Wall Street Journal--Newt Gingrich could be the GOP nominee

Discussion in 'Politics' started by oreo, Nov 10, 2011.

  1. oreo
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    oreo Gold Member Supporting Member

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    Wall Street Journal: Newt Gingrich Can Win GOP Nomination | Mediaite

    It looks like Newt Gingrich is coming on real strong here. My opinion--I think he moves into second place--behind Romney fairly quickly--with Herman Cain's problems with the recent sexual harassment accusations.
     
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  2. Claudette
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    Claudette Gold Member

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    I like Newt.

    His baggage doesn't bother me on iota.

    The GOP could do a hell of a lot worse than Newt getting the nomination.

    I would dearly love to see Barry and Newt in a debate.

    My moneys on Newt.
     
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  3. Truthmatters
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    Newt is for reregulating the banking industry while he fought to deregulate it in the 90s.

    His leadership helped cause this problem and now he is flip flopping
     
  4. PredFan
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    PredFan Gold Member

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    Newt would crush Obozo in a debate. I could live with Newt as our nom.
     
  5. WillowTree
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    WillowTree Diamond Member

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    No one gives a flying phuck about your lies.. Zero Zip Nada..
     
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    The other thing that helped is the Democrats, especially Barney Frank, stonewalling every attempt by Bush to regulate or at least audit Fanny Mae and Freddy Mac. Now the Democrats are flip-flopping. So what? Live and learn.
     
  7. Truthmatters
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    Did Newt back Gram leach bliley?

    does he now say that was a mistake?
     
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    The republicans had the majority and could have steamrolled over Franks
     
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    ^^^ what Claudette said.
     
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    Gramm


    Legislative history





    Final Congressional vote by chamber and party, November 4, 1999
    The banking industry had been seeking the repeal of the 1933 Glass–Steagall Act since the 1980s, if not earlier. In 1987 the Congressional Research Service prepared a report that explored the cases for and against preserving the Glass–Steagall act.[3]

    Respective versions of the legislation were introduced in the U.S. Senate by Phil Gramm (Republican of Texas) and in the U.S. House of Representatives by Jim Leach (R-Iowa). The third lawmaker associated with the bill was Rep. Thomas J. Bliley, Jr. (R-Virginia), Chairman of the House Commerce Committee from 1995 to 2001.

    During debate in the House of Representatives, Rep. John Dingell (D-Michigan) argued that the bill would result in banks becoming "too big to fail." Dingell further argued that this would necessarily result in a bailout by the Federal Government.[4]

    The House passed its version of the Financial Services Act of 1999 on 1 July 1999 by a bipartisan vote of 343-86 (Republicans 205–16; Democrats 138–69; Independent 0–1),[5][6][note 1] two months after the Senate had already passed its version of the bill on May 6 by a much-narrower 54–44 vote along basically-partisan lines (53 Republicans and one Democrat in favor; 44 Democrats opposed).[8][9][10][note 2]

    When the two chambers could not agree on a joint version of the bill, the House voted on July 30 by a vote of 241-132 (R 58-131; D 182-1; Ind. 1–0) to instruct its negotiators to work for a law which ensured that consumers enjoyed medical and financial privacy as well as "robust competition and equal and non-discriminatory access to financial services and economic opportunities in their communities" (i.e., protection against exclusionary redlining).[note 3]

    The bill then moved to a joint conference committee to work out the differences between the Senate and House versions. Democrats agreed to support the bill after Republicans agreed to strengthen provisions of the anti-redlining Community Reinvestment Act and address certain privacy concerns; the conference committee then finished its work by the beginning of November.[9][12] On November 4, the final bill resolving the differences was passed by the Senate 90-8,[13][note 4] and by the House 362-57.[14][note 5] The legislation was signed into law by President Bill Clinton on November 12, 1999.[15]
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2011

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