When visiting the White House, don't touch the furniture

Discussion in 'Politics' started by Gabriella84, Jun 21, 2005.

  1. Gabriella84
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    Gabriella84 Guest

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    I need to remember all this. In case Dubya ever requests an audience with me. :salute:


    By JULIE MASON
    Copyright 2005 Houston Chronicle Washington Bureau

    WASHINGTON - President Bush likes to wax populist by calling the White House "the people's house," but his rules of decorum aren't what you would find in most people's homes.

    Coming to office after the more casual Clinton administration, Bush imposed a strict dress code and standards of promptness for employees, visitors and even the rumpled press corps.

    Bush once famously needled Adam Entous of Reuters for entering the Oval Office with a loosened tie.

    "You look fine today, Adam. The tie," Bush told Entous, during a brief audience for reporters with the prime minister of the Netherlands.

    Bush, who rates sartorial lapses only slightly below pagers and cell phones going off during his speeches, was being sarcastic. He really didn't think the loose tie was fine.

    "It's not as bad as a beeper violation. But it's getting close," Bush said.

    Bush recently hosted South Korean President Roh Moo-hyn in the Oval Office, where he was visibly annoyed by the nonchalance of visiting South Korean newsmen.

    Members of the White House press corps understand that, as a rule, touching the furniture in the Oval Office is strictly forbidden. Even when Bush brings a group of journalists in for an informal chat, he does not invite them to sit.

    So it was with unconcealed consternation that Bush sat through a brief question and answer session with the South Korean president, while two sound engineers from the South Korean press corps sprawled on a couch to get a good position for the remarks.

    The generally loquacious Bush delivered his comments in short, abrupt sentences with a tone of impatience.

    So profound was his air of injury that at one point, Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice and Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld, standing against a wall, stepped forward to peer at the offending sound technicians.
     
  2. Stephanie
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    Stephanie Diamond Member Supporting Member

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    IS IT NOT PAST YOUR BEDTIME??????? :eek2: :crutch: :splat: :sleep: :sleep:
     
  3. 5stringJeff
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    5stringJeff Senior Member

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    It's a matter of decorum. It's the same reason Ronald Reagan always wore a suit jacket when in the Oval Office. He sees it as a place in which decorum should be followed.
     
  4. Mr. P
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    Mr. P Senior Member

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    Sure, make it a flop house instead of THE WHITE HOUSE...
    My guess is, if Bush went into a palace somewhere and didn't adhere to the
    customs or norms, say taking your shoes off maybe before he entered...you'd f'ing flip out about that...RIGHT?

    I don't have a problem with HIGH standards in The White House at all.
     
  5. Said1
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    Said1 VIP Member

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    I don't know about you, but I've worked in coporate settings, neat clean attire and appearence was essential.....or else! Not to mention cell phones and pagers were not permitted in board meetings.
     

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