Who Wants to Be A Millionaire and Russia

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Dr.Traveler, Jan 25, 2013.

  1. Dr.Traveler
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    Dr.Traveler Mathematician

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    Sociology and Who Wants To Be A Millionaire

    Interesting article, but it turns out in Russia the Ask the Audience option is a terrible lifeline. It isn't because of education, but instead because in Russian the culture is that they don't like rewarding someone seeking to succeed on their own.
     
  2. Abishai100
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    Abishai100 VIP Member

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    Indian Version: Folk Buffet

    This is indeed an interesting topic for our times. Consumerism culture favors a couture of convenience wealth access and goods access.

    It started with the famous radio game shows in America but then expanded into the federally endorsed state lotteries which became a governmental form of tax-conscious tithing.

    The Russian economy has been characterized as a system of scrounging. Capitalism has not flourished, and the streets seem governed by black markets and the unfiltered distribution of American brands such as Pepsi.

    In India, the version of "Who Wants to Be A Millionaire" (Regis Philbin) is called "Kaun Banega Crorepati" (Amitabh Bachan). The spirit of the show and the cheers of the audience reflect India's version of democratic capitalism --- mob psychology. The questions, answers, and hosting are symbolic of wealth access colloquialization, so there are a good deal of folk empathy jokes.

    The globalization of capitalism seems to condone a liberal licensing of this trademarked TV program.



    :afro:

    Kaun Banega Crorepati - Wikipedia the free encyclopedia



    bachan.jpg
     

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