The REAL Truth of the Civil Rights Struggle

Discussion in 'History' started by Bfgrn, Sep 30, 2012.

  1. Bfgrn
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    Bfgrn Gold Member

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    African Americans Return to Congress, 1929–1970

    The Civil Rights Movement And The Second Reconstruction, 1945—1968

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    A Herblock cartoon from March 1949 depicts a glum-looking President Harry S. Truman and “John Q. Public” inspecting worm-ridden apples representing Truman’s Fair Deal policies such as civil rights and rent controls. The alliance of conservative southern Democrats and Republicans in Congress who successfully blocked many of Truman’s initiatives is portrayed by the worm labeled “Coalition.”

    The broad period from the end of World War II until the late 1960s, often referred to as the “Second Reconstruction,” consisted of a grass-roots civil rights movement coupled with gradual but progressive actions by the Presidents, the federal courts, and Congress to provide full political rights for African Americans and to begin to redress longstanding economic and social inequities. While African-American Members of Congress from this era played prominent roles in advocating for reform, it was largely the efforts of everyday Americans who protested segregation that prodded a reluctant Congress to pass landmark civil rights legislation in the 1960s.

    During the 1940s and 1950s, executive action, rather than legislative initiatives, set the pace for measured movement toward desegregation. President Harry S. Truman “expanded on Roosevelt’s limited and tentative steps toward racial moderation and reconciliation.” Responding to civil rights advocates, Truman established the President’s Committee on Civil Rights. Significantly, the committee’s October 1947 report, To Secure These Rights, provided civil rights proponents in Congress a legislative blueprint for much of the next two decades. Among its recommendations were the creation of a permanent FEPC, the establishment of a permanent Civil Rights Commission, the creation of a civil rights division in the U.S. Department of Justice, and the enforcement of federal anti-lynching laws and desegregation in interstate transportation. In 1948, President Truman signed Executive Order 9981, desegregating the military. Truman’s civil rights policies contributed to the unraveling of the solid Democratic South. Alienated by the administration’s race policies, a faction of conservative southerners split to form the Dixiecrats, a racially conservative party that nominated South Carolina Governor (and future U.S. Senator) Strom Thurmond as its presidential candidate in 1948. President Dwight D. Eisenhower, though more cautious, also followed his predecessor’s pattern—desegregating Washington, DC, overseeing the integration of blacks to the military, and promoting minority rights in federal contracts.

    more MUCH more...
     
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  2. RetiredGySgt
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    RetiredGySgt Platinum Member

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    Civil rights act 80 percent of Republicans voted for it only 60 percent of Democrats, with out the republican vote it would not have passed.
     
  3. California Girl
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    California Girl BANNED

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    The 'real truth' seems to be a movable feast. Weird.
     
  4. Bfgrn
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    Bfgrn Gold Member

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    Great Republicans like Everett Dirksen were integral in passing the 1964 Civil Right Act and they deserve credit.

    BUT, It was a liberal Democrat, John F. Kennedy who proposed the Civil Rights Act. It was liberal Democrats in Robert F. Kennedy's DOJ who authored the Civil Rights Act and it was liberal Democrats who overwhelmingly voted for the Civil Rights Act of 1964. And it was conservative southerners from both parties who voted against the bill. The ONLY reason it was conservative southern Democrats who could block the bill is because there were virtually no southern Republicans in Congress in 1964.

    1964 Civil Rights Act

    Votes
    By party and region

    Note: "Southern", as used in this section, refers to members of Congress from the eleven states that made up the Confederate States of America in the American Civil War. "Northern" refers to members from the other 39 states, regardless of the geographic location of those states.

    The original House version:

    Southern Democrats: 7–87 (7–93%)
    Southern Republicans: 0–10 (0–100%)

    Northern Democrats: 145–9 (94–6%)
    Northern Republicans: 138–24 (85–15%)

    The Senate version:

    Southern Democrats: 1–20 (5–95%)
    Southern Republicans: 0–1 (0–100%)
    Northern Democrats: 45–1 (98–2%)
    Northern Republicans: 27–5 (84–16%)
     
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  5. jwoodie
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    jwoodie Gold Member Supporting Member

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    What ever happened to "the content of his character?"
     
  6. konradv
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    konradv Gold Member

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    Yeah, there were some great liberal Republicans back then. They got run out of the party, however.
     

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