The Military Leadership Has Gone Too PC

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by Annie, Jun 14, 2006.

  1. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    http://michellemalkin.com/archives/005385.htm

    The Hadji Girl video is all over the web, it's obviously humor and also 'off time.' At Blackfive, they are pretty mad about it:

    http://www.blackfive.net/main/2006/06/hadji_girl_is_t.html

     
  2. 007
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    007 Charter Member Supporting Member

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    You wanna hear something pathetic, the son of our service manager is going to enlist in the Air Force later this year. I was talking to him about it and my eight years in the Force, and the topic turned to basic training. I told him that they would scream at you and throw your shit around, and MAYBE push or tap you, but they won't HIT you. He said, "uh uh, not anymore, not at all." "If you feel stressed, you have a STRESS card hanging around your neck, and all you do is flash the *stress card* at the drill instructor and he's got to stop hollering at you". :rotflmao:

    What a fucking LAUGH!!! Our military is turning out PUSSIES, and basic training has been turned into a slumber party!!!
     
  3. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    Well it looks as if at least one ret. marine agrees with the 'too pc':

    http://www.blackfive.net/main/2006/06/a_marine_for_li.html#more
     
  4. Redhots
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    Redhots Member

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    He'll be in for one hell of a surprise when he gets to boot camp then...

    http://www.snopes.com/military/stress.htm

    Claim: Recruits in basic training are issued "stress cards," which when waved at demanding drill sergeants immediately entitle recruits to gentler treatment.

    Status: False.

    Origins: This is one of those tales that has the smallest kernel of truth to it, but that truth is almost unrecognizable in the form the scuttlebutt has since taken.

    For a few years during the 1990s, the US Navy did issue "stress cards" to new recruits, but they weren't the "Get out of jail free" coupons military lore has since turned them into. Rather, these cards listed names and phone numbers of resources the newcomers could contact "if things pile[d] up." The cards were strictly for informational purposes: they informed recruits of available support services.

    Navy trainers began reporting that some of the recruits had taken to raising their cards while being disciplined, as a way of signalling for time out. It's unclear whether any of those enduring basic training really thought that was the purpose of the cards or whether this was just standard armed forces jackassing, but the Navy took no chances and got rid of the cards.

    This short-lived experiment with providing recruits with clear information about whom to contact when things went bump in the night has morphed into an unflattering and unsettling illustration of today's soldier as a creampuff. Notice how the story has mutated into one where the drill instructors are portrayed as honor bound to obey the cards when they are displayed to them, an aspect that wasn't part of things during the real cards' short life. The story has also widened its net; what was a Navy hand-out has, in the world of rumor, become a card issued to Army and Marine recruits, making this an Armed Forces-wide phenomenon.

    Why was such a story so happily seized upon? We always want to believe anything we've been part of was the biggest, the baddest, and the best. One of the ways we bolster that belief is by looking pityingly upon the current crop who have since taken our places. The high school teams we played on were the toughest and most feared, with today's iterations only pale imitations of the ones we were part of. Likewise, the music of our youth has it all over today's stuff, and schooling in our day was rigorous and thorough, with the hike to the schoolhouse uphill both ways through the snow.

    That sentiment, that need to feel superior through disparaging comparison, is part of what underpins this legend about stress cards. In any vet's mind, the armed forces went careening downhill the moment he left. Throughout the history of human endeavor, people have looked back to note with satisfaction how things have gone to hell in a handbasket since their glory days, be they bridge players, churchgoers, parents, or soldiers. It's just human nature.

    Change is also threatening, and any shift in how things are run will always bring out the doomsayers, those who will feel it their duty to point out everything is about to come apart. They will hold up any small misstep and repeat any wild tale that seemingly confirms their gloomy prognostications. Just as the influx of women into the armed forces raised misgivings often expressed in "Told you so" kinds of tales, so the "stress card" canard quickly caught on in military lore because it captured the essence of what many believe, that today's army has gone soft.
     
  5. OCA
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    OCA Senior Member

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    I have been saying this all along for the love of god! Even though this stress card may be bullshit the notion of the military trying to be like the peace corps while attempting to fight a war is the main reason for the debacle in Iraq........too much handing out of fucking candy and gatorade and not enough 7.62 mm to the grill. Need more of an enemy body count, much more.
     
  6. 007
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    007 Charter Member Supporting Member

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    I should have known to look, but thanks all the same red.

    I'll print this out and give it to him.
     
  7. Redhots
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    Redhots Member

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    No don't!

    If he honestly believes that story all the better for when hes getting grilled by a SM and he says "Wait, wait, time out! I'm sorry, they forgot to issue me my stress card, but I still want to call a time out. Ok?"

    :rotflmao:
     
  8. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    Seem to have gotten a message out, though it's NOT about them:

    http://www.nctimes.com/articles/2006/07/04/news/top_stories/03_70_327_4_06.txt
     
  9. Gunny
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    Gunny Gold Member

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    Yeah, right. Let me tell you what those "informational" cards were used for .... to remind the Drill Instructor that the recruit has the phone number of the series commander on that card and is more than willing to make an allegation.

    Calling them "stress cards" is probably somebody's idea of sarcasm, and I would be more than willing to bet that is where it originated.

    AND, speaking solely from experience, and the Marine Corps, the rules for how Drill Instructors are allowed to handle recruits have not changed in years. Enforcement of them has, and dumbass series commanders are looking for excuses to jack up the hats.

    Marine recruits usally spend an average of 2 weeks in processing, in which time, a low-stress environment is strictly enforced.

    And, I HAVE seen actual stress cards with own two eyes, I just cannot recall specifically where, or who had them. They DO exist.

    So, there is more than just a kernel of truth to the story.
     
  10. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    I just read through the Snopes article again. There's a problem. My dad figures he had it much easier than the kids today. Or in Korea, Vietnam, etc. He didn't 'sign up' for WWII, he admits he hadn't a clue to where Hawaii was, much less why Pearl Harbor was important. He was pissed at the death and destruction, but admits it would have been cool with him if he could have cheered others on from a job in Chicago, to those brave enough to sign up.

    As the war dragged on, he did get the importance, which made all the 'bullsh*t' worth it. Not enough mind anyone, that it ever crossed his mind to reenlist. He believes that the 'kids' today are way smarter than he was, more attuned to the world and the dangers.

    But he was drafted. He spent a couple years between CA and TX, then in England for awhile, til sent to France for a day in June. Managed to get into the 3rd wave at Omaha, got to the dune then it's black. Other than fighting someone that wanted to amputate his hand, (he won), doesn't remember anything until he was back in London. Recuperating there for nearly 5 months. Then back to TX to tally the points for others to get out.

    My dad and uncles, friends of theirs, quite a few that were in the Pacific, which they all agree was the worst; to a man they believe that those serving today are vastly superior in committment, knowledge, and courage than they were. I don't necessarily agree, then again, I wasn't there.
     

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