War Games: Guarding Pakistan's Nukes

Discussion in 'Military' started by onedomino, Dec 28, 2007.

  1. onedomino
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    onedomino SCE to AUX

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    In a rash of news articles around mid November it was revealed that America has spent about $100 million in an effort to get the Pakis to better guard their nuclear weapons. It is reported that they possess between 50 and 150 devices. http://www.nytimes.com/2007/11/18/washington/18nuke.html?hp. Certainly it is prudent to help Pakistan be absolutely sure that the nukes are safe. Despite public pronouncements to the contrary, the Pentagon is less than sanguine about the security of Paki nuclear weapons. http://www.guardian.co.uk/pakistan/Story/0,,2220126,00.html. In fact, the architect of the US troop surge in Iraq, Fred Kagan, apparently called the White House to have it consider a wide range of negative scenarios in Pakistan. And this was around the beginning of December well before the turmoil caused by the recent Bhutto assassination. Of course considering all possible future demands on the US military is only prudent, and it is what guys like Kagan get paid to do. While I do not think some of the Kagan scenarios are likely, it gives one great pause to consider our challenges if the following were to occur simultaneously:

    - The need to seize Pakistan's nukes: imagine trying to war game that, much less actually attempting to do it.
    - The need to rush thousands of US troops into the tribal areas of western Pakistan to fight the terrorists hiding there.
    - The need to militarily help occupy Islamabad and the provinces of Punjab, Sindh and Baluchistan if requested by a "fractured Pakistan army."

    Kagan has argued that the rise of Sunni Islamic extremism in Pakistan, coupled with Paki army infiltration, and terrorists from the western provinces, might be enough to seize power. Extremists cannot be allowed to possess nuclear weapons. Clearly, if that were about to unfold, America would have to try to stop it...but could we?

    Is Pakistan very far away from an Islamic extremist coup? How much has the Paki army been infiltrated? We never thought it would happen in Iran, but of course it did.

     
  2. JimH52
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    JimH52 Gold Member

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    This is as frightening as it gets. Screw Iran, Pakistan should be our biggest worry.
     
  3. onedomino
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    onedomino SCE to AUX

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    Pakistan is the most dangerous country on Earth. What happens when you mix an unreliable military with Islamic extremism, uncontrolled rebel territory, political chaos, and nuclear weapons?
     
  4. onedomino
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    onedomino SCE to AUX

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  5. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    Well it's not 'covert' anymore. Did you see this? *Satire Alert*

    http://www.scrappleface.com/?p=2844

    This is more scary:

    http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/world/middle_east/article3137695.ece


     
  6. onedomino
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    onedomino SCE to AUX

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    At what point does revealing military and/or nuclear secrets become treason? Individuals convicted of such activity should receive the maximum punishment specified by law. The Rosenbergs were executed. Regarding the article above, would the individual who passed US nuclear secrets to Turkey, and on to Pakistan, be subject to such a sentence? I thought that the US Navy guy, John Walker, who passed our communications codes to the Soviets should have received the death penalty. Had we gone to war with the Soviets with compromised communications codes, Walker would have been responsible for thousands of American deaths, and perhaps US naval defeat.
     
  7. onedomino
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    onedomino SCE to AUX

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    It seems that we can keep nothing secret. They might as well broadcast NSC meetings live on the radio.
     
  8. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    It almost seems like it's purposeful. :rolleyes:

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/7172440.stm

     
  9. onedomino
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    onedomino SCE to AUX

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    Sweden...why doesn't that level of punishment for something so serious surprise us? Losing classified data in Sweden carries the same potential punishment as possession as 2 oz. of pot in Texas. Whoever wrote that law in Sweden had just smoked 2 oz. of pot.
     
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  10. onedomino
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    onedomino SCE to AUX

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