what about asian-americans?

Discussion in 'Race Relations/Racism' started by archigogo, Jan 14, 2012.

  1. archigogo
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    archigogo Rookie

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    do asian-americans have any power or saying in this country or is it only the whites and the blacks, or "other":confused::confused::confused:
     
  2. Meister
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    Meister Platinum Member Supporting Member

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    one person-one vote need I say more?
     
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  3. danigold
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    danigold danigold

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    Where would you even get the idea that asian americans dont have power? Of course they do.
     
  4. FuelRod
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    FuelRod Gold Member

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    Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders have a high level of political incorporation in terms of their actual voting population. However, as a result of this group's historically low voting rates, overall political incorporation of the general population is relatively low. The population of this group has increased in size by 600% in the last 30 years[when?] due to immigration. Despite high levels of naturalization and voter outreach efforts, this primarily foreign-born community with less than 1% of voters has 2% of congressional population. As 4.4% of the total population in the United States falls into this category, this 2% still represents less than half of the total Asian American and Pacific Islander population.

    There were eight members of Asian or Islander descent in the House and three in the Senate. Senator Daniel Inouye and Representatives Mike Honda, Doris Matsui, and Mazie Hirono are all Japanese Americans. Senator Daniel Akaka is a Native Hawaiian, Delegate Eni Faleomavaega is a Samoan, and Joseph Cao is a Vietnamese American. Bobby Scott of Virginia, who is also half African American, has Filipino American ancestry. Steve Austria of Ohio also claims Filipino American ethnicity. John Ensign of Nevada has claimed that he is 1/8 Filipino American, enlarging the number of those who claim to be Filipino American in Congress to the highest point since the Philippine Islands had been represented as a territory. Judy Chu became the first Chinese American woman in Congress when she won a special election in 2009. David Wu of Oregon is Taiwanese American.

    Members of the 111th United States Congress - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
     
  5. Silkcity19
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    Silkcity19 Active Member

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  6. Sunni Man
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    Sunni Man Diamond Member

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    Only when it comes to what's on the menu at "Happy Lotus" buffet down the street.

    Other than that............not so much :cool:
     
  7. Sallow
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    Sallow The Big Bad Wolf. Supporting Member

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    Where?
     
  8. CeciWang
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    CeciWang Rookie

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    I think Asian Americans are not as powerful as white and black is because many of them are only second generations of their family to immigrate to the states. And many of them are still too young to have a voice in the country. No offense but the first generation of immigrate usually cannot completely get themselves involved in the American society, so they are hard to speak out. Unlike whites or blacks, they have been here for a hundred years, their culture formed what U.S. is now. But asian culture is more considered as an exotic thing. It is just about time for the states to absorb a new culture into their established culture. So I think 10 or more years later, the Asian voice will be more powerful in the states. It is just about the time.
     
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  9. waltky
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    waltky Wise ol' monkey Supporting Member

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    Granny says, "Dat's right - in another generation or two dey ain't gonna be no white folks to run things...
    :eusa_eh:
    U.S. Census Bureau: Asians fastest growing ethnic group in the nation last year
    6/13/2013 > Asians continued to be the fastest-growing race or ethnic group in the nation in 2012 with their population rising 2.9 percent to 18.9 million while Hispanics grew by 2.2 percent to just over 53 million, according to new U.S. Census Bureau annual population estimates.
    See also:

    US whites falling to minority in under-5 age group
    June 13, 2013 WASHINGTON (AP) — In a first, America's racial and ethnic minorities now make up about half of the under-5 age group, reflecting sweeping changes by race and class among young people. Due to an aging population, non-Hispanic whites last year recorded more deaths than births.
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2013
  10. MaryL
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    MaryL Gold Member

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    I recently watched a video called "what kind of Asian are you" on YouTube. I also saw a commercial last week with a Asian man with a black woman. I have never seen that, ever in real life... Asians have suffered and they have persevered. They never seemed to need Caucasians or anyone’s else approval until the last few years. I think they can do just fine without, kids.
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2013

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