Underemployed And Hating Life

Discussion in 'Media' started by hvactec, Oct 22, 2011.

  1. hvactec
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    hvactec VIP Member

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    Today, millions of smart, hard working Americans are flipping burgers, waiting tables or working dead end retail jobs not because they want to, but because they have no other options. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, about 14 million Americans are currently unemployed and another 9.3 million Americans are currently "underemployed". During this economic downturn, a lot of Americans have been forced to take part-time jobs because they have been unable to find full-time jobs. For many, this can be a soul-crushing experience. It can be easy to become very bitter when you have worked very hard all your life and yet you find yourself having to take a job that only pays you a fraction of what you used to make. A lot of young college graduates end up hating life because the only jobs that they can seem to find do not even require a college degree and don't even come close to enabling them to keep up with their crippling student loan debt payments. Sadly, the underemployment problem continues to grow even worse. In September alone, the number of underemployed Americans rose by close to half a million.

    There are other measurements that indicate that unemployment in America is even worse that the Bureau of Labor Statistics is indicating.

    For example, a recent Gallup poll found that approximately one out of every five Americans that currently have a job consider themselves to be underemployed.

    In addition, according to author Paul Osterman about 20 percent of all U.S. adults are currently working jobs that pay poverty-level wages.

    When you try as hard as you can and you still can't pay the bills, it is easy to end up hating life.

    What some Americans are going through is absolutely heart breaking. Just consider the following story from a recent article on Fox News....

    Damian Birkel, of Winston-Salem N.C., found himself in similar circumstances. He was a marketing manager at Sarah Lee in the early 1990s when he was downsized. Since then, he has been laid off from three other jobs, including one at a recruiting firm.

    “I felt like I had ‘loser’ tattooed to my forehead, and ‘will work for food’ tattooed to my chest,” he says.

    The hardest part was telling his young daughter that there might not be enough money to pay the bills -- among them, sending her to summer camp. “She brings her piggy bank and says, 'Daddy, why don’t you break into the piggy bank so that you can pay some of the bills.'”

    How would you feel if your little daughter said that to you?

    Unfortunately, the number of good jobs just continues to decrease.

    There are fewer payroll jobs in the United States today than there were back in 2000 even though we have added 30 million extra people to the population since then.

    And the mix of jobs that our economy is producing continues to change.

    Back in 1980, less than 30% of all jobs in the United States were low income jobs. Today, more than 40% of all jobs in the United States are low income jobs.

    What that means is that the middle class is shrinking.

    A lot of young people are coming out of college right now and are having their dreams absolutely crushed. Large numbers of them are entering the "real world" with nightmarish student loan debt burdens and only a limited number of them can find decent jobs.

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