what a load of CEO crap

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by DKSuddeth, Jan 7, 2004.

  1. DKSuddeth
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    DKSuddeth Senior Member

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    http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=569&ncid=738&e=1&u=/nm/20040107/tc_nm/tech_ceos_dc

    NEW YORK (Reuters) - Top executives from technology companies, facing criticism for moving jobs to low-cost centers such as India and China, said on Wednesday that the United States needs to boost education and offer more tax breaks to compete in the global job market.

    Such heavy-hitters as Intel Chief Executive Officer Craig Barrett and Hewlett-Packard Chief Executive officer Carly Fiorina spoke on Wednesday at a Washington DC computer industry lobbying group roundtable with the media.


    The technology companies also issued a report to lay out policies to keep a strong tech job market in the United States.


    "America can only grow jobs and improve its competitiveness by choosing to compete globally, and that will require renewed focus on innovation, education and investment," said Barrett.


    The lobbying group, which also includes International Business Machines Corp. (NYSE:IBM - news) and Dell Inc. (Nasdaq:DELL - news), pushes for policymakers to support the industry by boosting high-speed Internet use and putting favorable trade policies in place, among other things.


    While the group's appeals were not much different than usual, it is now tying its message to the fate of the U.S. technology workforce, which is fearful of losing jobs to cheaper overseas labor.


    Jobs in computer services and customer call centers have been moved to countries such as India and China by most large tech companies, including IBM.


    "We can either choose to compete with the rising powers of China and India and other would-be economic leaders and take advantage of worldwide business opportunities or we could retreat," said Bruce Mehlman, executive director of the lobbying group, called the Computer Systems Policy Project.


    One analyst said that the group's message would not be lost in an election year, in which jobs moving overseas could become a hot-button issue.


    "Right now there are eight to 10 million technology-related votes out there, that's a pretty big portion of the populace," said Meta Group analyst Howard Rubin. "This is a block of voters that no one has been paying attention to."


    While their proposals are largely the same, adding the outsourcing of jobs overseas brings new attention to them, he said.


    "If around these policies they are proposing they've had an agenda, well yeah, this issue brings new light to that agenda. But it would be nice if people were to think about what the right thing to do is at this time," Rubin said.


    In the report released on Wednesday, the group said that the U.S. needs to set goals for the deployment of high-speed Internet technology, put in place a permanent research and development tax credit, and fund University-based research in the physical sciences, among other things.


    The report, called "Choose to Compete: How Innovation, Investment and Productivity Can Grow U.S. Jobs and Ensure American Competitiveness in the 21st Century," also calls for a change in the depreciation of technology assets, a permanent tax moratorium on Internet access and changes in international income tax rules.
     
  2. eric
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    eric Guest

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    Where is the load of crap you speak of ?
     
  3. wonderwench
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    wonderwench Guest

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    I was wondering precisely that.

    What is wrong with lowering taxes and improving education?

    Sounds good to me.
     
  4. DKSuddeth
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    DKSuddeth Senior Member

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    You know, as well as I do eric, that thousands of american IT workers currently unemployed are some of the best educated out there. 'Improving your competitiveness' simply means accept what I'm willing to pay you.

    so whats really being said is we should spend $20k plus for a college degree so we can make 35 to 40k a year.
     
  5. DKSuddeth
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    DKSuddeth Senior Member

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    companies already get exemptions from most local taxes just for building in an area because the local gov knows they will make it up in the tax base from the workers.

    Improving education? again, what should we do, go out and pay 80k for a double masters so we can answer a phone saying "thank you for calling compusa tech support, how can I help you today?"
     
  6. jon_forward
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    jon_forward Active Member

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    I watch a show on tv the other nite about this..high tech jobs going offshore....person here earns 80k, they get same job done in india for 8 to 10k. christallmighty, you get more than that here for bagging food up at the corner store. it all comes down to the bottom line....maybe we shouldnt do business with companys that are doing this....than you would have no puter,not alot to eat, naked and no fuel to heat the house or gas toput in car. I dont know what the answer to this is but someone in washington should be looking at this problem also maybe the folks that got displaced should be looking at themselves too. did they really have to make that much a year? I am no real smart fella just a auto mechanic...in my best year I made 35k gross and that was store manager...2 kids,wife and payments up the wazzu.but we lived just as good when I only made 18k working at a factory. where do you draw the line ???? its all good when you hit a homerun but that isnt what wins in the long game...singles do. I dont have to have designer clothes, a beemer in the driveway and 6 bedrooms/3 baths in the house. I call it excess. what do you need to live on???
     
  7. wonderwench
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    wonderwench Guest

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    That's not the reason why education is an issue.

    It's more about affordable housing than the quality of workers. In CA, for example, the poor quality of public schools has driven housing prices in the few good school districts through the roof. This then puts pressure on compensation, and drives up the cost of doing business.
     
  8. eric
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    eric Guest

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    People you have to get your facts straight, jon, I have to disagree with you on the issue of salary. Sure you can find people who work for 8 - 10 K a year, but for quality programmers the average has risen to about 25 K, and it is climbing all the time. You know I don't like this trend either, but being realistic, the American worker has brought much of this on himself. I have experience with hundreds of employees over the last couple of years and let me be quite honest, the work ethic is just not there for many people. They want to be paid more for less work and more benefits. Finding productive employees who take pride in their work is no easy task. More to come ...
     
  9. jon_forward
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    jon_forward Active Member

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    when I was in business I had the same problem with employees. wanted a paycheck but did not want to work. this problem is not so in the midwest. by and large if a person walked in to my place of business and was from the midwest I knew they knew what a days work was. but you are right, I think they get taught this way in school or be there parents. sad but true
     
  10. Moi
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    Moi Active Member

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    Improving competitiveness doesn't just mean accepting what someone is willing to pay. It's also about overall working scenarios. I bet the people in India don't demand higher wages, health care, mandatory sick/vacation days, holidays, 401k's, stock options, lunch hours, cafeterias, windowed offices, telecommuting, job sharing, maternity leave, etc. All these things that drive up the cost of doing business. When your employer is paying you that 35-40K what is the ultimate cost to the employer including all the taxes that employer is paying pluss all your benefits? It's at least 25% higher. Add that up across the board and that's a lot of money. How can you fault american companies for doing just what you are? Looking for the greater amount to put in your pocket.

    Furthermore the amortization of that college degree is less than $250 a month over 10 years at today's interest rates- a small price to pay when you can bring home $40,000 a year/$3333/mo. It comes out to pennies per day over your working lifetime.
     

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