Train The Iraqi Forces Better

Discussion in 'Middle East - General' started by NATO AIR, Oct 19, 2006.

  1. NATO AIR
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    NATO AIR Senior Member

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    Max Boot offers some constructive, though unlikely to be followed, advice. Stuff like this just proves to me the Army isn't serious about COIN:

     
  2. CSM
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    CSM Senior Member

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    What the article fails to mention is that many of the billets involving training Iraqii troops are assigned to National Guard and Reserve soldiers who receive (at best) a couple of weeks training. The lack of expertise coupled with the cultural and language barriers results in US soldiers providing less than adequate training. The Army in particular is screwing the pooch on this one. No active duty officer in his right mind wants to have his career sidetracked or even derailed by such an assignment. The school at Ft. Riley might be a good thing for "the next time" but it isn't doing crap for the Iraq situation.
     
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  3. NATO AIR
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    NATO AIR Senior Member

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    Excellent, thank you for pointing that out.

    In a few convos I've had with FAO's, it appears that five years after 9/11 they're still getting screwed on promotions across the board.

    This all just tells me the Army is not serious about this. Yet the enemy gets smarter and more deadly every month, look at the recent splintering of the sectarian militias into more violent cells. Big Army doesn't know how to fight that. Guys with the kind of training you and Boot discuss can.

    I'd like to say this is the only bad spot, but aside from the Marines, the Air Force is ignoring reality and just pushed doubly hard for an unnecessary, unexpected expansion of the F-22 program and the Navy is dreaming of war with China, at least to justify its unnecessary purchases. The country is going down the shithole, and the military leadership seems to be intent on taking the lead on this decline. Anything for a better job with Northrupp Grumman & Boeing though right?
     
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    I would have to say that the Air Force is struggling for relevance in the kind of war we are fighting currently and so is the Navy. The USAF is cutting 40,000 personnel over the next year, in part to pay for those stupid airplanes. Also, you will hear from the flyboys how they are flying 300 sorties a day over there. What they wont tell you is that most of those sorties are logistics flights. A few are recon flights and most of those are UAVs. Only a couple of those sorties are actually carrying ordnance. Lets face it, the Army and Marines are carrying the greater portion of the burden.

    As for military leadership, here is some food for thought. The Army leadership of today (specifically 2-star and up) came on the scene initially at the tail end of Viet Nam. They progressed in their career in a culture that was dependent upon political skills for advancement, not warfighting skills. I am not at all surprised at their apparent poor decision making in this environment. Their background, training and experience has made them ill equipped to deal with the situation they find themsleves in. There are a few exceptions, but not many.

    You have to remember that during the 70s and 80s, a commander's ratings were more dependent on how they handled racism, sexual harrassment, perceived drug problems and the many "social experiments" forced upon the Army by our own citizens and politicians. Those that excelled in the political arena are today's generals that we are asking to lead us in war. Some have adapted and are learning fast....others...well... they are not doing so well.

    The same is true of enlisted soldiers. We now have in our Army more junior enlisted soldiers with REAL combat experience than that of their senior NCO's. Again there are exceptions, but not many.
     

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