volcanic activity detected........in Antarctica?

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by DKSuddeth, Jun 28, 2004.

  1. DKSuddeth
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    DKSuddeth Senior Member

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    news link

    Software on a NASA spacecraft recently made a scientific observation on its own without human interaction. The Space Technology 6 Autonomous Sciencecraft Experiment captured images of Antarctica's Mount Erebus and detected volcanic activity.
     
  2. dilloduck
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    dilloduck Diamond Member

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    I think that's cool----are we talking smoke and tremors ? I'll have to look for it on another site.
     
  3. fuzzykitten99
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    fuzzykitten99 Senior Member

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    well, at least we can stop hearing about the so-called global warming embellishment. It was probably this thing the whole time, if it is true.
     
  4. DKSuddeth
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    DKSuddeth Senior Member

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    well, that wouldn't explain the northern polar regions though.
     
  5. HGROKIT
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    HGROKIT Active Member

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    Why not? Wouldn't it be a logical assumption that if there could be acticity in the south there could also be in the north?
     
  6. DKSuddeth
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    DKSuddeth Senior Member

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    there is, the ring of fire near alaska as well as Iceland, but these two occurrences have been in existence for decades.
     
  7. brneyedgrl80
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    brneyedgrl80 Member

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    I remember reading in one of my Discover magazines a couple of years ago that there are volcanoes all over the place under water and even under tetonic plates. I always that it was pretty interesting.
     
  8. dmp
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    dmp Senior Member

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    Djoo guys know the largest desert on the planet is Antarctica?

    It's true. :)
     
  9. insein
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    insein Senior Member

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    I think its arrogant to assume that humans have destroyed an ozone that has existed for hundreds of millions of years in less than a millenia. The Earth changes on its own terms.
     
  10. fuzzykitten99
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    fuzzykitten99 Senior Member

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    i totally agree. The earth went through several phases, and there is no proof that the phase we are in is permanent. Can any of you liberals tell me why if global warming is such a problem, why we can't seem to get past 70F here in MN? Last summer, and in all of my years (except 1) we have averages of 80-90 by now. It is almost f-ing July and until today, nothing past 65, other than a few random days.

    ****i got this from a local site****
    http://www.climate.umn.edu/doc/journal/cool0406.htm

    Minnesota has often been positioned on the cold side of stationary fronts over the past two months. The preponderance of stationary fronts dissecting Minnesota explains the very wet regime. The exception to this has been in north central and parts of northeast Minnesota, where precipitation has been at or below normal.

    Another feature of this weather pattern is the persistent coolness. The magnitude of the cool weather is much larger across the northern third of Minnesota. For instance, in International Falls the warmest temperature as of June 20 has been 82 degrees. The number of days below normal there for May through June 20 was 43 out of 51 days. May was the third coldest on record and as of June 20 International Falls is running 3.3 degrees below normal. If the cool pattern continues for the rest of June, the May plus June average temperature would equal 51.4 degrees (tying 1947 and 1969 for the coldest May through June average in the 70 years of available International Falls data.

    Over southern Minnesota including the Twin Cities, the cold hasn't been as intense. May in the Twin Cities finished 2.7 degrees below normal and June so far is about a degree and a half below normal. One striking feature is the lack of days reaching 80 degrees or above. From April 1 through June 20 there should be on average 16 days of 80 degrees or higher in the Twin Cities. So far there are only 9. However, the mercury reached 90 degrees or higher in the Twin Cities through June 20. Last year through the end of June there wasn't a single day of 90 or above. There were 14 days of 90 or above in July through September last year so warm weather fans take heart. There is still plenty of summer left for a good old-fashioned heat wave.
     

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