Weeds are edible

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by bigrebnc1775, Mar 2, 2011.

  1. bigrebnc1775
    Offline

    bigrebnc1775 Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2010
    Messages:
    64,004
    Thanks Received:
    3,798
    Trophy Points:
    1,790
    Location:
    Kannapolis, N.C.
    Ratings:
    +4,830
    I hope you will find this very informative



    Crabgrass Was King




    Stone Age dwellers in Switzerland cultivated crabgrass and it was important food crop in China in 2700 B.C. It's a traditional food in India and Africa. It was first introduced into the U.S. in 1849 by the United States Patent Office as forage for cattle, sheep, hogs and horses. Then the Department of Agriculture was formed and it took over. Within 10 years crabgrass farming was abandoned. But then came immigrants from eastern Europe. Poles, Czechs, Slovaks, and Hungarians relied on the grain. They called it kasha/kasza and spread it around more but soon they learned corn and wheat could be grown just as easily and was worth more money than crabgrass grain if they wanted to sell it. The beginning of crabgrassÂ’ transition from valued food to hated weed was born.
    Crabgrass: Digitaria sanguinalis

    Other weeds are in this link
    Eat The Weeds
     
    • Thank You! Thank You! x 1
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 19, 2014
  2. Shadow
    Offline

    Shadow BANNED

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2008
    Messages:
    5,282
    Thanks Received:
    925
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Land Of Enchantment
    Ratings:
    +926
    How to Make an Edible Weed Salad


    Harvesting and growing weeds is easy. Many people do so without any effort at all. Instead of getting frustrated in the never-ending battle against weeds in your garden, take advantage of them. Many weeds are tasty and full of age-fighting antioxidants as well as essential vitamins and minerals. Some fresh weeds are delicious in a garden salad.



    How to Make an Edible Weed Salad | eHow.com
     
  3. JBeukema
    Offline

    JBeukema BANNED

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2009
    Messages:
    25,613
    Thanks Received:
    1,703
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    everywhere and nowhere
    Ratings:
    +1,705
    We have plants here with white milky stuff in the stems.

    If your dog eats them, it can die
     
  4. dilloduck
    Offline

    dilloduck Diamond Member

    Joined:
    May 8, 2004
    Messages:
    53,240
    Thanks Received:
    5,552
    Trophy Points:
    1,850
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    Ratings:
    +6,403
    Milkweed =====argggggg and you can't get that shit off your hands.
     
  5. Lumpy 1
    Offline

    Lumpy 1 Diamond Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2009
    Messages:
    33,131
    Thanks Received:
    8,539
    Trophy Points:
    1,370
    Ratings:
    +14,847
    Every spring we go out and collect what we call,"miners lettuce", heck, I like it..
     
  6. uscitizen
    Offline

    uscitizen Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 6, 2007
    Messages:
    45,941
    Thanks Received:
    4,791
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    My Shack
    Ratings:
    +4,807
    Consider that some think snails are good to eat. I would prefer crabgrass.
     
  7. Shadow
    Offline

    Shadow BANNED

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2008
    Messages:
    5,282
    Thanks Received:
    925
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Land Of Enchantment
    Ratings:
    +926
    One of the things that I remember about my dad...he loved Dandelion Greens. :)

    Sauteed Dandelion Greens

    Ingredients:


    3 pound dandelion greens, tough lower stems discarded and leaves cut crosswise into 2-inch pieces
    1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
    5 large garlic cloves, smashed
    1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon dried hot red-pepper flakes
    1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt


    Directions:


    Cook greens in a 10-to 12-quart pot of boiling salted water (3 tablespoons salt for 8 quarts water), uncovered, until ribs are tender, about 10 minutes. Drain in a colander, then rinse under cold water to stop cooking and drain well, gently pressing out excess water.

    Heat oil in a 12-inch heavy skillet over medium heat until it shimmers, then cook garlic and red-pepper flakes, stirring, until pale golden, about 45 seconds. Increase heat to medium-high, then add greens and sea salt and sauté until coated with oil and heated through, about 4 minutes.
     
    • Thank You! Thank You! x 1

Share This Page