Words to Ponder from Coach Dungy

Discussion in 'Sports' started by Adam's Apple, Dec 28, 2005.

  1. Adam's Apple
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    Adam's Apple Senior Member

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    Dungy Remembers His Son
    by Fred Goodall, Associated Press
    December 28, 2005

    LUTZ, Fla. - Tony Dungy blinked back tears, straining to compose himself. "Parents hug your kids every chance you get," he said. "Tell them you love them every chance you get because you don't know when it's going to be the last time." He cautioned parents against taking their children for granted. “I never got to hug him again. That's one thing I'll always think about."

    The coach addressed his players during the service, calling them some of the greatest role models in the country and urging them to reach out to young people. "I want to urge you to continue being who you are because our young boys in this country, they need to hear from you," he said. "If anything, be bolder in who you are. Because our boys are getting a lot of the wrong messages about what it means to be a man in this world. About how you should act, and how you should dress, and how you should talk, and how you should treat people. They don't always get the right message, but you guys have the right messages."
     
  2. dilloduck
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    dilloduck Diamond Member

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    Dungy is a class act and I would be proud to have my son model himself after him. Someone has to give young males an idea of how to avoid being pressured into the roles feminists would like them to play.
     
  3. dmp
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    dmp Senior Member

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    Dungy seems like a very very very good man.
     
  4. GotZoom
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    GotZoom Senior Member

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    Boys as in African-American? Or boys in general?

    I am guessing boys in general.

    Either way...a class act all the way. In what he said and how he conducts himself.

    Not to sound like a cliche', but ... what is it going to take for parents to realize that their children's future and livlihood is in their hands every single day?
     
  5. dilloduck
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    dilloduck Diamond Member

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    Personal sacrifice and hard work.
     
  6. Adam's Apple
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    Adam's Apple Senior Member

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    Sometimes you can do everything right and still end up with disastrous results. I am sure people can relate to the following article from Dennis Prager.

    On the Suicide of a Child and Parents' Luck
    By Dennis Prager for World Net Daily
    December 28, 2005

    On four levels my heart goes out to Tony Dungy and his wife. First, the death of a child is the most painful loss a human being can experience. Second, the death of a child by suicide inevitably causes even more pain, as parents engage in self-doubt at best and self-recrimination at worst. Third, the uninformed at least initially wonder what the parents did wrong when a child commits suicide. So there is the possibility, if not likelihood, of humiliation added to the parents' terrible pain. Fourth, because Tony Dungy is so well known his son's suicide is known around the world.

    Given the widespread admiration for Tony Dungy as a man, not just as a coach – he is reported to be a kind, socially active churchgoer who apparently devoted many hours to being with his son – there is an important lesson to be learned from this tragedy.

    That lesson is this: There are children upon whom parents have had little influence. This is true for good children, and it is true of troubled children and even of some who turn out to be evil adults.

    It is almost axiomatic that parents usually play the major role in how their children turn out. I was the director of a college-age study institute where students came for a month at a time to live and study. The staff and I got to know these young people very well, and when we met the parents, we were rarely surprised. The finest ones usually had fine parents, and the unimpressive usually had unimpressive parents. Usually. But not always.

    There were times we were shocked at how different the parents were from their children. It is probable that every reader of this column knows at least one truly impressive person who came from a very difficult home. And many know the opposite: anti-social people who came from wonderful homes.

    Only parents fully understand how true this is. There is nothing in life as humbling as being a parent. Half what we are sure of before we become a parent has to be jettisoned when actually raising a child.

    The ancient Jewish high court, the Sanhedrin, required any judge sitting on that court to be married and have children. These life experiences were deemed necessary to have the wisdom and empathy required to render proper judgments.

    What we learn over time, from our own children and from the children of our friends, is how powerful are the traits built into our children – and not only those of personality and biochemistry, but more important and even frightening, of character. Some people are born good – naturally inclined to be kind, thoughtful and considerate of the impact they have on others; while for other human beings, empathy – the ability to put oneself in the place of another – is very hard and sometimes impossible to inculcate.

    In parenting, as in virtually every other area of life, as we get older we become increasingly aware of the role of luck – including how some children turn out. And that is why the only reaction any of us should have to the suicide of 18-year-old James Dungy is profound sorrow – for him, his parents and all those who loved him. From every account of that family, if it happened to them, it could happen to anyone.

    http://www.worldnetdaily.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=48101
     
  7. 5stringJeff
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    5stringJeff Senior Member

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    Agreed. It's hard to be a division rival of this guy - he's too respectable.
     

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