What is business intelligence?

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by Lateralus, May 1, 2018.

  1. Lateralus
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    Lateralus BANNED

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    And how important is it for developing your own company?
     
  2. midcan5
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    midcan5 liberal / progressive

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    Rambling. An oxymoron maybe? Hard to say, remember Polaroid, Kodak, and lots of store names now forgotten. Or consider the impact of technology or our global work world. If you told me I'd be chatting with an Indian in India each morning, I'd think you crazy. I still remember mechanical systems. What did people do before cell phones I wonder. Then there is automation and fast food. Amazon came to life because our military leaders wanted a fault proof communication's system. Remember Bell Labs? How's that darn transistor thing work anyway? Business intelligence may just be luck and timing, nothing more.

    Skills for Business Intelligence Jobs

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    "Big Business, in America, is almost wholly devoid of anything even poetically describable as public spirit. It is frankly on the make, day in and day out, and hence for the sort of politician who gives it the best chance. In order to get that chance it is willing to make any conceivable sacrifice of common sense and the common decencies. Big Business was in favor of Prohibition, believing that a sober workman would make a better slave than the one with a few drinks in him. It was in favor of gross robberies and extortions that went on during the war, and profited by all of them. It was in favor of the crude throttling of free speech that was then undertaken in the name of patriotism, and is still in favor of it." H.L. Mencken

    "Not only does there seem to be widespread social fragmentation and disillusionment with democracy in the United States, but the possibility of reversing this sense of alienation appears to many of us to be already lost. Any democratic president who wants to institute the desperately needed reforms in health, welfare and the environment faces one of two options. He can stick by his reform program and suffer a loss of public confidence through orchestrated campaigns to publicly portray him as 'too liberal' and ineffectual (the Carter image) or too indecisive or sexually indiscreet (the Clinton image). Alternatively, a reforming democratic president can move further to the Right, forget his promises and become part of the propaganda campaign. Given the history of democratic propaganda in the United States, some of us doubt that another Roosevelt or New Deal is possible. The political system is now so attuned to business interests that this kind of reformer could no longer institute the substantial health, welfare, education, environmental and employment reforms the country needs." Andrew Lohrey, Introduction, Alex Carey "Taking the Risk Out of Democracy"
     
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