Upgraded my reloading set-up

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by Ninja, Jan 17, 2008.

  1. Ninja
    Offline

    Ninja Senior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2006
    Messages:
    2,220
    Thanks Received:
    377
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Glorious People's Republic of California
    Ratings:
    +377
    Got sick of the Lee Imprecision, Inc. Load-Master and decided to buy a Dillon XL 650.

    Bought the press plus a couple accoutrements (including 1000 .223 55gr FMJBTs) for $600, will post pics of the new rig once it's all set up.

    Gonna keep a the Lee turret press around for calibers that that don't get shot a whole lot (.50AE, etc.)

    There're a few more accessories I'd like to add in the future (low powder alarm and case feeder being at the top of the list) but for now I think I'm good to go.

    Any other reloaders? What're you using? Which calibers?
     
    • Thank You! Thank You! x 1
  2. Semper Fi
    Offline

    Semper Fi VIP Member

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2003
    Messages:
    1,772
    Thanks Received:
    130
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    Ratings:
    +130
    What the hell does that even mean? :eusa_think:
     
  3. RetiredGySgt
    Offline

    RetiredGySgt Platinum Member

    Joined:
    May 6, 2007
    Messages:
    39,569
    Thanks Received:
    5,902
    Trophy Points:
    1,140
    Location:
    North Carolina
    Ratings:
    +8,987
    He reloads his ammo. He bought a new press that does most of the work for him. Now he needs to buy more accessories, every caliber has its own tools and are bought seperately.

    His old press he will keep since he has a lot of the caliber tools he needs.

    Things you can get include resizing tools , cutter tools, designed to help work on shell casings, the more they are used the more out of shape they can become. Real good ones can be reused several times but may need some work.

    The press usually sits the primer and the bullet for you and crimps the bullet into place. Some have auto equipment for loading the powder as well. They can check the shell casing for basic suitability for use as well with the right equipment.
     
    • Thank You! Thank You! x 1
  4. RetiredGySgt
    Offline

    RetiredGySgt Platinum Member

    Joined:
    May 6, 2007
    Messages:
    39,569
    Thanks Received:
    5,902
    Trophy Points:
    1,140
    Location:
    North Carolina
    Ratings:
    +8,987
    Long ago I reloaded. I am much to lazy now. I just keep thousands of rounds available for my weapons now ) In a fire fight I doubt I will have time to collect my brass for reloading anyway.
     
  5. Ninja
    Offline

    Ninja Senior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2006
    Messages:
    2,220
    Thanks Received:
    377
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Glorious People's Republic of California
    Ratings:
    +377
    Busted out ~50 .223s until the powder measure started acting screwy... The first "Lee-like" moment :eusa_doh: ... Gonna have to work this out tomorrow, but other than that I'm very impressed with the Dillon craftsmanship. Indexing is so smooth with this baby.
     
  6. Helios
    Offline

    Helios Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2008
    Messages:
    334
    Thanks Received:
    21
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Ratings:
    +21
    I'm lost.. you guys collect canons? Like old canons or new canons?
     
  7. RetiredGySgt
    Offline

    RetiredGySgt Platinum Member

    Joined:
    May 6, 2007
    Messages:
    39,569
    Thanks Received:
    5,902
    Trophy Points:
    1,140
    Location:
    North Carolina
    Ratings:
    +8,987
    Regular weapons, any center fire round that has a metal casing can be reloaded.

    The process requires powder, primer, shell casing and of course the bullet. The reloader can be as simple as a small vise like device or a large machine that pours powder, measures shell casings and crimp settings and I believe some can even accomadate more than one tool set at a time.

    The only sort of dangerous part is seating the primer. And of course storing the gum powder.
     
  8. Helios
    Offline

    Helios Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2008
    Messages:
    334
    Thanks Received:
    21
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Ratings:
    +21
    Fascinating. So you actually work on the guns by hand? Pretty impressive, I gotta say. I know how to point and shoot, but I don't know anything about working on guns.
     
  9. RetiredGySgt
    Offline

    RetiredGySgt Platinum Member

    Joined:
    May 6, 2007
    Messages:
    39,569
    Thanks Received:
    5,902
    Trophy Points:
    1,140
    Location:
    North Carolina
    Ratings:
    +8,987
    No, not working on weapons, that would be a gunsmith, which is possible, not even sure one needs a license for that as long as they are not selling services.

    We are talking about the ammunition. Reloading ammunition.

    However simple take down and inspection of and even replacement of parts of most handguns and rifles or shotguns is pretty straight forward. What you would need training in is if you were going to do more than simple parts replacement.
     
  10. Helios
    Offline

    Helios Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2008
    Messages:
    334
    Thanks Received:
    21
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Ratings:
    +21
    I would think bullet casings are way too tattered and bent after firing, how do you reshape the casing to guarantee a working bullet?
     

Share This Page