List' An Inequality Reading List by Ryan Cooper | Political Animal | The Washington Monthly

On doing some research for a thing on inequality, I’ve been surfing around and discovered a couple great published works that are worth your time:

1) The Price of Inequality, by Joseph Stiglitz. This is a fairly personal and polemical book that nonetheless has its economic case down, as one would expect. It has relatively less on the mechanisms of inequality, and more on the negative effects of same. Overall, quite good.

2) Getting Back to Full Employment, by Jared Bernstein and Dean Baker. This is a little bit more measured and formal book that is nonetheless even more convincing on the merits. What it loses in readability compared to Stiglitz it gains in comprehensiveness. Also very good.

3) “Inequality, the Great Recession, and Slow Recovery,” by Barry Z. Cynamon and Steven M. Fazzari. This zeros in on the particular issue how much inequality is bound up in our current troubles, making a pretty solid case that it has a lot to do with them. It’s an academic paper, but still pretty readable. Very interesting.

In any case, this will be a big topic of discussion in 2014, keep your eye on it. The takeaway, for now: inequality is a huge problem, both in itself and the obstacles it presents to recovery. The first step to remedy it is to pursue full employment by any means necessary.

By Ryan Cooper
 

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