To Declaw or not declaw

Discussion in 'Pets' started by JoeB131, Sep 10, 2011.

  1. JoeB131
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    JoeB131 Diamond Member

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    that is the question.

    Back in February, I got a new cat to replace my companion of 15 years.

    I didn't declaw the old cat because he was sufficiently mellow to where that wasn't an issue.

    this new cat, while affectionate, seems to like to use it's claws whenever possible- on the furniture, on me, etc.

    I'm reluctant to declaw, but obviously, the damage the animal is doing is going to set me back quite a bit, and there is always the liability if she claws a guest.
     
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  2. Sunshine
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    Sunshine Trust the pie. Supporting Member

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    Start with claw covers:

    Soft Claws Natural Kitten Feline <5LB Cat Nail Caps

    If that doesn't work get kitty nail clippers. Over time you can clip them down so they are like dog claws. But it takes time fore the vein in the claw to retract. And your cat will hate you.

    As to liability. My cat bites. Just play biting. She never got out of that kitten play thing. I tell EVERYONE who comes to my house that my cat bites. They put their hands down there anyway and when she bits them, I just say, 'Told ya.' They all think they have a way with animals. ROFL.
     
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    Last edited: Sep 10, 2011
  3. Provocateur
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    Why reluctant? Are you going to even keep the animal for over 10 years if it ruins every piece of furniture?

    Declaw.
     
  4. RadiomanATL
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    RadiomanATL Senior Member

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    Get a dog.
     
  5. JoeB131
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    JoeB131 Diamond Member

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    With my work schedule, I don't have time to be fair to a dog. I have time to be fair to a cat since a cat could care less if you live or die. Also, my condo association doesn't allow dogs and they've evicted owners for keeping them.
     
  6. JoeB131
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    JoeB131 Diamond Member

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    I've tried the nail clippers. It throws a fit if I even pick them up.

    This cat is relatively young compared to the last one, so it still has some kitty issues. Also, the previous owners abandoned her at a shelter and she was at the shelter for four months before I got her. They kept her in the cage most of the time because she didn't get along with other cats. So I'm actually dealing with some psychological issues.

    Maybe I need kitty shrink..

    But thanks for the advice on claw covers, I'll give that a go.
     
  7. Provocateur
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    Do you ever want to own a nice piece of furniture? To some, I suppose it doesn't matter.


    Get rid of the claws or get rid of the cat. Seems pretty simple to me.
     
  8. saveliberty
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    saveliberty Diamond Member

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    If the cat will be outdoors at all, keep the claws. If strictly indoors, Daisy makes a better pet without.
     
  9. WorldWatcher
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    WorldWatcher Gold Member

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    >


    You could always go with aversion therapy.




    Keep a tazer handy for when you catch the cat scratching furniture. :eusa_angel:


    >>>>
     
  10. MikeK
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    MikeK Gold Member

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    That sounds like a cat who either must be declawed, which I regard as a last resort measure, or be turned over to a shelter.

    I've had several cats, every one of which I was able to train.

    Presuming you have a scratching post or two, every time the cat uses its claws other than on the post (or scratching pad) you must grab it by the scruff, scold it angrily, slap at its paws, give it a good swat on the rump and take it right to the post and hold it there until it gets the idea.

    Also, use cat treats as an inducement. Cats look forward to getting a treat. Whenever you see the cat using the scratching post, give it a treat. Whenever it uses its claws otherwise, grab it by the scruff, hold the treat package to its nose, angrily shout, "NO!", take the package away and it gets no treat all day after that (in addition to a good swat on the rump.)

    Cats are smart and they catch on fast. If yours is one of the obstinate and willful ones (some are) I'm afraid you must either declaw or say goodbye. Because a cat can do a lot of damage if not constrained from misusing its weapons.
     

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