You want to fix schools?

Discussion in 'Clean Debate Zone' started by Quantum Windbag, Sep 14, 2013.

  1. flacaltenn
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    flacaltenn USMB Mod Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

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    First off -- You have my admiration and support. And you can cash that check today (for all that's it worth :lol:) Even parents are aware of who the "mouth-breathing yahoos" are and believe it or not -- it's also annoying to us when their petty concerns become an issue.

    But here's the deal --- I don't believe that you or the teachers ought to be responsible for 70% of the items that you currently are. Govt mgmt of schools has evolved to make them a one-stop shop for physical/mental health, security and law, daycare, nutrition, entertainment monitors, and off-hours surveillance of their activities. That along with the massive paperwork required for the honor of recieving funding based on need have all buried the original intent of the product.

    It's a service industry. You design a product FIRST -- and then supply the appropriate superstructure for delivering it to the customer. HOPEFULLY, the product is customizable to individual requests and needs..

    The SCHOOL is not Hillary's village. There already exists services for all that extraneous child nurturing stuff. And EDUCATION will never improve until all those services are delivered in a better way..

    THe way I see it -- EVERYTHING ought to be "a la carte". With the classroom being the center of attention and even there --- there ought to be scads more flexibility and options.
    Which might mean --- a contractor for music, a contractor for vocational, maybe even a contractor for all that standardized testing and prep that teachers abhor.

    You know the value of virtual education by computer. The unions are fighting it. But I'd rather my kid get a physics lecturer from MIT virtually, and let the classroom teacher handle the overall learning that occurs around it..

    You folks need relief.. We need better educated kids and MORE OF THEM..
     
  2. Samson
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    Samson Póg Mo Thóin Supporting Member

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    Thanks for the discussion. I've picked out the most interesting comment for response.

    It is a LOCAL government service that is mostly locally designed, although the state, and particularly the Feds, kick in some funding based on how closely the public service resembles Federal laws designed to prevent discrimination of individuals based on race, religion, gender, and individual handicap, and most recently sexual orientation.

    The service is to educate the PUBLIC; not to educate just that portion of the public that is easy to teach. Somehow this fact surprises many new teachers, who seem to be under the impression the Public school somehow eliminates kids from broken homes, kids who have been abused, kids who are psychologically damaged, kids who are mentally ill, kids who are emotionally stunted, kids who are physically handicapped, kids who are poor, kids that do not speak English, etc., etc.

    You seem to be suggesting a seperate, (but equal?), customized school for each of the very few examples of imperfect students I have illustrated, leaving behind only the best and brightest kids to be educated in the public school.

    The only problem becomes; who is ideally left? Certainly nothing resembling the Real Public.

    The fact is, The Public isn't very pretty. People who choose to deal with The Public need to beware of this fact.
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2013
  3. auditor0007
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    auditor0007 Gold Member

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    Now there is a great idea, get rid of all sports. Let's have kids who aren't getting enough exercise as it is get even less. Instead of 33% of American kids becoming fat pigs, let's make it 67%. As for national testing standards, yes we need them and we actually have them. No Child Left Behind requires standardized testing for grades three through eight in math and reading. Here is the biggest problem with that. If a kid is already behind by third grade, the chances of getting that child back on track is very difficult. Kids learn at the fastest rate when they are younger. If a child is on track and doing well in first and second grade, there is a good chance that child will actually be ahead of schedule. On top of that, by understanding the basics, advanced learning becomes much easier and more enjoyable for the student.

    Think about this for a minute. Imagine two third graders taking a standard test to determine where they are. One child understands everything plus some. The other child is struggling to understand half of the material. Just based on that information, what odds would you give each child of finishing school successfully?. Which child is most likely to become class valedictorian? Which child is most likely to drop out? These questions are not difficult to answer. Here is the thing; we already know both children's future by the time they hit third grade. What that should tell us is that there has to be a concerted effort to get every child to understand the basics by third grade and to be on track at that point. First and second grade are the two most important years in a child's life, because this is when the foundation is set for every child to move forward. If a child is behind the eight ball by third grade, the chances for that child to excel diminish greatly. And if that child happens to live in the inner city and has parents who are less than interested in their own kid's education, it becomes an even bigger problem.
     

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