The Pope's Regensburg Lecture:

Discussion in 'Israel and Palestine' started by Roudy, Apr 26, 2012.

  1. Roudy
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    Roudy Platinum Member

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    In his lecture in 2006, the pope, speaking in German, quoted an unfavorable remark about Islam made at the end of the 14th century by Manuel II Palaiologos, the Byzantine emperor. As the English translation of the pope's lecture was disseminated across the world, many Islamic politicians and religious leaders protested against what they saw as an insulting mischaracterization of Islam.

    Mass street protests were mounted in many Islamic countries, the Majlis-e-Shoora (Pakistani parliament) unanimously called on the Pope to retract "this objectionable statement".[3] The pope maintained that the comment he had quoted did not reflect his own views, and he offered an apology to Muslims.

    The controversial comment originally appeared in the 7th of the 26 Dialogues Held With A Certain Persian, the Worthy Mouterizes, in Anakara of Galatia, written in 1391 as an expression of the views of the Byzantine emperor Manuel II Palaiologos, one of the last Christian rulers before the Fall of Constantinople to the Muslim Ottoman Empire, on such issues as forced conversion, holy war, and the relationship between faith and reason. The passage, in the English translation published by the Vatican, is as follows:

    “Show me just what Muhammad brought that was new and there you will find things only evil and inhuman, such as his command to spread by the sword the faith he preached."

    The emperor, after having expressed himself so forcefully, goes on to explain in detail the reasons why spreading the faith through violence is something unreasonable. Violence is incompatible with the nature of God and the nature of the soul. "God", he says, "is not pleased by blood — and not acting reasonably is contrary to God's nature. Faith is born of the soul, not the body. Whoever would lead someone to faith needs the ability to speak well and to reason properly, without violence and threats… To convince a reasonable soul, one does not need a strong arm, or weapons of any kind, or any other means of threatening a person with death…

    The decisive statement in this argument against violent conversion is this: not to act in accordance with reason is contrary to God's nature. The editor, Theodore Khoury, observes: "For the emperor, as a Byzantine shaped by Greek philosophy, this statement is self-evident. But for Muslim teaching, God is absolutely transcendent. His will is not bound up with any of our categories, even that of rationality."
     
  2. ima
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    ima BANNED

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    Why do you care what an ex-nazi and leader of a pedophilic fraternity has to say?
     
  3. Roudy
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    Roudy Platinum Member

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    nope, he never was an "ex Nazi". More lies from the IslamoNazi worshipping hate America Jew hating crowd.
     
  4. Roudy
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    Roudy Platinum Member

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    Background

    Neither Ratzinger nor any member of his immediate family joined the NSDAP (Nazi Party). Ratzinger’s father was critical of the Nazi government, and as a result the family had to move four times before he was ten years old.

    None of this is remarkable, however, because the same happened with other German Catholic families. Although many German Catholic leaders were willing to work with the Nazis, many individual Catholics and Catholic priests resisted as best they could, refusing to cooperate with a political regime they regarded as anti-Catholic at best and the embodiment of evil at worst.

    Joseph Ratzinger joined the Hitler Youth in 1941 when, according to him and his supporters, it became compulsory for all German boys. Millions of Germans were in a position similar to that of Joseph Ratzinger and his family, so why spend so much time focusing on him? Because he is no longer merely Joseph Ratzinger, or even a Catholic Cardinal — he is now Pope Benedict XVI. None of the other Germans who joined the Hitler Youth, were part of the military in Nazi Germany, lived near a concentration camp, and watched Jews being rounded up for death camps has ever become pope.
     
  5. Peach
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    Peach Gold Member

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    Catholics did what they could, under threat of death, and some Catholics were sent to camps also.
     
  6. Roudy
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    Roudy Platinum Member

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    Although the Church at the time did cooperate with the Nazis to a certain extent. It had nothing to do with this Pope nor does it have anything to do with today's Church.
     
  7. Peach
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    Peach Gold Member

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    No, and what choice did the Catholic church have?
     
  8. Roudy
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    Roudy Platinum Member

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    As you can see I am the one defending the current Pope. Objectively speaking, the Church at the time gave credibility to the Nazi party at a time when the people were still on the fence, by "endorsing" them.

    Reichskonkordat

    The Reichskonkordat is a treaty that was agreed between the Holy See and Nazi government, that guarantees the rights of the Catholic Church in Germany. It was signed on July 20, 1933 by Secretary of State Eugenio Pacelli (who later became Pope Pius XII) and Vice Chancellor Franz von Papen on behalf of Pope Pius XI and President Paul von Hindenburg respectively. The Holy See reported many violations of the agreement which began soon after it was ratified and culminated in the issuing of the papal encyclical Mit Brennender Sorge in early 1937. The Reichskonkordat is the most controversial of several concordats agreed between various states and the Vatican during the reign of Pope Pius XI and is frequently discussed in works that deal with the rise of Hitler in the early 1930s and the Holocaust. The concordat has been described as giving moral legitimacy to the Nazi regime soon after Hitler had acquired dictatorial powers, having placed constraints on Catholics critical of the regime, leading to a muted response by the Church to the policies of the Nazis. From a Roman Catholic church perspective it has been argued that the concordat prevented even greater evils being unleashed against the Church. Though the German bishops were unenthusiastic, and the allied forces felt it was inappropriate, Pope Pius XII argued to keep the concordat at the end of World War II and the treaty is still in force today.
     
  9. ima
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    ima BANNED

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    He was in the nazi youth.

    So anyways, why do you care what the head of a homo-pedophilic fraternity has to say?
     

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