TIME: Dads Don't Deserve a Day

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by red states rule, Jun 16, 2007.

  1. red states rule
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    red states rule Senior Member

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    The liberal media never stops providing great material


    The Psychology of Fatherhood
    Thursday, Jun. 07, 2007 By SARAH BLAFFER HRDY, MARY BATTEN

    The folks at Hallmark are going to have a very good day on June 17. That's when more than 100 million of the company's ubiquitous cards will be given to the 66 million dads across the U.S. in observation of Father's Day. Such a blizzard of paper may be short of the more than 150 million cards sold for Mother's Day, but it's still quite a tribute. What's less clear is whether dads--at least as a group--have done a good enough job to deserve the honor.

    Worldwide, 10% to 40% of children grow up in households with no father at all. In the U.S., more than half of divorced fathers lose contact with their kids within a few years. By the end of 10 years, as many as two-thirds of them have drifted out of their children's lives. According to a 1994 study by the Children's Defense Fund, men are more likely to default on a child-support payment (49%) than a used-car payment (3%). Even fathers in intact families spend a lot less time focused on their kids than they think: in the U.S. fathers average less than an hour a day (up from 20 minutes a few decades ago), usually squeezed in after the workday.

    Anthropologists are trying to figure out why. Homo sapiens produces the most slowly maturing young of all mammals. Among foraging humans, children need 19 years--and consume 13 million calories--before producing more food for their community than they take from it, according to research by anthropologist Hillard Kaplan. You'd think fathers would be hardwired to provide for such needy offspring, and yet there is more variation in fathering styles across human cultures than among all other species of primates combined. Many of our primate kin are far better fathers than we are (investigators at the California primate center discovered that baby titi monkeys are in the arms of their fathers for as much as 90% of daylight hours); many are far worse. But all are at least consistent within their species. Why does paternal care in our species vary so much?

    to read the complete article

    http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1630551,00.html
     
  2. RetiredGySgt
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    RetiredGySgt Platinum Member

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    Couldn't be because in the US and else where in the west, Moms generally get custody in a contested case. Nor that it is still true that men provide the majority of household income. Society still has a stygma against men being the child raiser.
     
  3. red states rule
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    red states rule Senior Member

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    Leave it to Time to try a toss a bucket of cold water on Fathers Day

    Women wrote the article and most of the "experts" were women
     
  4. Gunny
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    Gunny Gold Member

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    I do agree with one thing .... Father's Day, Mother's Day, Valentine's Day are all dreamed up celebrations to make greeting card companies richer.

    Dads should get a damned day just for having to buy flowers, candy and cards all year round.

    Realistically though, I can do without yet another tie to hang in my closet and collect dust.
     
  5. red states rule
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    red states rule Senior Member

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    But I am sure, deep down, you love it when your kids give them to you.
     
  6. Gunny
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    Gunny Gold Member

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    My "kids" are 22 and 19. The only thing they "give" are phone calls asking for money.:eusa_eh:
     
  7. red states rule
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    red states rule Senior Member

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    OK - they come to the Dad Savings and Loan - what else is news about kids?

    Happy Fathers Day to you anyway
     
  8. Gunny
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    Gunny Gold Member

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    Talk about no sense of humor.:lol:
     
  9. BaronVonBigmeat
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    BaronVonBigmeat Senior Member

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    Heh, I think my grandparents who both grew up on a farm would disagree with this. Farming societies tend to have large families largely because more kids means more workers.
     
  10. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    I agree Baron, it's really only since WWII that 'kids' are still considered 'kids' until they finish school which for some of them is 25 or more. :rolleyes: My parents made the same agreement with me and my brother that we both made with our own kids, full time work or full time school, with part time work. We'll help through BA/BS, but advanced degrees are on your dime and you have to pay rent, food, utilities.

    All of them have gotten through or are finishing college. I couldn't 'help' more than paying their car insurance, (two of them did not have cars at school, so the cost was reduced as they were over 100 miles from home. The one that did have a car, made the car payments,) and getting them 'set up' with dorm stuff in their first year. An occasional book purchase via online purchase, but other than that, they made it on scholarship, working, being RA, tutoring, or giving voice lessons.

    Maturity seems to come when responsibility is expected. That's why fewer kids on farms felt neglected or that life was pointless. They knew they were needed and what they did was important.
     
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