Up to date co2 updates for each week

Discussion in 'Environment' started by Matthew, Jan 16, 2011.

?

What be the means for 2011 co2?

  1. Above 391

    2 vote(s)
    100.0%
  2. Below 391

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  1. Matthew
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    Matthew Blue dog all the way!

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    There is a weekly co2, which we have 4 times a month. For the first week of January 2011 we are at 391.65 ppm.

    January
    year--start-end
    2010 388.02 to 389.58
    2009 386.36 to 387.49
    2008 384.37 to 386.59
    ftp://ftp.cmdl.noaa.gov/ccg/co2/trends/co2_weekly_mlo.txt

    The new data for the 2nd week should be out within the next few days...


    This thread is to discuse the data and to watch the co2 rise.:tongue: Not a thread to be discussing rather it has any effect on climate or historic co2.
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2011
  2. Matthew
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    Matthew Blue dog all the way!

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    2011 1 2 2011.0027 391.78 Increased by .13 ppm
    2011 1 9 2011.0219 390.84

    Wow,

    Anyways the first week of January has been bumped up from 391.65 to 391.78, but our second week goes down to 390.84 ppm. That is 2.6 ppm above this week in 2010.

    So for the first half of January 2011 avges 391.31 ppm. I expect the third week to be above 391. If we don't get back to 391.78 ppm by the 4th week this January may be the first one within the 10 years I studied that didn't have a raise throughout the month. This going back to 2000. The avg is .5 to 1.25 ppm increases throughout January from the 1st to the 4th week.
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2011
  3. skookerasbil
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    skookerasbil Gold Member

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    s0n...........nobody fcuking cares. You need a beer and a plan.
     
  4. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    Kooky, as usual, you are irrelevant to the conversation.
     
  5. Matthew
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    Matthew Blue dog all the way!

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    January 2005 ends up at 378.43
    January 2006 ends up at 381.36, which is 2.93 over 2005
    January 2007 ends up at 382.88, which is 1.52 over 2006
    January 2008 end up at 385.42, which is 2.54 over 2007
    January 2009 ended up at 386.92, which is 1.5 ppm over 2008
    last January(2010) ended up at 388.45, which is 1.53 over 2009

    Avg increase between 2005-2010 for January 2.04/year...

    So far this January
    2011 1 2 2011.0027 391.63
    2011 1 9 2011.0219 390.73
    2011 1 16 2011.0411 390.76

    Avg 391.04 ppm, which if trend stays the same->391.04-388.45=2.59 increase. But more likely to be within 390.84(2.39) and 391.24 ppm(2.79) for this January. Respectable increase either way over last January.

    Some January don't have huge increases in within nina years->We see about 2/3rds the increase in co2 over the last because of the cooler oceans.

    My predictions for 2011---Max weekly anomaly 395.3 ppm...avg at the end of the year 391.2-391.6 ppm. 2008 had 1.6 increase so, 1.6+389.78=391.38. Using that data point to find what this year might do.
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2011
  6. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    And we also have the CH4 increasing rapidly, as well as some rather potent industrial GHGs. In reality, we have already exceeded the 450 ppm 'limit'.
     
  7. Mini 14
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    Mini 14 Senior Member

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    LGN, NOH, and NOP are down, even though (according to your numbers) CO2 has risen slightly.

    How do you account for that?
     
  8. Matthew
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    Matthew Blue dog all the way!

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    Any new info on ch4?
     
  9. Matthew
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  10. Old Rocks
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    Usually the University of Alaska publishes their results for the Arctic Ocean investigations in March.

    Methane release ‘looks stronger’ seeping from the Arctic seabed.

    The findings come from measurements of carbon fluxes around the north of Russia, led by Igor Semiletov from the University of Alaska at Fairbanks.

    “Methane release from the East Siberian Shelf is underway and it looks stronger than it was supposed [to be],” he said.

    Professor Semiletov has been studying methane seepage in the region for the last few decades, and leads the International Siberian Shelf Study (ISSS), which has launched multiple expeditions to the Arctic Ocean.

    The preliminary findings of ISSS 2009 are now being prepared for publication, he told BBC News.

    Methane seepage recorded last summer was already the highest ever measured in the Arctic Ocean.

    High seepage

    Acting as a giant frozen depository of carbon such as CO2 and methane (often stored as compacted solid gas hydrates), Siberia’s shallow shelf areas are increasingly subjected to warming and are now giving up greater amounts of methane to the sea and to the atmosphere than recorded in the past.

    This undersea permafrost was until recently considered to be stable.
     

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