What do you call someone

Discussion in 'Religion and Ethics' started by jwoodie, Oct 23, 2018.

  1. jwoodie
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    jwoodie Gold Member Supporting Member

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    who believes that all religions are valid attempts to explain our existence? Can an "agnostic" believe in a greater intelligence without trying to define it?

    Your thoughts will be appreciated.
     
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  2. OldLady
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    OldLady Diamond Member

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    I think a whole lot of people believe that. Defining some things makes no sense. Especially
    Wouldn't that just be someone who doesn't believe in a particular organized religion? I don't know if it makes them an agnostic.
     
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  3. fncceo
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    fncceo Gold Member

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    I don't call people ...

    I text.

    [​IMG]
     
  4. Compost
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    Compost Gold Member

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    A blanket statement saying sure, why not? Every religion is valid in their attempts... It's a pretense of open mindedness but is actually just lazy thinking. Speaking of lazy thinking- that's how agnostics strike me. They are open to proofs but just can't quite commit to thinking it all through and forming an opinion.
     
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  5. Pogo
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    Pogo Diamond Member

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    Religion does not require "belief in a greater intelligence".
     
  6. BlackFlag
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    BlackFlag Gold Member

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    I believe in a greater something but not necessarily something intelligent or that is even aware or cares that we exist. I certainly don’t think its existence or non-existence has anything to do with what happens in the world.
     
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  7. Taz
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    Taz Gold Member

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    An agnostic, such as myself, doesn't think that a god has been proven but leaves the door open if someone ever comes up with real proof either way. But don't expect real proof at this site, believe me, nobody has any. :biggrin:
     
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  8. jwoodie
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    jwoodie Gold Member Supporting Member

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    What do you call people who can't respond to the question without hostility?
     
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  9. well named
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    well named poorly undertitled Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    You could refer to such a person as a religious pluralist, perhaps. Sometimes people use the word universalist to mean much the same thing.

    You might be interested in Huxley's Perennial Philosophy

    Also, one of my favorite religious authors was Catholic priest whose father was an Indian Hindu and mother a Spanish catholic. He was an academic interested in comparative religion and inter-religious dialogue, and quite a bit of his writing is concerned with various kinds of mysticism and apophatic theology, which fits with your idea of agnosticism, I think. All of his work is pretty interesting, but I recommend The Rhythm of Being especially. Panikkar also wrote an English translation of various Vedic texts, which I think is amazing, but enormous to try to get through. His writing about Buddhism is also good but hard to find in English.

    In the Christian tradition specifically, there are a lot of Byzantine authors from early Christianity who are interested in this idea of the unknowable-ness or indefinability of the Divine. As with a lot of ancient writing, they can be pretty obscure, but perhaps worth the time. Pseudo-Dionysius (~5th century) is paradigmatic, but see also works by Gregory of Nyssa (or Danielou's classic book about him), Maximus the Confessor, and others. Being Christian, they are less concerned with universalism in the sense you are talking about but I think it's interesting to see how different Byzantine theology often is from modern, western Christian theology. On that general topic, The Mystical Theology of the Eastern Church is very good.
     
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  10. Picaro
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    Picaro Gold Member

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    Angry Faggots and Deviants.
     

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