Visited the doctor about my pheets...

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by dmp, Jan 6, 2005.

  1. dmp
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    dmp Senior Member

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    I went to the doctor last night, because the pain in the bottoms of my
    feet grew beyond my ability to deal with. While I was in the army, I
    was diagnosed with Plantar Fasciitis - a swelling/hurting/damaging of
    the Plantar fascia - a tendon which runs along the bottoms of our
    feet.

    The doctor did an ultrasound of my feet, telling me the normal width
    of the tendon is 2-3mm. When he did my left foot he got a very
    'shocked' look on his face.

    "wow. Thats..yeah...geesh..I've got you at 7mm. That's pretty
    inflamed."

    "At the risk of setting myself up to see something different, do you
    get pain in one foot more than the other?"

    'they both hurt, but my right foot seems unbearable at times...'

    He measures, via the ultrasound....

    "Holy - wow. Geesh..yeah, I'd say...cuz that's..heh..hold on a
    sec...yeah...that one...I don't often...I've got you at 10mm there.
    Ouch, eh? Most of the time I see ppl with this issue, they have about 4 or 5mm tendons...but a solid 7 - and a 10? Yeah...we need to get you fixed. How long as this been going on, because I notice some calcification of the bone as well"

    'Started back in about 2000...just as I was getting ready to get out of the army...but lately...the pain has gotten bad. What drives me to visit you was the thought, "I can't remember the last time my feet didn't absolutely hurt"', I replied.

    So, he outlined several months of physical therapy, and I'll likely
    have to wear special inserts in my shoes for the rest of my life. :-/

    But he thinks I could be pain free - or nearly pain free w/o surgery,
    and over the course of 4 or 5 months...however, if i stop wearing the orthotics, there's a likelihood the pain will come back over time. :(

    Still - beats dealing with what i've got now. :)
     
  2. no1tovote4
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    no1tovote4 VIP Member

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    Well, here's hoping that it will work.

    :beer:
     
  3. UsaPride
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    UsaPride Senior Member

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    That's great news, D! Good luck and hope it works!
     
  4. Johnney
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    Johnney Senior Member

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    surgery is bad! stay away from the knife :shocked:
     
  5. rtwngAvngr
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    rtwngAvngr Guest

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    What caused it?
     
  6. rtwngAvngr
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    rtwngAvngr Guest

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    Excuse me. I said, "What caused it?", bitch!
     
  7. dmp
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    dmp Senior Member

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    Most cases of plantar fasciitis are the result of a biomechanical fault that causes abnormal pronation. For example, a patient with a flexible rearfoot varus may at first appear to have a normal foot structure but, on weight-bearing, may display significant pronation. The talus will plantar flex and adduct as the patient stands, while the calcaneus everts. This pronation significantly increases tension on the plantar fascia.

    Other conditions, such as tibia vara, ankle equinus, rearfoot varus, forefoot varus, compensated forefoot valgus and limb length inequality, can cause an abnormal pronatory force. Increased pronation with a collapse produces additional stress on the anatomic central band of the plantar fascia and may ultimately lead to plantar fasciitis.2,3 This is understandable since the weakest point of the plantar fascia is its origin, not its substance (because of the high tensile strength of the fascial fibers themselves), Bitch! :D
     
  8. rtwngAvngr
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    rtwngAvngr Guest

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    LOL. So it's a birth defect! :thup:
     
  9. Johnney
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    Johnney Senior Member

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    D does it hurt when your not doing nothing? i ask cause after i fell 2 stories working for dish network ive noticed when i sit still for about 15 minutes or so and then i try to move, my achillies (SP?) hurts like hell. like hold on to somthing so i can move hurt.
     
  10. 5stringJeff
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    5stringJeff Senior Member

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    Ahem...

    :link:

    :link:

    :link:
     

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