US Energy Policy: Moving from Middle East OIL to Chinese turbines and batteries

Discussion in 'Economy' started by rdean, Nov 15, 2010.

  1. rdean
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    rdean rddean

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    On Morning Joe, the Author of “Hot, Flat and Crowded” was on talking about US Energy Policy. He slammed congress for voting against a forward thinking Energy Policy.

    The Senator from Florida said we need to build Nuclear Power Plants. The Author agreed, only he said it takes 8 to 10 years for one to come on line at a cost of 10 billion dollars minimum, each, not including the cost of the scientists and engineers needed. Most of ours are retiring.

    So, what are we going to do? As oil runs out, the cost runs up. Then we move to hybrids and batteries built in China.

    One of the things he pointed out was that in the past, business invested here to grow the business and grow the consumer sector. Now, they only want to make a profit and we can’t compete with Chinese labor.

    So, what’s the plan?

    Hot, Flat and Crowded by Thomas L Friedman

    http://www.etmsolar.com/gsuu/gs/friedman/synopsis.pdf

    Daily Top Ten List: Book Summary of Hot, Flat and Crowded
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2010
  2. loosecannon
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    loosecannon Senior Member

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    I don't think we can count on hybrid batteries made in China. These are made from exotic and rare earth minerals.

    What's plan D?
     
  3. rdean
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    rdean rddean

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    China will charge an arm and a leg.

    ----------------------------

    most of the world’s supply of REE comes from only a handful of sources. The highest concentrations are in Inner Mongolia (China), Mountain pass (California), and Mount Weld (Australia).

    operations at Mountain Pass were shut down in 2002

    Energy Policy Information Center (EPIC) EPIC Archive Energy, Security and Rare Earths

    On September 2009, China announced plans to reduce its export quota to 35,258 tons per year for 2010 to 2015, which is about 40 percent less than the 50,145 tons exported in 2009. Also, in July 2010 China’s Ministry of Commerce raised the possibility of an additional 72 percent cut in export quotas for the second half of the year.
     
  4. uscitizen
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    uscitizen Senior Member

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    sure we can China is happy to sell us reare earth materials in finished products.
    they will just not sell us the raw or processed rare earth metal materials.

    Same thing we would do.
    Too bad we outsourced all of ours to China...
     
  5. uscitizen
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    uscitizen Senior Member

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    Keep em straight Dean.
     
  6. loosecannon
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    loosecannon Senior Member

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    They would be happy to today, but we are already seeing the beginnings of a world wide shortage right as the world is beginning to significantly ramp up their use.

    Until batteries are designed that work and still don't rely on rare earth metals I think we would be wise not to base an energy platform on that prospect. The Earth's auto fleet is gonna require a shit load of battery mass. 500lbs/auto, with 600,000,000 autos already in use and Asia just entering the auto age in mass. That's a lotta heavy metals.
     

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