Where's Global Warming

Discussion in 'Environment' started by KittenKoder, Feb 26, 2009.

  1. KittenKoder
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    KittenKoder Senior Member

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    In Seattle we are experiencing our THIRD snowstorm in as many months, of course it probably won't hang on too long like that last two. So ... even I am now asking: Aren't we suppose to be getting warmer? There's another storm heading from the East to, hitting eastern states that they mentioned. Right now I am seeing an inch fall ... right in downtown.
     
  2. dilloduck
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    dilloduck Diamond Member

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    Be grateful for the precipitaton--even I ( the original 'I hate winter' dude ) would accept snow right now. We're gonna dry up and blow away.
     
  3. KittenKoder
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    KittenKoder Senior Member

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    You're in Texas dude .... and you're complaining about being dry. *giggle* Sorry, that just seems like irony to me.

    The last few years in Seattle we were lucky to get a little snow, so it was easy to assume that we were warmer, until you look at our past. We go through cycles, a few years of dry winters followed by a few years of snow storms. So it's still normal weather for us. Almost all states go through cycles like that. Hell, about 10 years ago I was in Tucson, and we got snow .. it melted once the sun came out, but it snowed one entire night.The 5+ years I lived there that was the only time it happened, but it wasn't something those who lived there their whole lives were surprised about, they said it happens once in awhile.
     
  4. dilloduck
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    dilloduck Diamond Member

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    ahhh One of those that still thinks Texas is a desert and we all ride horses.

    The river behind my son in this pic is totally dry as are many wells. ( yes we drink water too ).

    [​IMG]
     
  5. KittenKoder
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    KittenKoder Senior Member

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    No, but desert states, like Arizona and Texas, are not "wet" by any standard. Pretty pond, but here's how you can tell it's a "dry" pond, look at the trees. We'll compare to the notoriously wet Western Washington, here the trees almost always grow right up to the water level all year long, the reason isn't because there is less water but because the water level doesn't change enough to see the difference. Show a pic of that same spot from two points in the year, mid summer and mid winter, and you will be able to see what I mean. Being 'dry' means that there are periods of drought, not that the entire area is always in drought, that's dry and arid such as the Sahara. Eastern Washington is dry, about the same as Tucson, but not nearly as bad as other areas in both Arizona and Texas. If there was drought all the time then there would only be a few trees total, and they would be only one species of tree. However, near the lakes the area always looks better than further away. Show a pic of the middle of Austin ... right downtown. It's the same as Pheonix ... been to both myself.
     
  6. dilloduck
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    dilloduck Diamond Member

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    Read carefully---that is a RIVER --not a pond and Texas is far from being a desert state. There are no trees next to the RIVER because flooding has washed them all down the river. The aquifers are dropping to unheard of levels in some counties. No, Texas is not the Amazon rain forest but trust me, we usually get a hell of a lot more rain than this.
     
  7. KittenKoder
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    KittenKoder Senior Member

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    Okay ... my reference to "pond" may have been wrong, so I amend it to "creek".

    The tree line changing because of the changes in water level ... I aid that already. I also explained the difference between "getting a lot of rain" and being "a wet or dry place". The difference isn't the amount of rain, Tucson has a much higher rainfall in inches per year than Seattle, but how often. Western Washington gets rain all year round, though mostly just light rain. This keeps the ground wet and the water table is stable throughout the year, rarely dipping or rising much more than a couple of inches. One benefit to being a wet area is that the tree roots intertwine more and support each other, so the occasional flood (about one every several years) does not "wash them down the river", however, if the ground is dry more often than moist then the tree roots are shallow, so when a flooding does occur the trees are easily ripped from the shoreline. Last year the lower Green River flooded by three feet (if I remember well), it's the creek sized part of the river thankfully, The trees that stretched to the shore are still there, only a few were broken loose. Dry areas have more clay, this is how they are able to keep small rivers, and ponds in spite of long drought periods, however it does not allow most plant life to drink from it, thus why the trees look like dwarfs compared to ours, and why they have a lot less green.

    You know it just dawned on me, why the hell do you even care about whether your state is dry or not? Is there some unwritten rule that calling someplace dry is now an insult?
     
  8. del
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    he probably gets thirsty once in awhile.
     
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  9. Old Rocks
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    Global Warming Debate Heats Up in the Pacific Northwest as Air and Water Temperatures Rise Faster Than World Average
    Tuesday November 8, 2005
    When it comes to weather, the Pacific Northwest is best known for its legendary rain, but the region may be on its way to becoming the poster child for the effects of global warming and climate change.

    The Pacific Northwest is warming faster than most other places in the world, according to a new study released in October by the Climate Impacts Group at the University of Washington and the Puget Sound Action Team, which defines, coordinates and implements Washington state’s environmental agenda for Puget Sound, the region’s most vital marine habitat.

    While average global temperatures rose 1.1 degrees Fahrenheit during the 20th century, Northwest winters have warmed 2.7 degrees since 1950, in part because of cycles in ocean conditions. Water temperatures are escalating, too, and water levels are rising at a rate that is outpacing world averages. Scientists are already seeing dramatic effects from these changes, from changes in snowmelt and river flows to deadly consequences for fish and other marine life, and those effects will quickly become worse if action isn’t taken.
    Global Warming Debate Heats Up in the Pacific Northwest as Air and Water Temperatures Rise Faster Than World Average
     
  10. Old Rocks
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    In our own backyard, much of the state of Texas -- 97.4% to be exact -- is now gripped by drought, and parts of it by the worst drought in almost a century. According to the New York Times, "Winter wheat crops have failed. Ponds have dried up. Ranchers are spending heavily on hay and feed pellets to get their cattle through the winter. Some wonder if they will have to slaughter their herds come summer. Farmers say the soil is too dry for seeds to germinate and are considering not planting." Since 2004, in fact, the state has yoyo-ed between the extremities of flood and drought.

    Peak Energy: How Dry Are We ?
     

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