Where the Jobs Are

Discussion in 'Economy' started by Adam's Apple, Jul 6, 2005.

  1. Adam's Apple
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    Adam's Apple Senior Member

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    Where the Jobs Are
    By Marty Nemko for www.martynemko.com
    July 2005

    Twenty percent of the developed world's employment could be affected by global outsourcing, according to a new study by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. These are not just the sorts of jobs we’ve already heard about—for example, customer service, radiologists, accountants, and programmers--but librarians, statisticians, chemical engineers and even air traffic controllers.

    Heretofore, large corporations have been the major outsourcers. For example, the New York Times reported that IBM is laying off 13,000 US and European employees and hiring 14,000 in India. And even a growing number of mom-and-pop operations are turning to places like Sri Lanka, China, Mexico and Eastern Europe, for example, to make clothes, jewelry, and software.

    But all is not lost for Americans. According to Joel Kotkin, author of Inc. Magazine’s “Best Places for Doing Business in America,” more companies are also homeshoring: “seeking workers and suppliers in smaller US cities that aren’t burdened by the exorbitant taxes, housing prices, labor costs and regulatory hurdles seen in many larger cities.” Inc.’s Top-10 best places to do business in the US: Reno, NV, Boise, ID, Casper, WY, Green Bay, WI, Medford, OR, Riverside/San Bernardino, CA, Melbourne-Titusville-Palm Bay FL, Missoula, MT, Ft. Myers/Cape Coral, FL, and Jacksonville, FL.

    Florida, the state with the most cities on the Inc list has created 250,000 new jobs in the last year. Warren May, spokesman for the state-run Agency for Workforce Innovation says, “Professional and business services such as banking and insurance have been leading the jobs growth. And health care services are right up there because of Florida’s large senior population, and there has been a remarkable turnaround in manufacturing.” Florida’s unemployment rate: 4.4 percent.

    And Florida doesn’t even have the nation’s lowest rate. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, these do: Wyoming (2.9%), Hawaii (3.0%), Virginia (3.0%), North Dakota (3.3%) and South Dakota (3.7%).

    The Bureau of Labor Statistics provides support for Inc. Magazine’s assertion that jobs are moving from the major cities. The cities reporting the highest percentage job growth in the past 12 months: Yuma, AZ (+10.8 percent), St. George, Utah (+9.6%), Las Vegas/Paradise NV (+7.4%), Coeur d’Alene, ID (+6.9%), Blacksburg-Christiansberg-Radford VA (+6.4%) and Mt.Vernon-Anacortes, WA (+5.8%). Among large cities, the worst performer was Detroit (-1.1%.)

    The counties showing the largest percentage of job growth are: Rutherford, TN (+9.2%), Clark, NV.(+7.4%), Riverside, CA (+7.2%) Elkhart, IN (+6.8%), Montgomery, TX (+6.6%), Lee, FL. (+61.%), Prince William, VA (+5.8%), Washington, Utah (+5.3%), Loudoun, VA (+5.3%), and Sarasota, FL (+5.1%.)

    Of course, even if you move to a hotspot, the job market will be stronger in certain fields. Here are the nationwide biggies:

    for entire article:
    http://www.martynemko.com/pub/articles/wherethejobsare.shtm
     
  2. -Cp
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    -Cp Senior Member

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    Here's a better idea - stop worring about jobs, and START YOUR OWN BUSINESS!!

    Gee, what a concept - but it's something (IMO) that's far more rewarding than slaving away for someone else..
     
  3. Adam's Apple
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    Adam's Apple Senior Member

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    Somewhere I was reading recently that people should begin thinking about starting their own businesses if they want job security. I wish I could remember where I read that now. It was a pretty good article, predicting that jobs would not be as plentiful as they once were and that the American education system--and American attitudes toward getting a higher education--will have to change completely to enable American workers to compete with countries where education is taken very seriously (China, Japan, India, etc.)
     

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