What are you reading now?

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by miketx, Jul 12, 2018.

  1. night_son
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    night_son Gold Member

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    Splitting my spare time between rereading Beowulf and The Gulag Archipelago.
     
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  2. idb
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    idb Gold Member

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    Shackleton's Captain tells the story of the rescue of his men.
    Absolutely epic.
     
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  3. fncceo
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    fncceo Gold Member

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    Currently reading ... "Rivers of London" by Ben Aaronovitch

    [​IMG]

    But if you're looking for literature of a nautical nature, I recommend

    The 'Horatio Hornblower' series by C.S. Forester
    'Sink the Bismark', also by C.S. Forester
    'Master and Commander' by Patrick O'Brien
     
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  4. miketx
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    miketx Diamond Member

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    I'm reading it now.
     
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  5. miketx
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    miketx Diamond Member

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    I notice the use of language between Dana and Shackleton is much more readable to me.
     
  6. HereWeGoAgain
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    HereWeGoAgain Diamond Member

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    Which one?
    The original or the modern english translation?
     
  7. miketx
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    miketx Diamond Member

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    I don't know, but the language is kind of hard to follow at times. Sorry for the delay, I didn't see you had posted.
     
  8. WheelieAddict
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    WheelieAddict Gold Member

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    I'm re-reading an ancient copy of Cosmos by Carl Sagan an uncle gave me like 20 years ago. Glad I saved it, it is outdated but still a good read. Puts things into perspective. I will probably keep it and give it a read again when I'm 60 lol.
     
  9. Rogo
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    Rogo Choose to choose

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    I'm currently reading The Three Ecologies (1989) by the psychotherapist and political radical, Félix Guattari.

    Many only know of Guattari's work through his collaboration with Gilles Deleuze, which is rather sad considering his solo work (like Machinic Unconscious, for example) is phenomenal.

    Anyway, the book I'm reading now is short, but rather thorough in its analysis of post-industrial capitalism and how it affects our relationship to the environment. I especially like the introduction, which makes an allusion to Professor Challenger. It works well with Guattari's desire to develop a "mental ecology" that breaks from the bourgeois dominative perspective towards nature.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2018
  10. cnm
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    cnm Diamond Member

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    Jungle Child by Norah Burke. The story of her life as the daughter of a forestry officer in the Raj around the turn of the century. Very interesting view of a world long gone and as good nature writing as Durrell.

    For sailing adventure I recommend The Cruise of the Cachalot by Frank Bullen, a young Limey sailor on board a Yankee whaler, free from Gutenberg. Better than Moby Dick. Cachalot is French for sperm whale, their common prey. At least as good as TYBtM and Robinson Crusoe. Less fiction too, I'd say.
     
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    Last edited: Oct 11, 2018

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