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Discussion in 'Humor' started by Merlin1047, Sep 18, 2004.

  1. Merlin1047
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    Merlin1047 Senior Member

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    e-mail from a friend. author unknown.

    Florida Hurricane Season Notes:

    We're about to enter the peak of the hurricane season in
    Florida. If you're new to the area, you're probably
    wondering what you need to do to prepare for the
    possibility that we'll get hit by "the big one." Based on
    our experiences, we recommend that you follow this simple
    three-step hurricane preparedness plan:

    STEP 1. Buy enough food and bottled water to last your
    family for at least three days.

    STEP 2. Put these supplies into your car.

    STEP 3. Drive to Arizona and remain there until Thanks-
    giving.

    Unfortunately, statistics show that most people will not
    follow this sensible plan. Most people will foolishly stay
    here in Florida. We'll start with one of the most important
    hurricane preparedness items:

    HOMEOWNERS' INSURANCE: If you own a home, you must have
    hurricane insurance. Fortunately, this insurance is cheap
    and easy to get, as long as your home meets two basic
    requirements:

    (1) It is reasonably well-built, and...

    (2) It is located in Arizona.

    Unfortunately, if your home is located in Florida, or any
    other area that might actually be hit by a hurricane, most
    insurance companies would prefer not to sell you hurricane
    insurance, because then they might be required to pay YOU
    money, and that is certainly not why they got into the
    insurance business in the first place.


    EVACUATION ROUTE: If you live in a low-lying area, you should
    have an evacuation route planned out. (To determine whether
    you live in a low-lying area, look at your driver's license;
    if it says "Florida", you live in a low-lying area.)

    The purpose of having an evacuation route is to avoid being
    trapped in your home when a major storm hits. Instead, you
    will be trapped in a gigantic traffic jam several miles from
    your home, along with two hundred thousand other evacuees.
    So, as a bonus, you will not be lonely.


    Of course these are just basic precautions. As the hurricane
    draws near, it is vitally important that you keep abreast
    of the situation by turning on your television and watching
    TV reporters in rain slickers stand right next to the ocean
    and tell you over and over how vitally important it is for
    everybody to stay away from the ocean.

    Good luck, and remember: It's great living in Paradise
     
  2. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    Merlin, I have been giving serious consideration to moving to FL when I finish my Master's. They are paying bonuses to teacher's with. Now, my parents sold their home on the Atlantic coast a couple of years ago, good thing, since their community was hard hit.

    They paid more for their hurricane insurance than they would have for mortgage, if they'd had one. (figuring 20%down.) They were unable to obtain 'flood insurance' at any price.

    Is it smart to live in FL? LA? Is there something not so smart at living below sea level?
     
  3. onedomino
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    onedomino SCE to AUX

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    I'm not sure about teacher's bonuses in LA. But if you like warm weather (zero winter), then Southern California is excellent. As you know, Florida is very humid. SC is dry, more comfortable, and there are no hurricanes (just the occasional massive earthquake). While LA is very interesting and offers everything, it is too huge and congested. Four of the top five most populated counties in the US are in Southern California: Los Angeles, Riverside, Orange, and San Diego. It is better to live within reasonable drive time distance from LA and visit there from time to time. But if you like big population, I recommend San Diego. It is the city that LA wanted to be. Among the best places to live in California are the smaller cities along the central coast; between Santa Cruz in the north, and Ventura in the south. Bring some SPF 50 sun block. Here in Santa Barbara it has not rained a drop since last December. The sun shines all day, every day. It only rains 5 or 10 times per year during November and December.
     
  4. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    Back in the summer of 2001, before 9/11, I spent nearly a month in LA. I fell in love with both the weather and the people. Unfortunately, the cost of living is beyond my reach.
     
  5. onedomino
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    onedomino SCE to AUX

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    You would be a great addition to the state. Depending on where you choose to live, there are plenty of affordable places to live in California south of San Francisco (Santa Barbara is not one of them). As I mentioned, the central coast cites are very nice, e.g., Santa Maria is beautiful, affordable, and only 12 miles from the ocean.

    http://www.santamaria.com/

    http://www.centralcoast-tourism.com/
     
  6. Merlin1047
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    Merlin1047 Senior Member

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    Can't help you much with Florida. I avoid the place because the motorcycle riding really sucks there - nothing but straight, flat roads. Their idea of a fun curve is the cloverleaf exit ramp off I-10.

    But there are lots of nice places to live in FL. Deland comes to mind. College town near the St John river. Jacksonville is also a great place, so is Tampa. But no matter where in FL one may reside, hurricanes are going to be a fact of life.

    Of course then there's California - - - and the San Andreas fault.

    Hmmmm - let's see. . . hurricanes or earthquakes? 120 mph breezes or having the ground swallow you up? Decisions, decisions.
     
  7. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    LOL Well I don't ride cycles, and as far as flatlands, for crying out loud, I'm from Illinois! I do think it considerate that the hurricanes give notice, even if they sometimes change their direction. Earthquakes and tornadoes do not give warning.
     

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