Universities and colleges, how would the right make them less "liberal"?

Discussion in 'Education' started by rdean, May 20, 2011.

  1. rdean
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    rdean rddean

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    Quote from USMB Member:

    "Because academia is overwhelmingly left. Thats to include college students. It just goes to show ya that when people begin to take responsibility for their own lives and get out of that academic atmosphere they wise up."

    This is actually a very common comment from the Right on the USMB regarding "higher education". What is it saying about "education"? How would conservatives change that perspective, if it needed to be changed at all?

    Look at a few of the more popular areas. Science. How would the right change the way "science" is taught to make it more "conservative" and still have it be called "science"?

    Economics and "Trickle Down". When economics is taught, it's based on statistics, data and research. If the data shows something different than what conservatives want taught, should they ignore the data? Should conservative "notions" follow the same rigorous standard"?

    What about history? What would be taught "differently"?

    Psychology? Should it be taught that being "gay" is a "mental illness"? What would be the "cure"?

    Would there be a course on "Physical Evidence Proving God's Existence"?

    Would there be "morning prayer"?

    I'm simply curious. How would the right change colleges and universities to make them more "acceptable"?
     
  2. Anachronism
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    Let me start with this, rdean.... It is largely the educational SYSTEM that has created this left-leaning collegiate atmosphere. That is where I believe the changes need to begin.

    First I would force all students to declare a Major when applying for acceptance to the school. Get rid of all the "liberal arts" crap that so many students spend the first several years of their college experience wasting their time on. College should be about getting the education necessary for a CAREER. It should not be a career unto itself.

    Secondly, I would remove many of the unnecessary "humanities" and "liberal arts" classes from the curriculum of most degree programs. The college I attended (Johnson & Wales University in Providence, RI - A of S in Computer Aided Drafting - Class of 1994) did exactly that and it was wonderful so far as I was concerned. By removing the unnecessary garbage and focusing the curriculum on the English, Math, and Sciences pertinent to my career field and goals it made the educational experience much more enjoyable and worthwhile. Of course there were two elective classes over that two year span included in the curriculum and I could have paid extra for other courses if I'd wanted to take them.

    Institute an attendance policy. Again, this goes back to my days at J&W. We had 11 week "trimesters". Each class met at least twice a week, and you were allowed TWO absences from each class in an 11 week period. Once you had the third one you lost credit for the course. Lectures with an attached Lab gave you an additional two absences. It really forced those people who didn't want to do the work to not be there.

    Force all Freshmen students to live on-campus, in a dorm for the entire year. This would force them to learn to deal with other people who they don't necessarily like in close spaces. That's a skill/talent way too few people in the working world today seem to have.

    Base all application acceptance on standards. No affirmative action. No legacies. Either you can do the work or you can't. Those who get accepted and either can't or won't do the work should quickly get removed so those who can and will get their opportunity.

    Outlaw all "Greek" Societies. The frat/sorority system does nothing to improve college life. In fact it's a major detriment to the college experience of anyone who is there to actually get an education.

    Remove all inter-collegiate sports beyond the "club" level. No scholarships for athletics.

    Overall, I'd suggest that the way to "de-Liberalize" colleges and universities is to force them to operate more like a business and less like a four year orgy and free-for-all. Make the students actually WORK rather than allowing it to be a party atmosphere.

    That would at least be a good start.
     
  3. rdean
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    rdean rddean

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    I believe in dedication as much as the next guy, but you may be a tad "harsh". You used the word "force" 5 times. Remember, those people are paying to go to that college. College isn't like high school. You have a choice of whether or not to go.
    My feeling is that college isn't just about academics, but also "team building" and "getting along". I work in an engineering department and there is a very strong feelings of being "team players". We even had T-shirts made up for the department. Some of those "Liberal Classes" teach just that.
    I'm glad that a harsh environment worked so well for you, but are you really looking at the "big picture"?

    Looking forward to other right wing comments. I have to admit, this one was an "eye opener".
     
  4. Anachronism
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    I was taught growing up that the end of your Senior Year in High School was the end of your "fun time" in life. After that life was intended to become more serious, and while not necessarily totally devoid of enjoyment, that your life was supposed to come first. College, as I was taught, is your JOB for 2-4 years after high school if you choose to continue your education. If not, then the option isn't bumming around Europe, it's getting a real job and beginning to provide for yourself.

    My hometown.... Middletown, CT is the home of one of the more well known pseudo-Ivy League Liberal Arts schools in the US.... Wesleyan University. We joked in my youth that for $42K a year at the end of 4 years they taught you the secret words for your career just before graduation.... "Would you like fries with that, Sir?" Wesleyan was named Playboy's top Party School at least twice in my youth. Growing up around that sort of environment I quickly learned what college SHOULD NOT BE.

    I also work in an engineering department. In fact I've worked in three different ones (structural engineering, architecture, and now electric utility) over the 16 years of my career. I see a lot of college grad Engineers with $200K educations that I wouldn't hire to dig a ditch for me because they have no idea of how the real world works. They spent 4-5 years partying and trying to get into the pants of the sorority girls while doing less work towards their degree than they should have. Then I (the CAD guy with a 2 year, $34K total degree) have to actually teach them how to do their jobs because they don't have the common sense or basic engineering skills God gave a beaver. Yet they've got a pretty little degree on the wall saying they get to make $20K a year more than I do.

    Being a "team player" is something you should know how to do long before you GET to college, nevermind graduate from it. I hear this arguement that college is supposed to be about "learning who you are", "experimenting", "expanding your horizons", etc.... BULLSHIT. At $40K or more a year, that's an absolute JOKE. How many of these kids come out of college, having spent $100K+ of mom & dad's money and have no sense of where they're going, what their career will be, or any real-life skills to further their goals (if they even have any). That's an absolute waste of time and money.

    Oh, in what way was my commentary all that shocking and unexpected?
     
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  5. editec
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    editec Mr. Forgot-it-All

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    They're long term players and are succeeding in making them more acceptable.

    Study the history of Boston University and you'll see exactly how it's being done.
     
  6. editec
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    editec Mr. Forgot-it-All

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    1. So all arts and humanities courses are a waste of time?

    2. Oh, I see. You think all meaningful education is basically industrial arts education.

    Well, given that you believe that FEUDALISM is the best structure of society, I suppose that makes sense.

    Tell me Anachromism, what class would you be in, in your ideal society?
     
  7. Intense
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    By teaching Perceived Fact as Perceived Fact, Perceived Truth as Perceived Truth, Perceived Ideal, Value, Perspective, Ideology, at face value, nothing more, nothing less. Remove the spin, present what is known and when relevant, allow for independent thought, discussion, and conclusion. Should the goal be indoctrination or growth. If we find ourselves on a blind path in need of Guides, why blind them before preparing them for what is to come? Why limit them in that way? Why should our stumbling blocks be theirs?
     
  8. Wry Catcher
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    I suppose Liberty University and Regent Law School (remember Monica Goodling) are examples which reflect the views of social conservatives, as well as Bob Jones University pre 2000.

    A liberal arts program starts with this question: Why? What follows is an open ended, life long exploration, deductive in nature with each hypothesis tested and tested again and again.

    It seems in the centers of education noted above "Why" is a given, and what follows is an inductive process to weed out anything which might re-open the question to debate.

    A college eduction is more than a training school, and a career as an engineer or CAD designer can be had without asking why or accepting why as a given. Do we really want our scientists and doctors of medicine, reasearchers and lawyers to learn a trade alone, or should we require a background in ethics and the humanities too?
     
  9. High_Gravity
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    High_Gravity Belligerent Drunk Supporting Member

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    Send em all to the Marines before they go to college.
     
  10. Anachronism
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    When they are the sole basis for an education that is supposed to prepare you for a CAREER and the ability to make a living, YES they are. As I commented about Wesleyan University in my hometown. The sole piece of necessary info out of that education is the phrase.... "Would you like fries with that?" because it's all that education qualifies you to do in my experience and opinion.

    Industrial Arts, not necessarily. Career focused and oriented, DEFINITELY. College is the place to learn the skills and information necessary to provide the foundation for your career; whether that is in engineering, law, medicine, accounting, hotel & restaurant management, business, etc.... I believe that Elementary & Secondary Ed should be about providing the basic building blocks (or technical/trades for those not going on to college) and collegiate education should be about building the foundation for a career.

    Yes it does and thank you for seeing that.

    In the sort of society that I envision I'd be a tradesman or involved in the military/security sector. Definitely not a member of the ruling class or the business class but somewhere slightly above the unskilled laborers.
     

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