White supremacy and mass incarceration

Discussion in 'Race Relations/Racism' started by TruthOut10, Jan 23, 2013.

  1. TruthOut10
    Offline

    TruthOut10 Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2012
    Messages:
    627
    Thanks Received:
    88
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Ratings:
    +88
    Republicans join the Left in calls for American prison reform but ignore the relevance of racism and social justice.

    In a 2011 opinion piece in the Washington Post, Newt Gingrich said, “There is an urgent need to address the astronomical growth in the prison population, with its huge costs in dollars and lost human potential…The criminal justice system is broken, and conservatives must lead the way in fixing it.” An advocacy group called Right on Crime is spearheading Republican efforts to “demand more cost effective approaches that enhance public safety.” Signatories to its statement of principles include, in addition to Gingrich, other notable Republicans like Jeb Bush and Grover Norquist. A recent Washington Monthly article celebrated the right’s new focus on crime claiming it would “put the nation on a path to a more rational and humane correctional system.”

    But by focusing on achieving “a cost effective middle ground,” Republican reform strategies end up eschewing the relevance of social justice and largely ignoring racial disparities and the disruptive social costs created by mass incarceration.

    Justice and white supremacy

    The travesty of mass incarceration and its devastating social effects and of the malfeasance of American jurisprudence cannot be measured purely in terms of economic rationality. It is an issue deeply entwined with long histories of racial oppression and white supremacy. True reform will require grappling with this larger problem.

    A 1987 Supreme Court case illustrates what I mean when I say that the justice system is saturated with racism. In McCleskey v. Kemp, the Court declined to define the death penalty as racially discriminatory. The case involved the appeal of the death sentence for Warren McCleskey, a Georgia man convicted of armed robbery and the murder of a white policeman. In his appeal McCleskey cited research analysing 2000 Georgia homicides over an eight year period beginning in 1972 that found black defendants were nearly twice as likely to be sentenced to death as white defendants.

    The research, described as the “most sophisticated study of the criminal justice system in the 20th century,” also found that the death sentence was applied 4.3 times more often when the murder victim was white. McCleskey’s appeal (based upon the 14th Amendment guarantee of equal protection and the 8th Amendment prohibition against cruel and unusual punishment), argued that the death sentence was racially biased. Justice Powell, in the majority opinion, accepted the general validity of the data and the likelihood that race was a factor in death penalty cases, but wrote that in the specific case of Warren McCleskey there was no proof of “the existence of purposeful discrimination.”

    In the analysis of Bryan Stevenson, Executive Director of the Equal Justice Initiative (EJI), the Supreme Court’s decision in McCleskey upholds the constitutionality of the Georgia death penalty, even while it validates the data showing clear racial bias. Stevenson summed up the case by arguing that in McCleskey v. Kemp the Supreme Court viewed the problem of racial bias as “too big” to confront.

    Indeed, in the majority opinion Justice Powell wrote that “if we accepted McCleskey's claim that racial bias has impermissibly tainted the capital sentencing decision, we could soon be faced with similar claims as to other types of penalty… ince McCleskey's claim relates to the race of his victim, other claims could apply with equally logical force to statistical disparities that correlate with the race or sex of other actors in the criminal justice system, such as defence attorneys or judges.”

    In effect, the Court declined to recognise that racism and white supremacy were factors in the administration of justice. “The Court,” Stevenson argued, “said if we recognise disparities based on race in the administration of the death penalty it’s going to be just a matter of time before lawyers begin complaining about race disparities for other kinds of criminal offences…”

    McCleskey v. Kemp powerfully reinforced white supremacy in the administration of justice by obscuring a long American history of systematic racial violence and oppression, and normalising racial bias and racial disparities in sentencing. Although the decision was a specific deliberation on racial bias and the death penalty, its logic clearly ramifies throughout the entire criminal justice system.

    White supremacy and mass incarceration - Opinion - Al Jazeera English
     
  2. LibertyLemming
    Offline

    LibertyLemming Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2012
    Messages:
    1,975
    Thanks Received:
    147
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    USA
    Ratings:
    +147
    I don't feel like reading the words of someone else if you can't summarize your own thoughts; however, it is disgusting the rate at which minorities are locked up verses white people. I don't know if it is inherent racism as much as the minorities being in poverty more often and therefore more likely to commit crimes. The first thing we should do is quit putting people in cages for crimes that don't produce a victim. That would even things out quite a bit.
     
  3. TruthOut10
    Offline

    TruthOut10 Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2012
    Messages:
    627
    Thanks Received:
    88
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Ratings:
    +88
    Because this isn't new at all with the "mass incarnation" of Black People whatsoever, there was a PBS special about this last year.

    PBS Film | Slavery By Another Name

    I started reading the books months ago, sorry to say I never got a chance to finish it. But did record and watch the PBS Documentary. So if you don't want to read you can watch the documentary"

    Watch the Film | Slavery by Another Name | PBS
     
  4. hortysir
    Offline

    hortysir In Memorial of 47

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2010
    Messages:
    15,593
    Thanks Received:
    2,884
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Lakeland, FL
    Ratings:
    +2,884
    Why do usernames with the word "truth" in them turn out to be the biggest moonbats?

    :cuckoo:
     
    • Thank You! Thank You! x 2
  5. TruthOut10
    Offline

    TruthOut10 Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2012
    Messages:
    627
    Thanks Received:
    88
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Ratings:
    +88
    Let's be real, this is an "adult conversation" trying to take place in this thread. This isn't one of many regular threads in here that most just throw up to attack people of color. So would you care to share with the rest of us where the "truth" wasn't part of this article?

    I can lower myself to your level and "Flame On" just like the next person, but when I bring the conversation level up a few notches, it usually throws peeps like you for a major loop and don't quite know how to respond besides attacking the poster, hoping they take the bait and thus taking the conversation in a completely different direction. Sorry to disappoint you on this one, conversation shall remain over your head.
     
  6. hortysir
    Offline

    hortysir In Memorial of 47

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2010
    Messages:
    15,593
    Thanks Received:
    2,884
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Lakeland, FL
    Ratings:
    +2,884
    Your thread title pulled you into the gutter.
    Waller there and be happy.

    I asked you a legitimate question in your other thread.
    Answer that, then we'll move on from there
     
  7. TruthOut10
    Offline

    TruthOut10 Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2012
    Messages:
    627
    Thanks Received:
    88
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Ratings:
    +88
    Sam Pollard might not be a household name outside of film industry circles, however, if you’ve ever watched Style Wars, Juice or When the Levees Broke, you know his work. For the last four decades, Pollard has edited, directed and/or produced some of the most important films about the Black experience. Also known as Spike Lee’s go-to editor—on movies such as Jungle Fever and Bamboozled as well as documentaries like the Oscar-nominated 4 Little Girls—he has now grabbed the reins of his own project.

    Pollard’s latest is Slavery By Another Name, an illuminating documentary about the new system of human labor trafficking and involuntary servitude that White Southerners developed to subjugate many African-Americans for years after the abolition of slavery. The film is adapted from a Pulitzer Prize-winning book of the same name by journalist Douglas Blackmon and features narration by Laurence Fishburne. BlackEnterprise.com caught up with Pollard to discuss the film, which premieres tonight, February 13, 2012 at 9pm EST on PBS, and how it opens a door to a largely forgotten episode of American history.

    Sam Pollard's Slavery By Another Name Documentary
     
  8. hortysir
    Offline

    hortysir In Memorial of 47

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2010
    Messages:
    15,593
    Thanks Received:
    2,884
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Lakeland, FL
    Ratings:
    +2,884
    I asked YOU a question. Not Sam
    :eusa_hand:
     
  9. TruthOut10
    Offline

    TruthOut10 Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2012
    Messages:
    627
    Thanks Received:
    88
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Ratings:
    +88
    News Flash!!!!

    I don't need you to legitimize myself or the thread I posted, I don't have time for childish games or entertain someone such as yourself who dismissed this based on the title, which happens to be the title of the book and documentary.

    And you think I need to justify myself to you? :cuckoo:
     
  10. squeeze berry
    Offline

    squeeze berry Gold Member

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2010
    Messages:
    6,675
    Thanks Received:
    651
    Trophy Points:
    138
    Location:
    virginia
    Ratings:
    +659
    translation

    blacks are stupid are are easily caught
     

Share This Page