Why are the 10 commandments so bad to display?

Discussion in 'Religion and Ethics' started by fuzzykitten99, May 14, 2004.

  1. fuzzykitten99
    Offline

    fuzzykitten99 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2004
    Messages:
    2,965
    Thanks Received:
    199
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    You'll have to check the Marauder's Map...
    Ratings:
    +199
    This is being taken down after being up after nearly 50 years. I gotta know, how does this force you to think a certain way? How does this promote religion? Do these people know that our laws are BASED on the 10 commandments? Why is it so bad to "Honor thy father and they mother"? Why is it a bad thing to "...not steal"? Should we promote committing murder? Just because the origin of the 10 commandments is Christian, does not make it a bad thing.

    If someone wanted to put a verse from the Qu'ran, would these people object? Only if they want to be called racist.

    Whole story:
    ---------------
    10 Commandments Coming Down In Duluth

    A federal judge appears to have had the final word in the removal of a Ten Commandment monument outside City Hall.
    U.S. District Chief Judge James Rosenbaum on Thursday approved a lawsuit settlement that requires the city to remove the 7-foot-tall monument.

    Rosenbaum also denied a motion to block the settlement by a group of monument supporters -- the same group that Duluth leaders said on Thursday failed to gather enough valid signatures to put the issue up to a citywide referendum.

    "The monument must go," said Chuck Samuelson, executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Minnesota, who along with 10 Duluth residents filed the federal lawsuit in February saying the monument violates the Constitution's separation of religion and government.

    "This might actually, really and truly be over," Samuelson said.

    The settlement calls for the city to sell the monument to a nongovernment entity by Aug. 15. The city also agreed not to erect another monument anywhere on city property or take back the original monument.

    The city agreed that if it ever went back on its word, it would pay unspecified damages, attorneys fees and court costs, said Duluth City Attorney Bryan Brown.

    Also, if a referendum was passed and a monument was erected, the city would be in contempt of federal court, he said.

    Rosenbaum said lawsuit settlements cannot be the subject of referendums, Brown said.

    Monument supporters hit another snag when the city clerk's office said on Thursday that of 3,927 signatures turned in as of May 3, only 2,502 were acceptable, according to a memo to the City Council.

    The group needed 2,944 valid signatures to put it on the November 2005 city election ballot and 5,889 for a special election. More than 1,400 signatures were disqualified because the people were not registered to vote or didn't live in Duluth or for other reasons.

    The Fraternal Order of Eagles Aerie 79 gave the monument to the city in October 1957. The settlement calls for the monument to be housed out of the public's view until a buyer can be found.

    Several local churches have offered to prominently display the monument on their front lawns. The city first must undergo a bidding process.


    click for link to story
     
  2. dmp
    Offline

    dmp Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 12, 2004
    Messages:
    13,088
    Thanks Received:
    741
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Enterprise, Alabama
    Ratings:
    +741
    Liberals tend to be afraid of God.
     
  3. Reilly
    Online

    Reilly Guest

    Ratings:
    +0
    The Ten Commandments are not themselves bad, and the prohibitions themselves for the most part pre-date the origination of the Commandments (the Jews not being the first civilization to prohibit murder and theft). It is their display which is forbidden.

    Our laws are historically and culturally based on a number of sources, and the government is allowed to display the Ten Commandments within a larger display paying homage to the sources of our law. The government cannot display the Ten Commandments alone because that would indicate government support/ endorsement for a religion, which is forbidden (as is government support for any religion)

    It is the same as the City of Duluth placing a large monument to the Koran in front of the Courthouse. The question isn't whether "these people" would object to such a display (I think they clearly would), but how would you feel about such a display? If this would bother you, then that should help you understand why this exhibiting of the Ten Commandments is forbidden.
     
  4. DKSuddeth
    Offline

    DKSuddeth Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2003
    Messages:
    5,175
    Thanks Received:
    61
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    North Texas
    Ratings:
    +62
    is that a generalization? :D
     
  5. NewGuy
    Online

    NewGuy Guest

    Ratings:
    +0
    Actually, you contradicted yourself. One written Ammendment will let no law for or against religion to be passed and another will not let the government show favoritism of one. Given the documents origins and wordings, it is clear that this is the letter of the law with Christianity as the spirit of the law.

    The citizens can endorse whatever they want wherever they want. The government cannot stamp approval on it. A koran on a wall, or the 10 Commandments are equal in a courtroom or anywhere else with one exception.

    -Which one founded our nation?
    :D

    That would mean you could display either unrestricted, but only one is even reasonable while the other would look rather stupid.

    That is irrelevant and illegal. You have a freedom OF religion, not FROM religion.
     
  6. Zhukov
    Offline

    Zhukov VIP Member

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2003
    Messages:
    3,492
    Thanks Received:
    301
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Location:
    Everywhere, simultaneously.
    Ratings:
    +301
    Liberals tend to be afraid of the Christian God.
     
  7. DKSuddeth
    Offline

    DKSuddeth Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2003
    Messages:
    5,175
    Thanks Received:
    61
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    North Texas
    Ratings:
    +62
    another generalization?
     
  8. dmp
    Offline

    dmp Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 12, 2004
    Messages:
    13,088
    Thanks Received:
    741
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Enterprise, Alabama
    Ratings:
    +741
    Semantics.
     
  9. Zhukov
    Offline

    Zhukov VIP Member

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2003
    Messages:
    3,492
    Thanks Received:
    301
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Location:
    Everywhere, simultaneously.
    Ratings:
    +301
    How does displaying the 10 Commandments constitute making a law that establishes a religion? And which religion is it?
     
  10. Zhukov
    Offline

    Zhukov VIP Member

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2003
    Messages:
    3,492
    Thanks Received:
    301
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Location:
    Everywhere, simultaneously.
    Ratings:
    +301
    Generalizing is the mother of wisdom.


    No, not at all. It is an important distinction. Liberals support the display of all things judaic, islamic, buddhist, et cetera. It's Christianity liberals have a problem with.
     

Share This Page