Why Do Christians Grieve?

Discussion in 'Religion and Ethics' started by Coloradomtnman, Mar 5, 2009.

  1. Coloradomtnman
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    Coloradomtnman Rational and proud of it.

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    If Christians (or any adherent of a monotheistic religion besides Judaism) go to Heaven, or Paradise, and live forever in complete bliss, then why do they fear death, grieve the loss of loved ones (even the ones who also believe), and react with such outrage when people are killed. Shouldn't they be happy for the dearly departed? Shouldn't they be rejoicing? Shouldn't they welcome death?

    "Hey, the terrorists just bombed us! Yay!"
    ********************************

    "Hey, Christy!"

    "Hi!"

    "Guess what?"

    "What?"

    "My kid just choked on a lincoln log and died!"

    "Oh, you must be so proud!"

    "Yeah, isn't it great?"
    **********************************
     
  2. LiveUninhibited
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    LiveUninhibited Caffeine Junkie

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    Maybe everybody has doubt deep down, or think people should have the chance to fully experience life before entering into a meaningless existence (bliss)? Or maybe they'll just miss the person in the meantime.

    Do babies who die in natural disasters get into heaven for free because they can't comprehend Jesus's sacrifice? The religious mind is very enigmatic to me as well.
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2009
  3. xsited1
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    xsited1 Agent P

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    Christians grieve because they miss them, because they have a void in their lives. It's called being human.
     
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  4. Amanda
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    Amanda Calm as a Hindu cow

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    It is an intriguing question. For me it's up there with why do non-believers bother to mock what they do not believe is true? Perhaps LiveUninhibited is on to something with "Maybe everybody has doubt deep down".

    It's certainly food for thought.
     
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  5. Care4all
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    Care4all Warrior Princess Supporting Member

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    Jesus mourned Lazerus's death, before He brought him back to life, that is.... :D

    "Blessed are those who mourn, for they shall be comforted"

    Mourning takes place among Christians or many that are religious, because we believe that God gave us humanhood as a gift...that our bodies are the temple of God, and any abuse to them is sort of a slap in the face of Him....so this gives people like us, a reason to believe that life has importance verses the spiritual alone, where there is no contact....where our souls might have come from in a sense...and for some reason, because of us subconsciously believing this, we feel a loss and pain when someone that lived on Earth, passes onward....because making the best of their human life, their gift, is over.

    of course this is just my opinion, but i think other Christians might feel the same....?

    Care
     
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  6. KittenKoder
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    KittenKoder Senior Member

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    Grieving stems from the fear of death, the unknown, in spite of all the faith and religious views no one truly knows what happens after death, and this scares them. Grieving itself isn't bad, it's the "holding onto" the life lost that is often unhealthy, many times turning into obsession. One of my best friends died a while ago, our little group went to the funeral, but right after we all went to celebrate ... you know what, we felt great the next day and talked about all the fun we had when she was alive. We remembered her, and many still do, but we also know you cannot dwell on it too much. Missing them is fine, but no one should ever "leave a hole" in you if they leave your presence in any way, clinging to the past like that, focusing on the one final event, trivializes the persons life, making what they did while living meaningless.
     
  7. Coloradomtnman
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    Coloradomtnman Rational and proud of it.

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    I'd even go so far as to say faith and religious beliefs stem from fear of death, the unknown, and meaninglessness.

    For the rest of your resonse: it seems like a healthy perspective. I haven't lost someone close to me, well, a human, but when the cat I'd owned since the age of 10 died when I was 26, I was crushed. Its been almost 6 years since her death and I still have moments when regret for not treating her better and not being there when she died (I was at a friend's) will blindside me and cause me to feel awful. Even writing this brings up those emotions. About two weeks ago I finally felt ready and adopted two kittens. I love them both and treat them like the most spoiled of children. Its in an effort to make up for those regrets I have about Cinnamon (my first cat). Not that they can do whatever they want (I bought a spray bottle), but I play with them, feed them very well, and make sure they get plenty of attention and love. This is how I make meaning of Cinnamon's life, so that she didn't live for nothing.

    For me, that is how we live on. In the memories of the ones who love us.
     
  8. KittenKoder
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    KittenKoder Senior Member

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    Actually, you are very correct. The whole purpose of religion was to give people a reason to live, and to do the right thing, by offering myths and lore about what happens after death (the punishment and reward). The difference is that when organized religion came into being they started this whole "you can only get a reward if you follow us, though if you do you can do anything you want and still get the reward". Thus is why the organized religion gathered so many followers (and why their leaders tend to be very corrupt). Lately the christian followers have grown beyond that, some of them anyway, and little by little they are starting to understand the folly of such beliefs and the harm it does to society. Muslims are recently starting to get it, but still it's very few of them as of yet.
     
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  9. Againsheila
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    Againsheila Gold Member

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    We don't grieve for them, we grieve for ourselves, because they are no longer in our lives.
     
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  10. Coloradomtnman
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    Coloradomtnman Rational and proud of it.

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    Do you fear death Care? Do feel doubt that when you die you'll go to Heaven? If there were no afterlife and when you die that's it, would you find that depressing?

    As an agnostic I fear death. I don't want to die. I don't want my experiences to end, and I don't feel as though I have achieved what I feel would make a lasting legacy. It is depressing to think that there is no afterlife. But, there are other ways for me to deal with such points of view and that is how I define my human spirit.
     

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