The Official "Feedback Loop/Ocean Acidification" Challenge Thread

Discussion in 'Environment' started by CrusaderFrank, Mar 17, 2012.

  1. CrusaderFrank
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    CrusaderFrank Diamond Member

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    One of the key tenants of cult of "manmade Global Warming" is that mankind's increase in atmospheric CO2 as a result of burning "fossil fuels" causes a "feedback loop" where warmer temperatures cause the oceans to absorb less CO2, thereby adding it to the atmosphere, thereby making it warmer, thereby causing more CO2 to exit the ocean.

    Then, without skipping a beat, we are also told that more CO2 is entering the ocean, turning it "Acidic" (don't laugh, this is settled science. They have Consensus, ya know).

    How can CO2 be simultaneously exiting the ocean in a "feedback loop" and increasing its present in the ocean enough to kill coral by turning the oceans "Acidic"

    The two concepts are mutually exclusive.

    You don't have to be a scientist to see how wrong this is.
     
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2012
  2. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    Ocean Acidification from CO 2 Is Happening Faster Than Thought: Scientific American

    A lesser-known consequence of having a lot of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the air is the acidification of water. Oceans naturally absorb the greenhouse gas; in fact, they take in roughly one third of the carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere by human activities. When CO2 dissolves in water, it forms carbonic acid, the same substance found in carbonated beverages. New research now suggests that seawater might be growing acidic more quickly than climate change models have predicted.

    Marine ecologist J. Timothy Wootton of the University of Chicago and his colleagues spent eight years compiling measurements of acidity, salinity, temperature and other data from Tatoosh Island off the northwestern tip of Washington State. They found that the average acidity rose more than 10 times faster than predicted by climate simulations.

    Highly acidic water can wreak havoc on marine life. For instance, it can dissolve the calcium carbonate in seashells and coral reefs [see “The Dangers of Ocean Acidification,” by Scott C. Doney; Scientific American, March 2006]. In their study, published in the December 2 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, Wootton and his team discovered that the balance of ecosystems shifted: populations of large-shelled animals such as mussels and stalked barnacles dropped, whereas smaller-shelled species and noncalcareous algae (species that lack calcium-based skeletons) became more abundant. “I see it as a harbinger of the trends we might expect to occur in the future,” says oceanographer Scott C. Doney of the Woods Hole Ocean*ographic Institution, who did not participate in this study
     
  3. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    Saturation of the southern ocean CO2 sink due to rec... [Science. 2007] - PubMed - NCBI

    Saturation of the southern ocean CO2 sink due to recent climate change.

    Le Quéré C, Rödenbeck C, Buitenhuis ET, Conway TJ, Langenfelds R, Gomez A, Labuschagne C, Ramonet M, Nakazawa T, Metzl N, Gillett N, Heimann M.


    Source

    Max Planck Institut für Biogeochemie, Postfach 100164, D-07701 Jena, Germany. c.lequere@uea.ac.uk


    Abstract

    Based on observed atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration and an inverse method, we estimate that the Southern Ocean sink of CO2 has weakened between 1981 and 2004 by 0.08 petagrams of carbon per year per decade relative to the trend expected from the large increase in atmospheric CO2. We attribute this weakening to the observed increase in Southern Ocean winds resulting from human activities, which is projected to continue in the future. Consequences include a reduction of the efficiency of the Southern Ocean sink of CO2 in the short term (about 25 years) and possibly a higher level of stabilization of atmospheric CO2 on a multicentury time scale.
     
  4. CrusaderFrank
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    CrusaderFrank Diamond Member

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  5. CrusaderFrank
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    CrusaderFrank Diamond Member

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    Also, show us how less than a rounding error of additional CO2 makes the oceans "Acidic"
     
  6. IanC
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    IanC Gold Member

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    the pH of coastal waters is always fluxuating. by orders of magnitude more than the claimed change caused by CO2. this is almost, but not quite, as ridiculous as the recent paper claiming increased CO2 causes obesity.
     
  7. IanC
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    IanC Gold Member

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    oh, and the pH of the oceans is not anywheres close to being acidic. the proper term is neutralizing when you are making a change back towards neutral pH.
     
  8. CrusaderFrank
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    CrusaderFrank Diamond Member

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    That's not what OR peer-reviewed settled science Consensus articles say

    "Highly acidic water can wreak havoc on marine life" The CO2 that is simultaneously entering and leaving the oceans are turning them into gastric juices
     
  9. konradv
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    They say nothing of the sort. If water has extra CO2 causing a lowering of pH, there would also be extra to release to the atmosphere. They're NOT mutually exclusive. Carbonated beverages are the extreme, acidic and very likely to release CO2. It's just a matter of scale.
     
  10. CrusaderFrank
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    CrusaderFrank Diamond Member

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    How can water possibly have any "Extra" CO2 when it's leeching OUT of the ocean in a "Feedback Loop"?

    The two concepts are mutually exclusive
     

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