Why don't people watch films?

Discussion in 'TV Forum' started by Lucy Hamilton, Jan 29, 2016.

  1. Flopper
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    Flopper Gold Member Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    Good for you. Watching movies is like watching a colorized version of life instead of living it. However for some of us, that's all there is.

    Movies, plays, books are always rehashing old plots with different settings. For example, Star Trek was just a different version of the Wagon Train TV series. The Enterprise was the wagon train. Capt Kirk was the wagon master. The aliens were usually the Indians and outlaws. The crew of Enterprise were the settlers. The voyages of the Enterprise were wagon train trips to the west.
    And stories of each series were morality tales were general good triumphs over evil.

    There are only 7 basic plots as explained in this link.
    The Seven Basic Plots - Wikipedia
     
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  2. Flopper
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    Flopper Gold Member Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    What I meant was in the 1940’s most of the major action adventure spectaculars were popular because they offered first adventure, sword fights, gun fights, trains running off cliffs, airplanes crashing etc. Second, they were shot in color which was a huge draw since so many movies were in b&w. Lastly, they had recognized stars, not always the biggest in Hollywood but solid names guaranteed to draw and audience. They shot a lot of swashbucklers because ships and castles could be done very well on sound stages. Good scripts, stories, and good acting was not needed to make good money. Scripts were thrown together, actors and directors modified them the day of the shooting and since lines were easy as well as the acting, except for action scenes they were usually done in one take. The studios loved them because made money.

    That's not to say that all action adventure movies of 40's were bad. Here are some good ones with good acting, scripts, and story lines.
    The Treasure of the Sierra Madre
    Red River
    The Sea Hawk
    Sahara
    The Thief of Bagdad


    Although TCM owns the rights to a huge number of movies, there is still a lot that they never or seldom show. Here’s a link to a group of classic older movies that you can stream at no cost. Included is the “The Stranger” with Orson Welles. It’s a good suspenseful movie. "Meet John Doe is good". The Judy Garland 1954 version of "A Star is Born" is always a favorite but I think the 1937 version included in this section is a bit better, although not in color. They are not many action adventure movies in this group but they're some pretty good movies here.
    30 Hollywood Classics Streaming for Free in the Public Domain
     
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    Last edited: Jul 19, 2019
  3. Lucy Hamilton
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    Lucy Hamilton Diamond Member

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    Another very good 1940s Film Noir that I recommend. "He Walked By Night" made in 1948 and starring Richard Basehart, Jack Webb, James Cardwell and Scott Brady.

    Here is the full film in excellent picture quality, the duration of the film is 1 hour and 18 minutes:



    He Walked by Night - Wikipedia
     
  4. Lucy Hamilton
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    Lucy Hamilton Diamond Member

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    I love "The Thief of Bagdad" the 1940 version and I have it on DVD (there was a silent version made in 1924 and starring Douglas Fairbanks) but if anyone who does not have it on DVD or has never seen it before and wants to watch it The Daily Motion has uploaded it, the film of course was shot in Technicolor and so as well as being a great film it also looks very beautiful.

     
  5. Pogo
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    Pogo Diamond Member

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    OK speaking of old movies, time to fess up. Over the Christmas holiday I managed to borrow a DVD of "Gone With the Wind", a film I had never seen in a world where everybody claimed to have seen it. 80 years after it was released I finally saw it.

    What a profound waste of time. Three hours I'll never get back. All it told me was that Clark Gable sucked at acting. It reminded me why I don't watch films.

    Next movie I saw that someone gave me, was equally bad, "Half Nelson". Could have been a developable basis. I listened to the directors' comments and got the definite impression they have no clue what they're doing, admitting they dropped references that nobody got, and made grand assumptions that the viewer would conclude without having to explain dangling plot ends. What a stinker. I must admit I was always unsure why who directed a film is always highlighted but this one made clear how it can ruin a good idea.
     
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  6. froggy
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    froggy Gold Member

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    How about this one Lucy in disguise

    Screenshot_20200114-203636.png
     
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  7. Picaro
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    Picaro Gold Member

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    Re black and white films, some were in 'color', it's just that those were probably worn out and the b&w's are the only remaining relatively undamaged copies left. Many films were dyed, especially during the Silent era, but with the Depression and the loss of markets that was too expensive a process. As an example, early film stock couldn't photo graph clouds, so if those were needed in a scene, they had to be painted in by hand. This is why I find the 'anti-colorization' whiners so funny. And, re silents, the irony is the best copies that survive of of the worst movies, the good ones having been worn out by repeated running's. Buster Keaton kept copies of his in a safe, left there for decades before somebody decided to break it open, which is why we a good selection of his stuff around, while very little is left of Mack Sennett's or Harold Lloyd's shorts.

    Many of the 'classics' were really accidental hits, due to the factory line methods used to make films during the studio era, some directors being better than others, and some that are well thought of today weren't big hits in their times. Bogart's earlier movies were all made at the cheesy cheap studios as B movies; he just took off with the public for some reason. I never cared for his movies personally, my favorite black old b&w films are My Darling Clementine, Grapes Of Wrath, both with Henry Fonda, coincidentally, the Thin Man series, The Third Man, and some of the old war movies and some of the other westerns.

    Same with records; when one goes back and looks at the Billboard charts, you see very few of those 'great oldies' near the top; some years you have to get to Number 35 or below to find one you'll recognize. I have the Dupree's 50th Anniversary CD, autographed, and it is better by far than the original recordings, for example. And forget having ever heard of the better European artists here in the U.S.
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2020 at 12:54 AM
  8. froggy
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    froggy Gold Member

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    sealybobo Diamond Member

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    So glad to be back. I'm a changed man!
     

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